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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, August 10, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-08-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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eather forecast
—Tonight: Unsettled, cooler.
Tomorrow: Fair and cooler.
)l 5, NO. 191.
GCj yt M utte 3 Batlp :Post.
BUTTE MONTANA. FRIDAY. AUGUST 10. 1917
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Unsettled tonight, prob
ably showers east; cooler west and north
central. Saturday, fair, cooler east, south.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
iNTANA FIRST STATE TO DOUBLE ITS REGULAR ARMY QUOTA
»78 Volunteers Fro m Treasure S * .e Have Been Accepted by the Government
IS BANNER RECORD
THE WHOLE NATION
[FLITS I
BE PUT III
STUTE RM
Ikable Achievement in
erty Loan. Red Cross
and Volunteers.
TTLE BETTEH" HIS
IE TO BE STATE'S AIM
Enlistments From This
pty Also Are Surpris
ingly High.
|E A GREAT CENTER
lOR RECRUITING WORK
Cities of Montana Have
|ded Greatly in Patri
otic Service.
hinitf on. Aug. 10.—With the ;
olunteers of yesterday the ;
army was raised to its full j
rength of .100,000. Since
more than 18:1,898 volun
ave been enlisted. Twenty- [
itates filled (heir quotas and
I not. Montana doubled her
hington. Aug. 10.—Montana
I first stale in the union to
its quota for the regular
"hen recruiting liegan on
|l in Montana the state of
na was assigned a quota of
To date it has raised by
arv enlistment a total of
I men. The war department
that this is the banner
I of the nation.
has taken the leading part in
is patriotic leadership .since
«h laced with Germany. It
n the slogan of "a little bet
others" for the fulfilling of
fduty unsigned to it by the na
I.ool f,-, upon with unconcern by
< ities of the east, it lias made
which, for its size, is
pi h> but few' cities in the
States.
" ir department said that
[ fContinued <
Page Five.)
I
I
I
i
[NERAL PRODUCTION OF
I0NTANA IS $51,000,000
MORE IN 1916 THAN 1915
r ,s t a Washington Bureau. j
F'ngton. D. C., Aug. 10.—The
png advance table, showing Mon
PRODUCTION OF GOLD, SILVER, COPPER, LEAD AND
ZINC, BY COUNTIES, IN MONTANA IN 1916.
' Advance Figur,, by V. C. HtikM, V. 8. GMloxicil Surrey,
2.660
7,828
2.906
66.716
u
3
h
: :
3 3
si
n
H
\
P
278.87]
3.990.60,
816.02
36.848.54
I?
12 66.285! 20,981.23
1 26'.........
40 26.364; 6,482.86*
66 64.331! 4.857.4*1
«5 72.442; 36,678.761
J 343, 447.28,
93 24.094! 89,878.88*
6 2,002 , 2.961
2l l 45,087 j 598.21
15; 781 j 338.92'
3 82 88.23'
4 269,880 19.946.90j
866 1.681.18!
6 20.000) 981.671
26.66!
90,616
7.228]
98.6611
36.155,
18.920]
*1
649.328;
164.7081
101,685]
!
226.132
700.642.
3.916!
163.949
8.280
1.48b .
493,349
862,857
33,102
594,
786,308
48.480
635.169
60 , 598 ,
93 . 3511 .
75,709
679.760.
92,285
10,500
383 . 657 ,
S9.063
898.848j
43.818;
8461 41 .:
616 ].......
176 , 907 !.......
380.668: 1.809,188, 3.116.812!
41.321,.........!..........
47 , 071.39
18,7801
27,9241
8 , 328 |
27.9671
16 , 088 .
86,498
14 , 988,771 [ 849 , 588,498
62.620; 488.532'
83.865;.
$176.091
262.7 84
118.796
811,180
450.324
367
699.782
586.872
816.306
10,314
904.310
58.437
664,251
17.794
1,512
528.086
65.570
112.396
33.062
9.195,082 224.686.1421 127.547.714
I '
18,595.186! 229.869.076 $188*882.947
13.756.386i 187.146.896: 82.912.264
«Äb^Ctald. $20.6718 per ounce ; silver. $0.658 per ounce: copper. $0.246
• W.069 per pound: zinc, $0.134 per pou«**
WHEN THE DRIFTED
MEN LEAVE HOMES
Entrainment of First Sec
tion of New Army to Be
Great Event.
Washington, Aug. 10.—A national
holiday may be declared on Sept. 3
in honor of the entrainment of the
draft levies for the training canton
ments. No step to this end has
been made as yet, but officials at
the provost marshal general's of
fice regard it as probable.
Conferences were had today with
railway officials on mobilization de
tails. Transportation lines face the
problem of collecting the first 230,
000 men from 4,570 districts.
SUFFRAGETTE DANNER
SAKS "KAISER W ILSON"
Bunting With Offending Words
Torn Down by Indig
nant Crowd.
Washington, Aug. 10.—A banner dis
played at one of the white house gates
by a woman's party, suffrage picket
addressed to "Kaiser Wilson" was
torn down today after an indignant
crowd had jeered and hissed the suf
fragists for several minutes.
NEW ORDER AFFECTS
MANY HIGH GENERAIS
War Department's Regulation
May Keep Wood. Bell and
Others at Home.
Washington. Aug. 10—Army depart
ment commanders, by war department
orders issued today, are relieved of
supervision of the national army can
tonments and national guard «amps
within their departments, and will de
vote themselves entirely to the regular
troops within their Jurisdictions.
The effect of this order, unless there
are changes in the high commands.
I will be to keep some of the best known
I American commanders, such as Major
I General Wood. Maj. Gen. J. Franklin
i Bell and others, in department com
mands at home instead of sending
them with the armies to Europe.
There are to be more than 200 new'
generals appointed within the .next few
days.
I
j tana's mine production in 1916, was is
sued today by the United States geo
I logical survey:__^_
rnoms Ht hit
NURD IN TAX BILLS
These Two Items Will Furnish
$1.400,000,000 in $2.000,
000,000 Revenue.
SIMMONS EXPLAINS NEW
DRAFT OF WAR MEASURE
;War Profits in 1916 Thirty
three Hundred Millions,
He Tells Senate.
Washington, Aug. 10.— TH« redrafted
war revenue bill imposing taxes to the
amount of more than $2,000.000,000
was taken up for consideration in the
senate today with exclusive right of
way until disposed of. Debate on the
measure is expected to last about two
weeks, after which it will go to c
ference for adjustment of difficulties
between the two houses. In opening
debate on the bill today, Senator Sim
mons, chairman of the finance com
mittee, declared the committee's pur
pose in revising the house bill was to
raise sufficient federal revenues
extra war expenses without injustice
to rich or poor and without inju
sources from which the needs of the
future taxes mutt come.
The bill, »aid Senator Simmons, pro
poses to raise a larger proportion
war revenues by direct taxation and
less by bonds, distributing the
burden between the present and future
generations. Ho pointed out that near
ly $1.400,000,000 of the new war taxes
nre to be obtained from incomops and
war profits alone, with over $200.000,
000 more from intoxicants.
As to War Profits.
"Before tHe war," continued Sena
tor Simmons, "our total expenditures
were between $700,000,000 and $800,
000,000, exclusive of postal costs. It is
evident that the expenditures during
this fiscal year will reach something
like 10 billions of dollars. These con
ditions suggest incomes and war
profits as the chief and just source of
revenue to defray the expenses of the
war. Apparently the house did
take this \ lew. As the war profits for
1016 exceed thirty hundred millions of
(Continued <
Tage Five.)
PRESIDENT SIGNS THE
FOOD GONTHOL DUES
Full Supervision of Nation's
Food Supply Expected to
Come Quickly.
Washington. Aug. 10.—The admin
istration food control and food sur
vey bills were signed today by Presi
dent Wilson and became law.
The food Hills were signed also by
Speaker Clark in the house and by
Senator Saulsbury. president pro tem
pore of the senate, before they were
taken to the white house for President
Wilson's signature.
The appointment of Herbert Hoover
ns food administrator and the full or
ganization of machinery of control and
distribution of the nation's food sup
ply are expected to quickly follow.
The first bill provides for stimula
tion of production and the second for
control of foods and fuels.
BRIDE IN EVENING GOWN
DRAGS GROOM FROM SURE
Beavey. Wash.. Aug. 10. Mr*. Helen
Ladd Green, whose wedding July 25
was an important Portland society
event, clad in an evening gown, rushed
into the breakers here Tuesday eve
ning to rescue her husband. Alan
Green, a Portland bond salesman, who
had been taken with cramps while
bathing in the surf. She reached her
husband and dragged him unconscious
to shore.
A TEN-DAY HALT IN
MARINE_RECRUITING
Washington, Aug. 10.—The big drive
to recruit the marine corps to its new
war strength of 30,000 men is over.
Major General Barnett today ordered
the recruiting stations closed for a
ten days' rest for the officers and men
who have made it possible. They
will reopen to recruit men to allow
for casualties among those "first to
fight"
Most Gigantic War Insurance Plan Ever
Contemplaled Is Laid Before Congress
POOR PATRIOT
m
WHADD/A know
aboot THAT Î
C0TLA ATANO
) uP for ni
■y COUNTRY *
A?
m
FRF.SH
Vv AR
taint
f
U
É&
B
<s'

«U»
Seattle Tim»*
22 Men Certified As Physically
Unfitted for Military Service
BRITISH LABOR PARTY
ANNOUNCES ITS IDEALS
FOR PEACEAGREEMENT
Most Important of All is a League for Prevention of War. It
Demands Reparation and Restoration for Belgium. Supports
Rights of Individual Peoples and Liberation of the Oppressed
From Turkish Rule. It Would Secure Democratization of;
Germany and Austria. But Would Not Crush Its Foes Polit- .
ically or Economically.
London, Aug. 10.—The conference of the British labor party held
at Westminster today voted to send delegates to the Stockholm con
sultative conference by 1,046.000 to 55,000. The conference was in an
uproar which ended only when the result of the card vote was
announced.
London. Aug. lO.^An important conference of the labor party will
be held at Westminster today to decide whether British labor shall be
represented at the International Socialist congress at Stockholm in
September. The conference will consist of delegates from all trades
unions and other labor socialist representatives and it is expected to
have momentous consequences.
A special sub-committee of the British labor party executive com
mittee has been preparing a memorandum upon the issues raised in
the war and the ideas of British l abor in regard to peace proposals.
in printed in today's Dally Tel
Thii ■ „ I
egraph and is to he presented to the
labor conference in London today and
further will be submitted to the spe
cial conference Aug. 21. prior to its
proposed submission successively to
the allied and international socialist
conferences.
Restoration of Belgium.
Briefly the memorandum is a strong
endorsement of the demand for the
reparation and restoration in behalf of
Belgium and other invuded countries;
a declaration in favor of the right of
individual |*eople to settle their own
destinies; liberation of oppressed peo
ples from Turkish misgovernment and
a demand for the establishment of a
league of nations for the maintenance
of peace and the elimination of war
from the world.
The memorandum Indicates that
Germany is threatening the very ex
istence of independent nationalities,
striking a blow at all faith in treaties
and declares that the victory of Ger
many would be the defeat and destruc
tion of democracy and liberty. It dis
avows the desire to crush Germany
politically and economically, and de
clares that while it is resolved to fight
until victory, it is equally resolved to
resist any attempt to transform the
war into a war of conquest.
The memorandum heartily congratu
— (Continued on Page Nine.)
j---- --- -
SPECIAL COMMISSION
TD SETTLE DISPUTES
Firms Taking Government Con
tracts Must Abide by
Decisions.
Washington, Aug. 10. Possibility of
important government contracts being
impeded seriously by labor disputes
virtually is eliminated by the creation
of a Hpeeial commission with extraor
dinary |K»wers to settle industrial
roubles The council u( national de
i fense. which recognized the board.
ill
award contracts only to those who will
abide by the decisions of the board
and require pledges of their employes
to do so.
Members of the board will soon he
selected. There are to be nine of
them, three representing the govern
ment, three employes and three labor.
The agreement provides, it was an
nounced. that only union labor .w ill be
employed.
ONLY 21 CLAIM
El
Explanation Made of Large
Number Filing Claims
Yesterday.
At noon today the county exemption
board had passed upon the physical !
qualifications of 124 men examined !
earlier in the week for military serv- !
ice. < »f the number, 22 men, or 17 per ,
cent, were pronounced physically de- |
ficlent. Such men are exempted from
military service as soon as their names ,
are posted in the board's offices. Good
news came to the board during the \
work of passing on physical exemp- |
lions, when clerks reported that up
until noon hut 21 additional men had
claimed exemption because of depend
ents. Out of the 198 men asked to re
port for exemption claims yesterday,
a total of 195 actually claimed exemp
tion, a proportion that was as stagger
ing as it was unexplainable. Today
the board explains that many men told
to report today and tomorrow could
not hold their patience and claimed ex
emption yesterday.
Should exemptions be claimed no
faster tomorrow than they have been
today, a total not greater than 275
such claims will he In the hands of the
hoard tomorrow night. It is believed
that about 90 per cent of these claims
(Continued on Page Twelve.)
SAYS CHAMBERLAIN WAS A
MEMBER OF AUTO BANDITS
Sheriff Crabb Confident Man
Killed Trying to Break Jail
at Malta Took Part in Ana
conda Holdup. Three of Four
Accounted for.
Ralph Chamberlain, the man w'ho
was shot and killed at Malta, Mont., a
short time ago, while attempting to
break Jail, was. in the opinion of
Sheriff J. B. Crabb of Malta, one of
the men who participated in the dar
ing holdup of automobiles near the
Three Mile house. Anaconda, during
which a man named Padovich was shot
and killed- and Miss Keogh of Ana
INSURE LIVES OF
This Will Be Result if Con
gress Endorses Remark
able Plan.
!
!
!
,
|
,
\
|
j
ILL BE LIBERIE ONE
Insurance to Run From $1.000
to $10.000, at a Cost of
$8 a Thousand.
PREMIUM TO BE PAID
FROM PAY OF MEN
Family Allowances to Become
One of the Largest Ex
penditures.
Washington, Aug. 10.—Au
thority to make effective the gov
ernment's program of insuring the
armed forces of the nation was
sought of congress today in bills
introduced in both houses by
Senator Simmons and Representa
tive Alexander. The proposed
legislation would provide insur
ance, at minimum cost, for Amer
ican soldiers, sailors and marines,
the insured men paying the prem
ium; families' allowances to de
pendents of men in the nation's
military or naval service; in
demnification for disabilities, and
the rehabilitation at government
expense of injured men.
A feature not previously announced
would make It compulsory for officers
and men to allot a minimum of $15
a month out of their pay to dependent
wives and children. These allotments
would l»e supplemented by family al
lowances to he made by the govern
ment of from $5 to $30 a month, ac
cording to the circumstances and
numbers of dependents
Disability Payment.
Liberal indemnities for partial and
total disability are included in thé
program, varying from $40 to $75 per
month minimum up to $200 a month
for higher officers. Insurance would
be written by the government on the
lives of the men at a rate of approx
imately $s per thousand in sums from
$1,000 to $10,000, the premiums pay
able in Installments.
The cost to the government as est l
(Continued on i*ags Fourteen.) "
IY IDE KILLED?
AT ED
London, Aug. 10.—An explosion and
fire in a big chemical works in East
Uondon List night wrecked the build
ing and killed or injured scores oC
workers. Thirteen bodies of work
men so far have l>eeu taken from the
ruins. A large number of injure!
have lw*en treated at the police sta
tions and other civil places. Bodies
are still t>cing searched for.
conda received a wound in her leg from
a revolver shot.
"I have no doubt that Chamberlain
was one of the four men who helped
Taylor in the holdup," declares the
sheriff In a letter to Sheriff John K.
O'Rourke.
Blevins, who was another of the
gang, is now serving a term in a fed
eral prison for postofflee robbery*.
Blevins after his arrest at Malta broke
Jail on May 8 and was recaptured May
25 at Saco, the same day that Cham
berlain was arrested. Blevins again
made his escape, only to be again cap
tured at Minot. N. D.. on May 28.
Afterwards Blevins pleaded guilty to
the robbery of a postofflee at Johnson
(Continued on !*age Fourteen.)

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