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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, August 11, 1917, Image 2

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FIVE WESTERN
SUTES MEET
Stewart Co-operates in Plans
for Suppression of In
ternal Disorder.
Portland, Ore., Aup. 11.—Governors
of five western states, Oregon, Wash
ington, Nevada, Montana and Idaho,
met here today in executive session
to plan for co-operation with the fed
eral government in its war work and
to organize for suppression of internal
disorders.
Gov. Ernest Bister of Washington,
president of the western governors'
conference, presided. Other state ex
ecutives attending were Gov. James
Withycombe, Oregon; Gov. Moses
Alexander, Idaho; Gov. Sam Stewart,
Montana, and Gov. Emmet Boyle, Ne
vada. Gov. Simon Bamberger of Utah
wired he would arrive late in the day.
Many problems afte on the program
for consideration. Governor Alexan
der of Idaho declared before the meet
ing: "The governors of the states
must impress upon the people the vital
necessity of sacrifice. We must form
ulate a common war policy and carry
it through. Every person must know
his duty and do that duty."
UNDERTAKERS.
a#5v
PROVOST—hi this city. Au«. 7. Will
inm Provost. The remains are at the
Sherman & Heed parlors. Notice of
funeral later.
O'NEIL—At Feeley, Mont, Aug. 8,
1917, William F. O'Neil, aged .17 years.
Funeral services at Sherman & Heed's
chapel Saturday evening, 6:30 o'clock.
The remains will be taken to Seattle
for interment.
TURNOUIST—Aug. fi, 1917, Erick, be
loved husband of Hilma Turnquist and
brother of Adolph Turnquist of Hock
ford, 111. Funeral services at Sherman
& Heed's chapel Sunday, Aug. 12, at
2 p. m.
NEWMAN—Aug. 9. 1917. William
Newman, son of William H. Newman of
Itiiby, Alaska, ami brother of George
H. Newman of Sacramento, Cal. Notice
of funeral later.
SHERMAN & REED
Undertakers and Emhafmera
AiUMobllt and Carriage Equipaient
111-135 East Broadway
Phone* 57 and i*
HART—Funeral services for the late
William H. Hart will be held at Rich
ards* funeral chapel tomorrow (Sun
day) afternoon at 2 o'clock, under the
auspices of Enterprise lodge. I. O. O. F.
The body will Ik* forwarded later to Ta
coma. Wash., for interment.
MORRIS—The remains of the late
Harry Morris, aged 26 years, who died
yesterday, are at Richards* parlors,
from where the funeral will take place
at 2 o'clock. Rev. .1. II Mitchell offici
ating. Interment in Mountain View
. cemetery.
CARD OF THANKS.
We wish to extend our heartfelt
thanks to all kind neighbors and
friends for their many kindly expres
sions of sympathy shown us in our late
bereavement, during the illness and at
the funeral of a beloved husband and
father. We also wish to thank those
who sent so many beautiful floral of
ferings.
MRS. CARE P. ANDERSON,
ELMER ANDERSON.
JOSEPH RÏCHARDS. I™
Funeral Directors and Embalm*»
Warrington Richards, Praa. and Mgr.
15-19 South Montana 8t.
Phone St7
HUGHES- The remains of J. F.
Hughes are at White's undertaking par
lors. Funeral notice will be in Monday
morning papers.
DAVIS— The funeral of the late Hen
ry Davis will be held Monday morning
at 10 o'clock, under the joint auspices'
of the Knights of Pythias and street i
car employes' union, at the Knights of !
Pythias hall. Interment in the Jew
cemetery.
8AM rTwHITE
LARR Y DU GGAN
R.ll.kl. ITnd.rt.k.i .ad Eaahili
Ml North M.la StrMt
Roll Pho*. nt
M. J. WALSH CO.
Fanera! Directors and Embalm era.
New Location Sf7-309 West Park Street
Automobile Equipment. Phone 85.
DANIELS & BILBOA
Uadertaker. and Embalm.r.
Aatoaiobll. and Carriage Equipment
Phone 588 125 Eut Pnrk Strut
Residence Phone S822-J
Ordre Alw.y. Open_
MONTANA CROPS NOW
62.8 PER CENT NORMAL
The Post's Washington Bureau.
Washington, D C., Aug. 11.—Baaed
on 100 per cent aa an average crop,
The department of agriculture today
-«admitted the combined condition of all
/<*rops In Montann this year to be 62.8
Ter cent.
SUBSCRIBE FQiTtHE POST
DIXIE PROJECT
IN LIMELIGHT
Road of Great Military Impor
tance, Say the
Officers.
The Post's Washington Bureau.
Washington. D. C., Aug. 11.—A de
cided impetus has been given to the
Dixie highway project and to other
proposals looking to the construction
of roads that can be used for military
purposes by letters that -have been
written to Judge N. N. Alison of the
Dixie Highway associa Mon by Secre
tary of War Baker and Maj. Gen.
Leonard Wood.
These eminent military authorities
are very anxious that such roads shall
be built. Secretary of War Baker
urges that every effort be made to
persuade the state and county au
thorities to complete through roads,
stating that their importance at this
time cannot be over-estimated.
"They can perform no more patriotic
service than this," is his closing in
junction.
General Wood writes: "I am par
ticularly interested in the effort you
are making to build up what is known
as the Dixie highway. It is very im
portant that the roads connecting the
various military cantonments should
be put in good condition for service."
The improvement of practically all
of the mileage of the Dixie highway
is highly important under the request
of the secretary of war that through
roads be completed for use in the
movement of troops and transporta
tion of food products und supplies. A
large part of the mileage of the high
way is covered by the urgent sugges
tion that the roads connecting the
various cantonments should be put in
good condition for service.
At the present time there are located
along the Dixie highway training
camps at Fort Sheridan. Chicago, and
Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis;
a large mobilization camp for the draft
.army under construction at Louisville,
Ky.; a large quartermaster's depot at
Jeffersonville, Ind., across the river
from Louisville; a large training camp
and mobilization cantonment at Chat
tanooga and another at Atlanta; a
large quartermasters depot at At
lanta; a mobilization cantonment for
national guards at Macon, Gu.. und
still another large national guard
enmp at Augusta. Ga. Jacksonville,
Fin., also probably will secure a camp
of some kind eventually.
With the possible exception of be
tween Louisville and Chattanooga, the
distances between the camps, canton
ments and quartermaster's depots
ments and quartermaster's depots
along the Dixie highway are such that
it would be practical from the stand
point of saving time, cost of trans
portation and economy of railroad cars
to haul a large part of the supplies
used by the various camps by motor
truck if the highway were placed*in
such condition as to he rated avail
able for military use. When the cost
of handling from wareroom to truck
and from truck to train, repeating the
handling on delivery, is considered, to
say nothing of the delay incident to
waiting on the schedule of freight or
express, the saving from a good road
from a military standpoint can easily
be seen. This does not take into con
sideration the value of such a highway
for the establishment of personal com
munication between the commanding
officers of the two camps, or its use
in combined maneuvers.
i
!
CONSTITUTIONALITY OF
NEW LA W TO BE TESTED
Supreme Court to Pass on Men
Convicted for Evading
Conscription.
Washington, Aug. 11.—A test of the
constitutionality of the conscription
law will come before the United States
supreme court on or before Aug. 24
with the docketing of a ease which will
probably be called for trial during the
court's fall term.
The case will come up on a writ of
error from Hie district court of north
ern Ohio, where Charles E. Ruthen
berg, recently socialist candidate for
mayor of Cleveland; Alfred Wagen -
net lit. Ohio state secretary of the so
ialist party, and Charles Baker, Ohio
state organizer of that party, were
-onvicted of having conspired to in
duce persons subject to the conscrip
tion act to evade that law. They were
sentenced to one year in the Canton
(O.) workhouse.
I
Efforts have been mnde In several
sections of the country by persons not
in sympathy with the conscription law
to raise funds with which to test the
law.
JUDGE TO FIX PRICE
OF COAL IN ILLINOIS
Chicago. Aug. 11.—Justice Orrin N.
Carter of the supreme court of Illinois
is to fix the price of coal in ids home
state.
Justice Carter's appointment came
as the climax to a hot fight over the
coal situation. Prices were deemed
exorbitant and early this week Gov.
F. O. IdOwden served an ultimatum on
the coal operators that they would
either fix reasonable prices or the
state would seize the mines and oper
ate them. He called the operators to
gether. w ho agreed last night to accept
the prices that Justice Carter may set
tle on.
JAPANESE NAVAL. UNITS
ALLIED FORCES
JOIN
Ixtndon, Aug. II.—Several Japanese
naval unite have Joined the allied
forcée In Atlantic waters, the Japanese
naval attache here announced today
MDLDERS' LEADER
REACHES BÜTTE
President of the International
Union Arrives From
Chicago.
J. D. Brown, president of the mold
ders' international union, reached Butte
today to assist the local molders* union
in its effort to get a readjustment of
the present wage schedule. President
Brown spent some time discussing the
metal trades schedule with President
James O'Brien of the State Metal
Trades council. Under that schedule
the molders at the mines receive $6
per day last month.
The demand for fi substantial in
crease foi the molders working in the
down town plants was intimated by
President Brown.
IT
AFTERNOON CONCERT.
1. March, "Milano Patriottica (new)
Di F. Huron
2. Selection, "Adele" ........... Lampe
Synopsis: Introducing Adele, Like
Swallows Flying, Is It Worth While?
Close Your Eyes. Strawberry and Cream,
When the Little Birds Are Sleeping.
Finale, Adele.
3. Hungarian Comedy......Keler-Bcla
4. (a) When You Are Truly Mine...
Dorothy Lee
(b) Only a Year Ago............
Fred G. Albers
5. Grand Sacred Potpourri.Raruhouse
6. Overture. Orpheus.......Offenbach
7. Turkish Patrol........ Th. Michaelis
8. Grand Selection Huguenots......
Meyerbeer
9. Home, Sweet Home, the World
Over ..................... Lampe
EVENING.
1. March (new) "The Elephant"....
J. Ord. Hume
2. Selection from Mcrcadantes Opera
Laurendeau
3. Fantasia, "The Pink Lady".......
Ivan CaryII
"Attila," from G. Verdi's Opera..
Tohniti
Waise Fascination.. .Frank II. Gray
INTERMISSION.
Overture, Seinirnmide (by re
quest) ...................Rossini
6 Vt. March. "Montana" ...Alf Pay liter
(a) Intermezzo Hermosillo.. .Schub
(b> The Missouri Waltz (by re
quest) ........Fred Knighi Logan
8. La Relie France, Overture -on
Popular French Melodies......
Laurendeau
Arahisquc Fantasia...........Olker
"Star Spangled Banner."
.1.1. VINCENT,
dv. Musical Director.
PATRICK MORGAN WEDS
AAISS KATE O'LEARY
Pretty Wedding is Celebrated
This Morning at Sacred
Heart Church.
Patrick Morgan, a well known young miner
at the Badger State, was marrie«! Uiin morn
ing at Sacred Heart church by the Rev.
Father Faley to Mish Kate O'Leary. Mr.
and Mm. Morgan have left for a tour of the
»täte for their honeymoon and on their re
turn will make their home in Butte, where
the young people are well known and held
in the highest regard by ail their friends.
The groom was accompanied by Barney
Morgan, his brother, and the bride waa ac
companied by Miss Nell Sullivan. There was
quite a number of the friends of the young
people at the wedding and many handsome
and exiiensive presents were given the young
j»eoph* in token of the high steem in which
thy are held.
LEAVING OF CONSCRIPT
MEN TO BE A GALA DAY
The Post's Washington Bureau.
Washington, D. C„ Aug. 11.—Provost
Marshal General Crowder has pre
pared a telegram to he sent to Gov
ernor Stewart of Montana, suggesting
that the calling of the first contingent
of drafted soldiers to the colors next
month be made a holiday and gala oc
casion in Montana.
COUNTY WILL EMPLOY
NO I. W. W. MEMBERS
Duluth, Minn., Aug. 11.— Commission
rs of St. Louis county, Minn., the
ounty in which Duluth is located, to
day adopted a resolution barring from
inploy ment by the county any person
onneeted with the I. W. W. About
200 men will be affected.
HEIRS NOT APPRISED
CONCERNING RIGHTS
Fred Trabant in a petition filed with
Judge Dwyer today says that he is one
of the heirs of the S. Marches seau es
tate and tliut although upwards of one
r has elapsed since letters of ad
ministration were issued the heirs have
not b â ta appraised of their rights. He
asked for a hearing in the matter. The
judge set Oct. 20 as the time and di
rected that all parties interested ap
pear at that time on an order to show
ause why the prayer of the petition
should not be grunted.
I
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MOTOR TRUCK BILL
Washington. Aug. 11. Postmaster
General Burleson was authorized by a
bill passed in the senate today to ex
periment in motor truck delivery of
foodstuffs from producer to consumer.
An appropriation of $100,000 was mnde.
The bill must now pass the house.
CALENDAR MONDAY.
Judge J. J. Lynch will bold a law
and motion calendar session of his
court Monday morning at 10 o"cloek.
Miss Florence Colby left this morn
ing on the Great Northern for Belton,
Mont. ,
j
j
A large pércentag
e of
Le county
Physical exemptions
were n
nie on tlie
grounds of flat feet
anion
tlie men.
Eye and ear troubles
were
iext in im
portance, teeth were
third
n the nmt
ter of exemptions a
id lien
rt troubles
were a low fourth.
The
hoard on
Monday will post in
tlie «•<•
complete list of all
ten p!
ysically fit
CIÏÏ MUD IMS
The Exemption List Growing.
Second Call Necessary
to Fill Quotas.
day by tlie board, ho It is impossible
to estimate the possible number of
exemptions in the city.
Must Make Second Call.
There is no hope, members of both J
boards say, of getting the quotas from
the first call of men. With the pres
ent rate that men are appearing the
ity will examine but 1,125 men from
the 1,500 called. Using «•ounty figures |
upon the city's lists, one-fourth of that
number will be physically exempt,
leaving 844. Of this number approxi
mately 50 per cent will claim exemp
tion. If 9o per cent of these exemp
tions are allowed, only 455 men will bo
certified into Ute army from the first
1,500 called. The city's quota is 791.1
Final examination of papers by the
county board this morning ended in
the certification of 155 men as physi
unfit for army service and a
more whose fitness is not yet de
termined. In the examination of men |
on the first day the physical exemp
tions were not in excess of 1 r. per cent.
The men examined Tuesday, however,
showed a total of almost i or cent
of exemptions.
Many Have Flat Feet
or unfit for mllitar
same day they will tum th<- an-1
nouncement of exemptions be use of
tendency and alienage
The 15 men who an* aiding City
Physician Matthews with the city ex- I
mlnations are: Drs. I'm: ten, P. ll.i
McCarthy, D. J. Donohue . Frisbee, A.
C. Knight. J. F. Borghoff, A. John
son, T. B. Moore, Graham Biddle. II.
tan, W. C. Hauser. Maillet, J.
B. Freund. M. J. Scott and Corporal
Schvatke of the army.
City's Plan
The city's plan «if examinai - n is'
'ffieiency to the highest «Line Men I
start in at one of the big com,, i
■hambers and stop at the nth» < : l
vith their examinations complete.
There is no delay and no ologgin-: of
mining machine Dr. Mat
thews is superintending H. work of |
the other
work of |
the other physicians.
Men who were passed i tin- county
this morning as physical!; unfit for
the army are given in the list below.
All names n«>t in this list are cer
tified as accepta Me iov the army as
jhygical fitness goes. Those
exempted because of physical unfit
ness are:
Willard J. Baxter, 2984; John W. Wickctt.
1070: Anthony Serdirh, 14.4; John Me In net. !
1369 : .loaoph Yager, 2675 ; William Scully, 98
Paul Subic. 2699; Arthur H. Hawkins, 30', !>
Abraham HohkIi nd. 2607 : Vi«-tor Anderson, I
2603 ; George O'Brien. 350 ; Joahua Snell, 1032 !
Frank P. Dugay, 2439 : George B. Bowden! I
2590; Francia A. Peck, 2102; fhomaa C. Mc
Canley, 2616; Arthur R. Peterson, 2749; James !
O'Brien, 606 ; Harry Helman, 43 ; John Mc
Nulty, 674: Frank Allen. 3273; Tony Pavlina«
2322 ; Percy Cad«ly. 2549 ; John Rertoglio, 1572 !
John J. Chiuiniuatto. 1891 ; Bude Gcrich, 676
James Loughlin, ^684; Edward J. Rule. 2936
James McCarthy, 337; Charles McG. Stewart,
2166; Remo Radmilovich. 637; Patrick Caul
field. 1142; Humphrey Lynch. 1102; Carl V.
G inter, 2765 ; Emmet J. McKay, 2955; Maurice
Cantlon. 2247; Ivan Brozovich, 1808 ; Andrew
Brnadich, 2204; John Sterne. 2343; Joseph
Molenaek, 2662; William Maudlin, 1118; Don
Radmovich, 656 ; Robert Vukovich, 660 ; Georg*
Kranatx, 2186; Steve Hajari. 363; Clyde Lucas,
2646; Karl A. Wickersheim. 121; Blaine Fir
nouth, 1783; John Hazzani. 797; John It
Williams. 221 ; Theodore M. Adams, 3025 .
Dennis Lynch, 711; Carl Wiekstrom. 2177
James Tackney, 1517; Dane Brak us. 433;
Francis J. Hawdeti to ; Constantin Genie, 3369
Mott A. Cron«-. 2558; James Geach. 2124
Joseph Turk. 1956; Desales F. McGuire, 306,
William D. Bunney. 1817; Patrick Touey, 642
peter Rubatto, 1873. W. O. Craddock. 3319;
A1 frt»d Rutort. 1565; Hannibal Berryman. 1288
S. W. Olson. 2833; William Trythall. 2376
Hamid Anholt, 3334 ; James Magor. 1674 :
James McIntyre. 841; George H. Symons
1054; Thomas H. Harvey. 3100; John H
Blewett, 11; John M. Harrington. 3084; Mike
J. Callahan, 8009; Allan A. O'Brien 355
Axel Nelson. 343; Arthur II. Pearce. 1417 •
Fred Barkle, 1281 ; Kdward M Lenihan. 1067 ':
Michael J. Rogera, 1016 ; Harry Stewart 1217 •
Pat F. Sullivan. 103 ; J.mo» Sullivan luf.7
J "''J 1 Trihey. 112 . John W Matth»«-«!
166, ; Harvey II. Griffin, 154: Tlionm» Nichcl
345 : Prier Schutte . 2592 : Charte» Rnllyrirr'
2495: Victor Viljakkuln. 566: Hat*y Stevens
1187: George Koval. 168: flarvla Toganjiu-'
705: Mike J. Kelly, 866: Antonio Price..
1728. Victor Holmi, 2623: John O'Connell
(number unknown 1 : Nmim Tanioff. 2816:
Samuel J. Hancock. 2152 : Isaac Dodyv,,,,
3249; Vmeenao Terrien. 212; John E. Svitkov.
Ich. 2842: William H. William». 222: A Trsn
18,1,m. 17.4: .lullu, Ooirye, 1924: Anton
( hn»ten»on. 2886 : Omni» Sullivan. 383 ; Kiel,,
nrd H. Bray, 944: John Simonich. 2922: Rrl,
ert Mathann. 2853; Michael t'urnow. 8015; Pat
J. Lynch, 1103: William D Gllfeather. 2128
Orren R. Finley. 2758: Thoma» Paul. 191
Fred Loveneie, 175: J Marlin Fleming. 1167
Peter A. Weatlln. 2005; M. G. Samiek, 2366:
Sherman Dodyaon. 3257. Pemoa Guat. 2884:
R S. Booth. 2088: Vinrent Gineolettn. 1752:
R -- Thoma». 2871: Ivter Piakolich. 2938
iWilUam J. Boyle. 979: Patrick Englieh. 738;
I Daniel Shea. J092 : Ru-hard Treziae. 1511 - John
iBahur. 67.; John Malenaek. 2281: Milkan
Gare«.. 758 : Jamca J McKean, 945; George
I F, Ro ' 1, Franc ta. 749 ; George K
1 Irion. 1631 : Terrene. J Kinaella. 46; | v , I
, Hantai» .83 . Ralph H. Kldrrkin. 2081: p„t
Jordan. 806 ; William KIM. 2441: Mike Lynch. |
i}g Tf?"" r : O Hearn: Samuel E. Hambly. I
:.J 32 ' ■ J,lhn Remiti. 1430;
Ed«,ard Wnld„ n . 530; Giovanni Coeradin. 1617 ;
'2^;°' 1 ' 74 - Callnaher.
U i : "»»I860. 1091: Fred Moe. 3053
The fell., w,"y have been certified na
doubtful of paaamir the phyeieal teeta. Their I
raaea «ill he taken up aaain tomorrow morn
iny and finally aetlled bv the board i Sell, '
Powmmr. 1419 : Alfred p Tbomaa. 107 : Telfer
Sm wilt IB- """'7, JMcHwh. 664; Will
HÜLktr JAÎ ' Ha-aa'v. 775 : John
Hawkins. 3206. John F. Bowtlt-n R • Tune,
>5"«: Victor Pi,-,,, d. 2941: Howard K
vïéoli 'îîà M ^ ntr " n| A- 3376: Alfoneo
Vccoli. 435. Charles W Oberon 210Ö- Frani
Consoni. 18ft ; Ralph Ranzo, 700* ' W
MINER IS INJURED.
Hohen McDonald, H miner, a end 67
year*, was severely Injured early thla
morning when he waa struck and
dragged several feel by an automobile
on Anaconda rond while he was going
to work at the Anaconda mine. He
was taken to St. James' hospital, where
j his wounds were dressed He received
about Hie body. He rooms at the
j Braund house.
GOING?—OH, MY,
Butte Clerks' Union Eleventh
P I C N I
TO BE HELD AT DILLM0NT PARK
aTN commercial day
DILLON 1 This Coming Wednesday
AUGUST 15™
Large list of athletic sports provided—Generous cash prizes to the w i
Dancing in the big pavilion which contains the best dance floor in southern
tana—two orchestras to furnish music continuously—Loads of Fun fore
BAND CONCERT AFTERNOON AND EVEN!
BY THE FAMOUS MONTANA STATE BAND
TRAINS LEAVE
—Oregon Short Line Railroad
depot, Butte, a& follows:
First train leaves at 7:00 a. in.
Second train leaves at 7:20 a. m.
Third train leaves at 9:00 a. m.
--v
Round Trip Rates
Adults ............$1.50
• Children ............75c
V_ /
RETURNING
First train leaves at (:tt
Second train leaves at ll:i
Stub train at Dillon to
from tit«- park every 30
15«- for tin round trip.
EVERYBODY IS INVITED-DON'T YOU MISS
GET YOUR TICKETS THE EVENING BEFORE
—at the uptown ticket office of the Oregon Short Line Railroad company,
ner Park and Main streets. Office open until 9 p. m. Tuesday evening.
THREATEN ED STRIKE
Feared That 17.000 in Ken
tucky and Tennessee Will
Quit Tonight.
n«»xville, Tenn., Aug. 11. — Seven
i thousand bituminous miners in
n Kentucky and Tennessee
d are threatening to strike when
mines close tonight. Many failed
i cptw t for work today and every
ie in tlie field will be affected. Con
•nces between mine owners ami
l»n.gr<
late
to
The miners asks f«»r' an eight
day. more pay and recognition of
WAEKEBVILEE NOTES
Mr. ond Mrs. Ed Grimes and family
of ir.00 North Main street left this
morning for Helmville, where they in
tend to remain for a month.
Dai
tting
110 West Dalv
street is confined to his h«»me from ill
ness.
Mil
* a, 'l and Laura Pierce, 1
t oia teirace, returned to their home
yesterdiiy after a pleasant visit with
friends and relatives outside of Hutte.
Mrs. G. J Stephens, wife of the pas
or of the Mount Bethel Methodist
Episcopal church, and children re
turned last night from an extended
trip through Iowa and Minnesota.
vUure they visited relatives.
L E. Morton of Boise, Ida., is a re
cent arrival In Watkervtlle.
Pierce Carney of 131 West Daly
street left yesterday for Spokane
TersUy Wl " re ' < '" ,<>r a ° n *>K» unl-
-'! rK ' H E Bubo and Mrs.
lea , m0t er ' ,virs Martin , left yes.
m,? n° r " m0t0r ,rl l' through the
Hitter.Root va, ley. going by way of
Miss M at tide I.aUtnde has returned
mer at wXrh>T ,h "
"111 Visit here forborne* time" "* 8nd
visit in Michigan a ? 1 m ' mthl1 '
.evening was spent in W v en *
spent in games, music and
J
I
j
I
1
I
dancing. At a lato hour a delicious
luncheon was served, after which the
hapl»y young people departed for their
nomes. Those present were: Misses
Florence Walsh, Agnes, Ruth and
Dorothy Meehan, Martha Gallagher,
Agnos Loughlin, Anna Sullivan, Ethel
Walsh, Eva Harrington, Gertrude
Sheehan, Teresa Caldwell and the
hostess, Miss Ruth McGlynn; Messrs.
Dewey McGeehan, Joe O'Donnell, Hugh
J Duran, Tom McGlynn, James Walsh,
I Fd Matthews. Thomas Trainor, Pat
j Fleming. Gerald Harrington, Gus
Bolton, Irving Farrell, Dan Callahan,
I William Leary, William Mayher,
1 Maurice Mulcahy, John Ilackett, Car
I roll McGlynn, William Peoples, Jean
1 ynell, Peter Carbrey, Mr. and Mrs.
J- Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mc
Glynn, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Warren.
Fila Hurley of North Main street,
an employe of the Symons company,
and Sam Morris, a former resident of
W alkerville, were married in Seattle
several days ago, according to infor
mation received this morning by
friends in Walkerville.
Miss Florence Walsh of 18 Gladstone
terrace, accompanied by her grand
mother, Mrs. Julia Shea, will leave to
morrow evening for Hancock, Mich.,
where they intend to remain for the
balance «if the summer, visiting friends
and relatives.
Harry Martin of 1022 North Main,
who was injured while at work some
time ago, is able to be about again.
ASK CONGRESS TOM
I. W. W. ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page One.)
tions he lmd received from ihe Clear
water I.umher company nnd its em
ployes In his state In which the em
ploies said they did not want to strike
hut «'ere threatened with violence by
(he I. \\. w. should they not do so.
Both the company and the employes,
the Washington senator said, were
agreed on the principle of the eight
hour day In lumber camps. He lntro
ur ed a bill establishing an eight-hour
day for all lumbering and wood-work
ing plants whose products find their
way into interstate commerce.
Senator Hollis said that while state
»Pd municipal authorities were ex
pected to handle ordinary violations
of law hy ,he 1. w. W„ the federal
government should step In and he
asked senators to study the questions
carefuHy so that some legislation could
be enacted to reach the trouble.
FELONY CHARGE.
Boren Grt ; el, **' a * '» under arrest, at
fense À C w ar ,îl d wi,h a statutory of
e ènV„« A . sh r fPs "Uiccr wi" leave this
cilv I. 'fi brln * the men back to this
Denât. r the . COI ï pl " nt issned hy Chief
Deputy (.ounty Attorney N. A Hoterinu
?s n<l char?ed V F ,? nk RiIc > - - C.rcenblat
,, v ™ ,* , h « f*lony and will be
tier Do?.^ l "lK rS ' h " rln * before Jns
this r "1 U *" o Greenb,at was ,n
J he lived at 845 Utah avenue.
Improving After Col
Kansas, But is I
Very III.
hoffC
Clay Center, Kan., Aug- U
President William H. Taft
good night and today
Improvement in the
confined him to
early Tuesday,
nonuced that he wuscont
«MMftrishnit-nt »nd wa8
cidedly better. '
Mr. Tan h s determin
alf his apeaking engage
remainder of this m"ntf
of the Unite»! States,,
will go to his Fiirnnutf
Au Pic. Quebec, ('ana
Morgan, his physician,
Taft might have here
six days if he continued w
he has recently.
Rates for Heads of
as Provided in Bil
to Senate by Fi
mittee.
Washington. Au f- n '
table shows i be
b*3 collected upon
of married persona a*
by fhe bill nr* before
compared with the P
Present law.
Income of Total tax.
$1,200
1.500..
2,000
2.600..
3.000. .
3.500..
4.000
5.000.
7.000
10,000
12,000.
16,000 ..
20 . QQ0 .
30.000
60.000
76 . 000 ..
100.000
160.000
200 , 000 ..
250 . 000 .
300.000
400 . 000 . .
600.000 .
«00,000
700.000 .
800.000
900.000
1 , 000 . 000 .
10 , 000.000
J-f
11.420
20.920
31.920
42.920
54.920
«6,920
79.920
90.920
102.920
1 . 437.920
4 . 437.920
14 , 937,920
dÜHOLD TWO

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