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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, August 24, 1917, Image 1

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THER FORECAST
.Tonight: Fair and warmer.
Fair and cooler.
5. NO. 203.
Wyt glitte 23atlp iPoöt.
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Generally fair tonight and
Saturday; warmer tonight east portion;
ROinewhat cooler Saturday.
BUTTE MONTANA. FRIDAY. AUGUST 24. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
IKE AT ANACONDA SMELTER MEANS GENERAL SHUTDOWN
■' - - ' '"J 1 » I . h i. ..... I . — ■
re l '^n 15,000 Men Directly Affected by Action Forced on Anaconda Co.
ON PREDATED BY
LL AND SMELTERMEN
AT THE WASHOE WORKS
rawn and Furnaces Tapped By Small
Force That Reported For Work
This Morning
e of Labor Troubles Brought on by I. W.
gitators Who Became Active in June,
pbell and Associates Lose Out in Butte,
Accomplish Object Through Anaconda
and Smeltermen—Shutdown Cuts Off the
rnment's Supply of Copper.
se of the strike of smeltermen at the Washoe
t Anaconda the Anaconda Copper Mining com
'ay announced a general shutdown of its proper
his state. All the mines of the company will be
own, together with the smelters at Anaconda and
alls. Other mines that depend upon these smel
be compelled to close. Altogether a total of more
,000 men will be directly affected. The day shift
'employed as usual at the Butte mines today, but
ers will work tonight. The fires are being
nd furnaces tapped at Anaconda. The Great Falls
will continue to operate until the ores in transit
>n disposed of. In a few days the smelter there
own. The shutdown in Butte and Anaconda is
e fact that the tnen did not report for work at
Iter today. Three thousand men are ordinarily
d at the Washoe works; this morning only 110 re
or duty and nothing was left for the company to
o make immediate pr eparations for closin g down .
min^s are without facili
orinß oro, and with the
t of business mining has to
In addition to the mines
•onda company the proper
1 Tuolumne and of other con
ship ore to Anaconda are
ni. Included among those
t are thus affected will bo
of the Elm Orlu, a Clark
Uhat produces copper. Thc^
Superior will work as lonR
It does not ship to Ana
fcreat Falls.
[1.000 men In Hutte and Ana
I be directly affected bv the
addition 2,000 men at
soon be out of work
Ï the shutdown, together with
«»roe of railroad men and
se employment depends dl
the activities of the mines,
miners will be affected and
'.rmen will also feel the ef
he strike at once,
developments are the direct
of the activities of Tom
Joe Shannon and other
the Metal Mine Workers'
t Butte, which, several weeks
rtook to Involve the smelter
nda. When the proposition
was put before the Interna
Mill and Smelter
at Anaconda a few more than
'y of them favored a walk
er the rules of the union a
vote is required to declare
Many of the members of the
not vote, and of those who
»t one-half voted against a
In the meantime, the Ana
ion failed to ratify the new
by the company. The
Us smeltermen did accept tha.
on their last pay day their
based on a scale of $4.50
Although there was dissat
among the mill and smelt
Anaeonda because the local
Ion had not accepted the new*
thus made the higher wages
ely avtylable. it was apparent
s no general disposition
aders Are Adroit.
couraged by the situation in
the L W. W. leaders in
rtinued to work with a view
~>ng a sentiment against the
On Wednesday night Camp
II non and others from Butte
control of a meeting
n in Anaconda Some of th^
ives were ejected and at once
als in possession of the hall
to form a new' union
'ote was taken on the strike
n and it was reported to have
A strike was thereupon an
cet car men in Anaconda be
the Mill and Sineltermen'L
some of the operative«
« call to strike issued by the
n nd yesterday the service In
was crippled. Yesterday
the smelter had 76 per cent
rew por the afternoon shift
er had less than 20 per cent
crew and last night for the
tinued on Pag« tight.)
UNCLE Si TO
BUILD 1,270
Tonnage to Aggregate Nearly
8,000.000—Need a Bil
lion Dollars.
Washington, Aug. 24.—The govern
ment's shipbuilding program calls for
total of 1,270 ships of 7,069.000 ton
nage, it was revealed today in esti
mates the shipping board has sent to
Secretary .McAdoo on which to base a
request for a new billion-dollar appro
priation.
This is in addition to nearly 2,000,000
tons of shipping now building in the
American yards which has been com
mandeered by the emergency fleet
corporation. A large part of the gov
ernment fleet and of commandeered
fleet will have been completed by the
end of the fiscal year, June 30, 1918.
Building, commandeering and pur
chases of vessels will total about
$2,000.000.000. Estimates of the entire
cost of construction are given as fol
lows:
The Cost.
Contracts already let. 433 ships of
1,919,200 tons, $285,000.000; contracts
ready to let, 425 ships of 2,968,000 tons,
$455,500,000; under negotiation, 327
ships of 1,281,000 tons, $194,000.000;
150 miscellaneous vessels of 1.800,000
tons, $300.000.000; construction of gov
ernment-owned fabricating yards, $35,
000 , 000 .
Commandeering will cost $515,000,000
(Continued on Fuse Seven.)
PUBLIC MUST lit
BLNLFITJFCOIL CUT
Food Administrator Garfield
Gives Warning of His
Purpose.
Washington. Aug. 24.—Harry A.
Garfield, coal administrator, gave
warning today that ah the machinery
of the government will be used to
carry the benefits of prices the presi
dent has fixed on coal through to the
consumer, and that if necessary to ac
complish this end the government will
take over the mines.
Mr. Garfield warned the public that
the government would not have its
purposes thwarted on any technical
grounds.
SCENE AT FARMERS' PICNIC
AT BEAUTIFUL TEWEY RANCH
t*
m
WHEN THE DANCING BEGAN AT THE DEER LODGE VALLEY FARMERS' CELEBK \TION.
Tlie gathering of the farmers of the Deer Lodge valley at the Dan Tewey ranch on the Deer Lodge road yesterday was
the greatest event in the organization's history. There were nearly 10,000 people present. It was an enthusiastic gath
ering. The patriotic addresses were cheered and the loyaltv of the great crowd was plainly apparent at every oppor
tunity. The picture shows a view of the dancing pavilion through the trees from the highway.
15 Persons Killed When Negro
at Houston Start Shooting Up
Regulars
the Town
Soldiers Incensed by Alleged
Mistreatment at Hands of
Police Arm Themselves, Fire
on Their Officers and Kill
and Wound Many Persons in
the City.
Houston, Tex., Aug. 24.—More
than 100 negro soldiers of the two
companies of the Twenty-Fourth
infantry which engaged in a riot
last night and caused the death of
16 and the wounding of more than
a score of persons are being sought
today by strong patrols of regulars
and Illinois national guardsmen
under the command of General
John A. Hulen, governor of the
city, now under martial law.
Three cum punies of coast artillery
regulars from Fort Crockett rein
forced the 1,000 or more Illinois
guardsmen today and order which was
restored early this morning is being
maintained. Roll call this morning by
Major Snow in command of the bat
talion of negroes showed 125 men were
absent. Eighteen of these surrendered
and others are being rounded up by the
military patrols as the search of the
negro districts progresses.
May Pay Death Penalty.
Under military law, it is stated,
soldiers may be shot for having mu
tinied and tired on their officers.
The rioting, according to best ac
counts available, was caused by ill
feeling bred among the negroes
through the treatment accorded
some of them by city police officials.
As military police, the negroes pa
trolled the environs of the city when
members of the battalion were released
from the camp on pass.
Several minor clashes occurred be
DEAD IN RACE RIOT
OF NEGRO SOLDIERS
Houston, Texas, Aug. 24.— Th«
death list resulting from rioting of
negro soldiers of the Twenty-fourth
infantry last night reached 17 this
afternoon when H. A. Thompson of
Hempstead, Texas, succumbed to
bullet wounds he received when the
negroes fired into his automobile.
THE DEAD.
Ira D. Rainey, mounted police of
ficer.
Rufe Daniela, mounted police of
ficer.
Middle-aged man named Smith.
S. Satton, barber.
Capt. J. W. Mattes, Battery A,
second field artillery.
E. J. Meineke, police officer.
Horace Moody, police officer.
Earl Finley.
A. R. Carstens, painter.
Manuel Garredo.
Frederick E. Winkler.
Vida Henry, negro sergeant.
Bryant Watson, negro soldier,
Company K, Twenty-fourth infan
try.
M. D. Evertson, member of a lo
cal artillery battery.
C. W. Wright.
tween the white police and the mili
tary, the latest preceding the riot re
sulting In the arrest of the two negro
soldiers for interfering when a white
police officer arrested a negro woman.
How it Began.
The trouble is said to have been be
gun late yesterday after some of the
negro soldiers had complained of treat
ment accorded them by members of
the Houston poHcs force. About »
(Continued on Pi,
Texas Members of Congress
Demand Instant Removal of
Negro Troops From That
State. War Department An-
nounces No Action Will Be
Taken Until Investigation.
- I
Washington, Aug. 24.—Senator
Sheppard of Texas, after a confer
ence with Secretary ltaker today
announced that the negro troops
concerned in the rioting at Hous
ton would be withdrawn from
Texas immediately. Later Secre
tary Raker after reading first of
ficial reports announced that he
could take no action of any kind
until the affair had been in
vestigated fully.
Secretary Baker also said that the
Houston affair did not affect the
policy of training negro troops in the
south.
It is within the Jurisdiction of the
commander of the southern depart
ment to move the troops to any other
point in his territory without orders
from Washington.
Official Reports.
official reports on the troop rioting
at Houston began arriving at the war
department early today and were hur
ried to Secretary Baker as fast as they
came in. They were coming from the
commanding general of the southern
department whose Investigation pos
sibly may be supplemented by a spe
cial Inquiry by the Inspector general
of the army as the affair is regarded
as moat serious, particularly In view of
the fact that the negro troops con
cerned were regulars and not national
guardsmen or drafted troops new to
regular army discipline.
The similarity of the occurrence to
(Continued on Page Eleven.)
BLOODY HILL 304
AGAIN IS HELD BY
FRENCH SOLDIERS
Field on Which Thousands of
Men Have Died Restored
to Republic.
ALL VERDUN POSITIONS
HAVE BEEN RECOVERED
Portuguese Troops Fighting
With British on Flan
ders Line.
THE WAR SUMMARY.
in a brilliant attack this morning on
Verdun front the French carried j
H ill 304. one of the most bitterly dis- j
puted positions of the war, in tha ]
struggle for which thousands of^ men j
n to Hill 304 stormed the fortified ;
cs between Haucourt and Bethin
have lost their lives. The French ad
vanced to an average depth of one
quarter mile over the sector between (
Avocourt .vood and Dead Man Hill,
Paris announces officially, and in ad- j
çj j 0 _ t. i_j ; 11 oaa . 4 ..___ a iL. r....4 I
works
court.
The French are now masters of all
the Important points on the Verdun
front which they held before the be
ginning of the great German attack
last year.
On British Line.
On the British front the bitter fight
for possession of Lons was continued
during the night. «The official British
statement announces that the British
now hold German trenches immediate
ly northwest of the green crassier to
the south of Lens and that especially
heavy losses have been inflicted on
the Germans. Portuguese troops.
^yhicti are holding a sector in north
west France, repulsed German raids in
the vicinity of La Basse. Heavy ar
tillery fighting continues around
Ypres, where the British have im
proved their positions and success
fully withstood counter attacks.
FIERCE BATTLE FOUGHT
F«R POSSESSION OF A
SLAG HEAP AT LENS
British Front In Franco and Bel
gium, Aur. 24.—(By the associa tod
press.) — Heavy fighting proceeded
throughout the night in the southwest
edge of Lons for possession of the
great slag heap known as the Green
Grassier, from the crest of which the
Canadians broke through lute yester
day after having a footing on it all
day.
The British this morning were con
tinuing the battle from positions which
they had seized immediately northwest
of the Grassier and the Germans were
making strenuous efforts to re-estab
'Continued
Three. >
ESCAPE FROM PRISON BV
CRAWLI NG DOWN SEWER
Two Convicts Go 400 Yards
Through Pipe—Saw the
Bars at End.
Leavenworth. Kan., Aug. 24.-— Joseph
Campbell and James Thomas Vere still
at large today after escaping from the
federal penitentiary last night by
crawling through a sewer 400 yards
and sawing off steel liars across the
end of it.
Campbell was brought here from
Alaska, where he was sentenced for
the killing of two brothers to gain
possession of a gold mine Thomas
was convicted for robbery of the
postotfice at Nemaha, Neb.
WORK OF CITY BOARD TO
BE CO MPLETED MONDAY
Secret Service Men Aid Ex- 1
emption Examiners by Run- !
ning Down Much Evidence.
One Hundred Fail to File
Their Affidavits.
Work 1 of the city exemption board on
the hearing of exemption claims is
finished witli the exception of 100
cases that are being investigated by
government secret service men and
city detectives. The exemption claims
will have been completely passed upon
by next Monday night, it is expected.
"The work of the secret service men
is a distinct aid to us." said one board
WILL BE SENT
TO FRANCE SOON
The Third Rainbow Division of
Guardsmen to Be Trained
in Europe.
MAY SEE SALT WATER
BEFORE SEPTEMBER 15
Militiamen Among Best Trained
of National Guard
Troops.
T1 "' Post 's Washington Bureau,
Washington, Aug. 24. A third
rainbow division of TlOrthwest
cm guardsmen from Idaho, Mon
tana, Washington. Oregon and
Wyoming will be rushed to France
as soon as possible.
fercnt train j ng camp8 wjthin h
, , 0 r .
last week, now are practically as
sured of service
..
Members of the Second Mofl
tana infantry, assigned to two dif
«
France with
little, if any, preliminary training
in this country.
At first assigned to train at Palo
Alto, Cal., they were ordered yester
day to accept Charlotte, N. C., as
thefr training center. Today's orders
are taken by army men to mean that
final training of Montana guardsmen
will he «lone in France.
A "rainbow" division is raised by
drawing troops from states Included
within a certain curved area. The
last "rainbow" division was made up
of troops of New England men on the
cast and Kansas men on the west,
the two states representing the limit«
of the rainbow curve. The northwest- -
ern division may include troops from
a half dozen or more western states
and some of the mlddlewest.
The term "as soon as possible"
means that the troops will leave
American soil possibly before the mid
dle of September, according to local
guardsmen. The Second Montana In
fantry is rated as one of the best
trained of guardsmen regiments and
will need but little training to put it
into shape for the trenches in Europe.
IS LOANED TO RUSSIA
Plan to Rush Supplies in Be
fore Ice Closes the
Harbor.
Washington, Aug. 24.—Another credit
of $100,000,000 to Russia was made to
day by the American government.
This brings the total of credits ex
tended to the Russian government to
$275,000.000.
Ambassador Bakhmeteff, in confer
ences with Secretary McAdoo, pointed
out the necessity of rendering aid
speedily so that needed supplies might
be sent to Russia before the « losing of
her ports by ice.
Some of the money probably will he
used to purchase railway supplies and
equipment in this country.
REICHSTAG PARTIES
TO HOLD CONFERENCE
London, Aur. 24.—a Berlin dispatch
received via CoponhaRen sayB it ia un
derstood Dr. Michaeli«, the German
imepria! chancellor, und other parties
in the relchstaR are negotiating with
a view to summoning their leading
rcpresentutHes to a conference Tor the
consideration of important questions.
1 member this morning. "Not a few
! ~e' on of ei
detectives and secret service men. We
have found attempts to obtain ex
emption by means of exaggerated or
incorrect statements. There Is little
doubt that arrests will grow out of
the evidence that has been collected
for us."
One exemption claim has been de
nied, the board hearing that the ap
plicant was married 24 hours after he
had riled claim for exemption on the
ground of a dependent wife. The
woman who offered to "net" as his '
Wife became frightened and a mar
riage was consummated to evade
(Continued on Page Eight.)

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