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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, August 25, 1917, Image 1

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THER FORECAST
Tonight: Fair and warm«r.
Pair and warmer.
5. NO. 204.
WEATHER FORECAST
MONTANA—Generally fair tonight
Sunday; somewhat cooler Sunday <
and aouth portions. _ _
BUTTE MONTANA. SATURDAY. AUGUST 25. 1917
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
■mm
OIL
k
rquin Holds Virais
tion Company f*at
t is Violated.
ION AND AN
OUNTING TO COME
t After Years of Lit
May Involve Mil
ns of Dollars.
ision handed down this
Judge George M. Bour
e United States district
'ared in favor of the
eparation company in
gainst the Butte and
ining company for in
of patent on a process
ation in ore separations,
on granting the prayer
"ntiff's bill may on final
( made to act as an in
against the Butte and
(company from further
oil flotation system of
'tion and grants an ac
;to the Minerals Separa
any. If this accounting
Jn the basis of royalties,
several millions of dol
be involved. It is ex
t a separate suit will be
to cover the accounting.
I will be taken by the
Superior company.
pinion delivered by Judge
] 08 t of the written matter
kr to discussion of tephni
Sf the suit. The court re
ess by which the ore is
ncl goes into detail con
[amounts of oil necessary in
profess. Especially does
i.scuss the difference in
oil noted in the patent and
used by the defendant
refarance, to this differ
•cting the fringibtllty of
! Use of Oil.
ent Is limited to the use
of I percent of oil, that
an be operated,*'ith 1 per
ore. is not material to va
Vh it may be to infringe
if a patentee limits his
ariiy or because he does
e extent of his invention,
s through excess and the
rçilid to the extent of the
t practically admits that
the present amount of oil
avoid the patent. It is
I I s counsel in argument, be
ipreme court has said It Is
•' to use less than H per
of abundance of caution
than 1 per cent.
Avoid Infringement.
t uses the patent process,
laintiffs invention of ore
il DIOCESE DEID
n re,. Aug. 25.—Rt. Rev.
Joseph Glorieux, Catholic
See of Boise. Idaho, died
"1 here early today after
f three weeks,
ediate cause of death was
For two days he had
g rapidly, and since late
ud been unconscious. He
Al priest in point of serv
northwest. having recently
the fiftieth anniversary of
<*nts were made for hold
hop's funeral at Boise at
xt Wednesday. The body
nsported there in the St
1 car leaving here Monday.
0T HIS MEDAL FOR
JUST A BIT O' NOTHIN'
hat Sergeant Maguire
Canadians Says, But
Explain He is a Hero
Sanguinary Battle of
i en, in Fland ers.
Maguire, with MaJ. J. C.
British recruiting mission
tries in his pc ketbook a
about the size of a dollar
■d from a red and blue
the bark of the sliver
the words, "A Warded for
a Service.' 1 Sergeant Ma
arries two scare, the gift
infantrymen.
that Maguire did to win
English service medal is
MOUTH FARMERS
WANT mi WHEAT
DECEIRES MYERS
Government Regulation is
Briefly Discussed in
ßenate.
Washington, Aug. 25.—Govern
ment regulation* of wheat prices
were briefly rfiecusoed today in Ihe
senate. Senator Gronna of North
Dakota declared that the food bill
has had a ruinous effect ton , the
grain production, and, instead of
stimulating, had restricted it.
Senators Brady and Newlands
urged members not to be hasty in
their critcism of the food adminis
tration. Senator Gronna, in reply,
protested against the government
taking over the 1917 wheat crop.
"The farmers of North Dakota
and neighboring states have been
urging that gambling and specula
tion in wheat be stopped and now
that it has been they are not sat
isfied," interrupted Senator Nelson
of Minnesota.
A telegram from farmers in Mon
tana urging that unless the govern
ment fixes a price of $2.50 a bushel
for wheat the result would be ruin
ous for them, was read by Senator
Myers.
ITILY'S TRIPS
IT LIST WIN THE
TOP Of«
Crest of Great Barrier is Sur
mounted After Months
of Effort.
RENEWED OFFENSIVE TO
COME ON WESTERN LINE
French in Champagne and the
British in Flanders Prepare
New Attacks.
THE WAR SUMMARY.
The Austrian line on the Isonzo
front has been broken at several
points by the Italians, it is announced
officially at Rome. The Italians, con
tinuing their furious assaults between
Tolmino and the Adriatic, are now
pursuing the retreating Austrians
who are defending the difficult
ground yard by yard.
One of the most brilliant feats of
the Italians was the capture of Monte
Santo, 2,245 feet high. This peak,
seven miles north of Gorizia, domi
nates the broad plain beyond that
city and occupancy of it has enabled
the Austrians to hold up the Italian
advance to the east since their cap
ture of that city laet year.
Having gained their Joint objec
tives on the Verdun front the French
are completing their victory by local
attucks to round out and secure their
new lines. Profiting by the capture
of Hill 304 yesterday, they advanced,
last night to the north of it.
Renewal of fighting in the Cham
pagne may be forecast in the state
ment of the official French report
that violent artillery engagements are
in progress there. In Belgium also in
the vicinity of Bixschoote the big
guns are heavily engaged.
FRENCH SCORE A NEW
VICTORY AT VERDUN
Paris, Aug. 25.—The French scored
a new victory on the Verdun front last
night north of hill 304. Three enemy
posts near Itethincourt were captured.
The number of prisoners taken has
been increased to 6,101.
TRI COLOR OF ITALY FLIES
ON AN AUSTRIAN PEAK
Rome, Aug. 25.—Tri-color of Italy
has been flying since yesterday on the
(Continued on Page Twelve.)
nothing compared to the job of get
ting the story from him.
"Just a little bit o' nothing," he an
swers when asked what action brought
the medal. "A German shot me and
missed me and they gave .me a medal.
But the real story, taken piecemeal
from Maguire's story of trench life, is
one of that common sort of heroism
that is found so often in the French
and English trenches. Maguire is a
Canadian, hailing from Ottawa in On
tario province. He was in the first
battles of the war when the Germans
had the preponderance of artillery and
when the Canadians had little but their
own undaunted nerve.
At 8t. Julien.
It was at the battle of St. Julien,
called the second battle of the Ypres,
(Continued on r*age Two.)
BUILDING COMMITTEE OF THE Y. M. C. A.
WJHICH WILL OPEN SIDS ON MONDAY
p
/
THESE MEN WILL HAVE CHARGE OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW EDIFICE.
The building committee ot the Y. M. C. A. met this morning nt the offices of the Butte Water company. The Chicago architect of the Y. M. C. A. wns not nresent
and so the meeting adjourned until Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, at which time the contract for the erection of the building will he awarded It is under
ktoflfl Hint m nnmlwp ..f ln.lc I. ...... 1....... . .. 1 .... ; 51 .. .1 Tl... _ i...... r .i ... ■ ..... onuiuvu. n in IlllUt I
stood that a number of bids have been submitted. The members of the committee as shown in the picture are, top
a relut cot ; PPed Melcher, .1, It. Wharton: bottom row, O, C. Co lton, secretary of the Y. M. C. A.; Kugene Carroll, chain
(left to right): Kloyd Hammill, local
and J. K. Oppenheimer.
UNABLE TO PIN
HIM DOWN TO A
CONCRETE PLAN
German Chancellor Evades the
Issue When Parties Con
fer on Peace.
SAYS HE WANTS ELBOW
ROOM TO NEGOTIATE
-
Reichstag Leaders Declare He
Must Seek Peace Under
Their Resolution.
Copenhagen, Aug. 25. Yesterday's
session of the main committee of the
reichstag was productive of further
declarations and discussions regarding
Chancellor Michaelis' attitude on peace,
which the latest German papers con
strue variously. A careful perusal of
the mass of reports and comments on
the committee meetings yesterday i
Wednesday shows that Dr. Michaelis
throughout conferences with party
leaders did not change his attitude re
garding the wording of hie ambiguous
speech of July 19 and the situation, as
far as pinning him down to any defi
nite peace program, remains exactly
where it was when he assumed office.
It was brought out in the report of
yesterday's proceedings that the ma
pority party representatives endeav
ored before the reichstag meeting July
19 to secure from him definite assur
ances, but failed.
Only One Optimist.
Herr Rrzberger, the centrist leader,
alone declared in yesterday's commit
tee sitting that doubt as to the chan
cellor's acceptance of the principle of
peace without annexation or indemni
ties now had been elfrninated for good.
All other views ranged from mild doubt
and open skepticism to flat denial.
Vorwaerts, the socialist organ, is
Inclined to give the chancellor the ben
efit of the doubt, but demands that he
defend his political integrity and good
faith against pan-German machina
tions by a plain and unequivocal state
ment that he does not hold' ideas of
annexation and conquest which these
elements attribute to him.
Crisis Adjourned.
The Berlin Tageblatt says the crisis
is only adjourned. Herr Hausmann,
radical member of the reichstag, de
clared in a speech in the committee
that the chancellor had induced ele
ments of doubt and uncertainty into
the interpretation of the reichstag res
olution; had allowed the conservatives
to claim him as their own man with
out a word of protest, and that he
had done nothing to shake off the as
sertion of pan-Germanism that he is
playing a false game in politics.
The chancelier, on Wednesday, as
on the day when he assumed office,
demanded elbow' room for peace nego
tiations, but jjie majority leaders then,
as now, declared expressly that there
could he no question of such elbow
room and that peace must be made on
the basis specified in the resolution.
Dr. Michaelis was warned of the dan
of procrastinating.
HOOVER TO CONFER
WITH MEAT PACKERS
Chicago, 111., Aug. 25.—Herbert C.
Hoover, United States food adminis
trator, arrived here toduy to confer
with the meat packers and also with
members of his own staff stationed
here.
TROOPS ARE ORDERED TO
SHOOT PERSONS CAUGHT
SETTINGJOREST FIRES
Authorities in Oregon Are Convinced That a Majority of the
Forest Fires in Fifteen Counties of That State Are of Incen
diary Origin. Two Fire Fighters Are Burned to Death in
Clatsop County. Heavy Damage in Three National Forests.
Portland, Aug. 25.—Detachments of Oregon troops began taking
to the forests of the state today, armed and with orders to kill any
persons found in the act of setting forest fires. The order for drastic
I action came from federal and state authorities jointly, because indica
Uon höd t hat a majority of the fires now burning in 15 counties
were of incend,ary ri in
were of incend,ary ° ri s in
The first loss of life in the fires was
reported from Clatsop county. Two
Bulgarians fighting lire near K nappa
were burned to death last night. Their
bodies w'ere not recovered. Coos
county was isolated today. Fires had
destroyed all wires leading to that dis
trict. Repairs were in progress.
At Hood River it was impossible to
see across to the Washington shore of
the Columbia river because of smoke.
Greatest djimage In national forests
was reported from the Minam,
Deschutes and Cascade reserves, the
first two in central Oregon and the
third in western portion of the state.
In all of these reserves large bodies "
green timber were reported burned.
LABOR UNIONS OPPOSE
MOSCOW CONFERENCE
People Fear Counter "Revolu
tion is About to Be
Launched.
Moscow. Aug. 25.—I«abor unions are
opposing the Moscow conference and
have announced a one-day strike in
protest. The leaders of the unions de
clared the conference to be "countc»r
revolutionary'' and that it was not
possible for democratic organizations
to participate. They regard the con
ference as an effort to deceive the
masses. Protest meetings in various
factories and works were called for to
day. ,
Minimalists and social revolution
ists likewise are voicing opposition
and held a meeting at which It was
resolved that the conference was un
representative of the people and an
nouncing In advance that they would
not abide by any decision taken. In
view of the widespread opposition the
big opera house where the conference
will sit will Iao surrounded by troops
throughout the sessions.
17 OF CREW AND THE
CAPTAIN ARE MISSING
Others of the Stranded Jap
Freighter Saved by an
American Ship.
San Francisco, Aug. 25.— 1 Thirty-two
ot the crew ot the Japanese freighter
Kotohira Mara, which went ashore off
the Alaskan coast on July 27. have
been rescued and are almaril the
steamer Santa Ana, now en route to
Seattle, according to a wireless mes
sage received from the vessel today
by the marine department of the
Chamber of Commerce here. Seven
teen of the crew and the captain are
missing. '
f
j
j
I
i
Anaconda Company Properties
1 ■* -
ONLY ENGINEERS
AND. PUMPMEN
AT WORK T0DÄY
Here All Closed—Smelter
Down Tight.
Ah a result of yesterday's suspension
order by officials of the Anaconda
Copper Mining company, the mines of
Butte, with the exception of a few in
dependent properties, are closed to
day. The only men at work in the
mines are some engineers and pump
men, who will remain at their posts, to
keep the* mines from being flooded.
Reports from Anaconda are that the
only men at the Washoe Smelter today
are watchmen employed at the plant.
The smelter In Great Falls is in op
eration today, but will dose within 48
hours. By that time all the ore in
transit will have been treated.
The Independent properties operat
ing today are those of the Butte Su
perior. Elm Orlu, Fast Butte and
Davis-Daly. Their suspension, how
ever, is believed to be merely a ques
tion of time—probably a few days.
Managers of the independent proper
ties anticipate a walkout of the Metal
Trades craftsmen. Even though this
should fail to materialize they believe
that the pressure brought on the
miners at work will he so strong, and
the intimidation so great, that they
will eventually quit work.
R*dgera Here.
W. H. Rodgers, representing the
United ft tu tee department of labor, re
turned to Butte last night under direct
instruction» from Secretary Wilson.
He came here from Ely, Nev., arriv
ing late last night. What Mr. Rodg
ers' instructions are. or how long he
will remain here, he does not state,
any more than that he has been or
dered here to keep the department of
labor at Washington advised about the
local situation. '
When he left, a month ago. Mr.
Rodgers went to Minneapolis, where
he adjusted some labor troubles. The
remainder of the time he lias spent in
Ely. Nev.. in connection with the labor
situation there.
Call it a Lockout.
Members of ths Metal Trades
council union today took the stand that
the shutdown is a lockout. A promi
nent labor leader ridiculed this stand
but declared that it Is being taken for
the purpose of getting strike funds
from the international union and to
lay a defense to the charge to be pre
ferred by International officers that
members of the local union* Violated
(Continued on
Pagdfwo.)
PRESIDENT imlo
(VOID TAKING OF
THE MARRIED MEN
-—- j
rs___. n . _.
\nf rites Secretary Baker That :
it Should Be Avoided
if Possible.
EXECUTIVE'S OPINION
CONFLICTS WITH ARMY
Would Favor Heads of Fam
ilies at Least Upon
First Draft.
Washington. Aug. ' 25. — President
Wilson has written Secretary Baker
expressing a view that the drafting of
married men who ar e heads of fami
lies should be carefully examined into,
and avoided, if possible, and express
ing the view that single men should
be taken where it is possible.
As the president is empowered by
the draft law to make the regulations
under which it will be carried out,
the effect of his letter to Secretary
Baker is to throw his attitude toward
a more liberal policy for exemption of
married meg than heretofore lias been
pursued by the provost marshal gen
eral's office.
It is no secret that the president's
opinion is in open conflict with the
interpretation placed upon the law by
the army officers who are administer
ing it. They contend that as the his
tory of the law show's that congress
voted down amendments to exempt
married men, they have not received
authority to exempt them except on
grounds of dependency alone.
President Wilson's view', as forecast
ip his recent letter to Senator Weeks,
is that the taking «>f married men and
heads of families should be avoided at
least on the first draft.
SOCIALIST OFFICIAL HELD
ON A TBEASON CHARGE
Portland, Aug. 25.—Victor J. Mc
Cone, see rear y of the Oregon socialist
party, is under arrest at Lewiston. Ida.,
on a federal charge of treason, accord
ing to word received here last night.
McCone is accused of having been
active in spreading 1 . W. W. propa
ganda In Idaho and with having tn
cltad m en to oppose the array draft.
FRESH WIND SENDS FOREST
FIRES OFF IN NEW FURY
SeFway Fire Near Lolo is Now
Running Down Montana Side
of the Mountains. The Seeiy
Lake Fire Jumps the Clear
water. More Men Go From
Butte.
A strong wind in the we.Nra p^rt
of Montana yesterday sent a half
docen ot the larger forest fires over
the patrol lines and wrecked for the
time hetng any hopes of the forestry
officials that the fires would be put
Under control this week. Around the
nearly Inaccessible Seely lake, north
EXPLOSION AT
MARE ISLAND
NHCCMWT
Result of Partial Inquiry Into
Disaster is Made
Public.
CONTROVERSY WITH NAVY
LEAGUE FOLLOWE D CRIME
Charge Made That Investiga
tion of Department Was
Being Hampered.
Washington, Aug. 25.—The ex
plosion at Mare Island navy yard
in July, killing five and injuring
more than ,10, is pronounced in an
official report made public today
by Secretary Daniels to have been
the deliberate act of some one un
known and not an accident.
Secretary Daniels today made public
a synopsis of the report made after
the Explosion at Mare Island by the
bureau of ordnance and navigation and
the judge advocate general of the
navy. All those branches of the serv
i< «* agreed that there had 1 >een no
"hampering instructions or restrictive
directions of the method of investiga
tion."
It was the Mare Island explosion in-
vestigation which led to the recent
bitter controversy between Secretary
Daniels and the Navy league which
culminated in Mr. Daniels cutting all
relations between the naval establish-
ment and the league. in a statement
recently, the avowed purpose of which
was to secure publicity for the Inves-
tigation. the league declared that it
had been informed of evidence that a
j time fuse bad been found lea*ding to
the black powder magazine in which
: explosion occurred, showing
rlmlnal conspiracy and that the in
vestigation was being hampered by
powerful labor influences.
Secretary Daniels hotly denounced
the charge that any influence was
holding tip the investigation and cut
off nil connections with the league. As
to the truth of the charge that a fuse
had keen discovered. Mr. Istniels said
""(Continued on I "a. - Tw o.) '
rasoir
TO GDING END
TO SHIP STRIKE
Government Officials and La
bor Men to Be Among
the Arbiters.
Washington, Aug. 25.—Karly and
peaceable adjustment of labor dis
putes in shipyards is expected by the
creation today of an adjustment board
to consist of three, four or five mem
bers, according to the nature of the
problems to be solved.
President Wilson appointed V.
lOverit May of New York chairman of
the board. The second member will
be named by Samuel Gompers, presi
dent of the American Federation of
I*abor, the chief emergency fieet cor
poration naming the third.
In the event that a dispute involves
the navy. Assistant Secretary Roose
velt will sit as a member of the board.
When the trouble concerns a private
shipyard, a representative of local la
bor and local shipping interests w'ill
sit. The secretary of war, as chair
man of the national defense council,
will have the deciding vote in the
case of a tie when Secretary Roose
velt. sitting on the board, raises the
number to four.
By the creation of the board it is be
lieved that the strike in New York
will be settled and that the threatened
strike of more than 100.000 ship yard
men on the Pacific coast w'ill be
averted.
Members of the board feel confident
that they will be able to adjust not
only pending disputes but that they
will he able to prevent serious inter
ruption of work throughout the war.
of Missoula, and about Lo Lo Hot
Springs, Just east of the Idaho bor
der, the two big fires have broken out
with renewed fury. Two hundred men
are lteing sent today from Butte to
these two district via Missoula.
In both of these districts the out*
break of the flames yesterday came
neat' causing loss of life. Fifty fire
fighters in Salmon Lake district, near
Seely lake, were forced to flee for their
lives when the wind sent the fires
across the patrol Hnes. The fire
fighters' camp was destroyed, but all
the men reached safety. This fire
threatens to Jump the Clearwater river
beyond which it would have an Mn
(Continue on Page Seven.)

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