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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, October 12, 1917, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-10-12/ed-1/seq-5/

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C ONSERVATIVE men of forty and over- and
younger men of sedate tastes find in Society
Brand Clothes just the style and tailoring they want.
This store is "Style Headquarters"—the exclusive home of
Society Brand Clothes. They proclaim good taste and care
for detail, yet are never extreme in style, cut or pattern.
Style Headquarters
125 NORTH MAIN ST.
See Our Windows Showing Conservai ivc and Better Models
STYI.i: HKAOQUAKTlîaS— 'THE STORE TUAT SKI.I.S SOCIETY BIVA.VD CLOTHES.
Il7=
ERICAN DISCOVERY OF A NEW
ANESTHETIC HAILED AS MIRACLE
IN FIELD HOSPITALS AT THE FRONT
T. HERBERT DUCKWORTH.
York, Oct. 12.—"He conquered
ill that tablet place Gordon Ed
itante in the hall of fame?
idle thousands upon thousands «*f
nded soldiers are writhing in agony
^urds has appeared on the battle
i an angel of mercy, with a
'pie chemical solution he calls
algin, which he has at last suc
ed in having war hospitals adopt
a means of killing pain. He is now
vork developing the anesthetic
ich medical men expect will eventu
' make him one of the great war
oes. Once a hospital orderly, Ed
rds has had a long uphill light. It is
old story of the snubbed pioneer «>r
entor at last coining into his own.
.dward8. now about 30, a graduate
[Stanford, worked a few years as an
irical engineer. Later, while or
ly in a hospital, he heard doctors
loaning the fact there was no per
anesthetic for dentistry. He de
mined to discover one. He plunged
the study of medicine. After a
: r's research he came across a long
gotten formula foç a solution that
remarkable analgesic properties.
Edwards came to New York, almost
tiniless, to go in for dental
esthesia and get back some of his
Then the war broke out. In
ptember, 1914, while in the Red
oss headquarters, he saw his chance
setve humanity by conquering pain.
ask«*d for a tryout at the hospitals,
t was brusquely turned down every
Initially he interested Miss Anne
organ. With her letter of introduc
visited the Vanderbilt #inlc.
re he was given opportunity to try
Bo.ution on an old womun with
Inful leg ulcers that the physicians
niitted were "a scandal to the pro
eion." Nfkalgln killed the pain,
enty-five other cases were success
i'y treated In the name way.
Encouraged, Edwards sailed for Eu
3 K
FROM
COU.IEI*"
IttL..GaKDOT* EXWAKDS
rope. He ottered Ids anesthesia to the
French and Brltieh governments. Ho
was treated us a paient medicine faker
Even the Ajneriian hospital at Neuilly
turned him down Sympathetic Amer
icans in London and Paris helped with
money. He started a producins labor
atory in England and sent nikalgin free
to the hospitals. A few surgeons tried
it and asked for more.
Finally a famous Japanese hacter
„logist in a Paris hospital wrote that
he had vended the antiseptic proper
ties of nikalgin. it killed the
of streptococci, staphylococci and lock
jaw. But France would noi take it up
' Again Anne %organ came to the
rescue. She Rot Edwards a hearing
with the second army in Verdun.
NlkulKin was used on a poor soldier
whose whole front had been burned
out.with Herman rlnminK lire. I'.xcru
cTatinB Pam prevented dressing the
wounds * The bundnses were saturated
with nikulgin and painlessly removed.
The surgeons regarded this as a mir
ai le.
Now Edwards cannot make nika.gin
fast enough. Thousands of gallon* are
used monthly in Franco, Lives havo
been saved because surgeons have been
enubled to treat wounds otherwise too
painful to be dressed. Edwards and
his supporters foresee a new era—the
painless era!
The man who first gave Edwards a
chance at the Vanderbilt clinic is Dr.
John C. Vaughn, now on the surgical
staff at Bellevue hospital.
"I remember Edwards well," said
Dr. Vaughn today. "llis solution is
not new. It is quinine urea. But too
much credit cannot be given Edwards
for rediscovering this forgotten anes
thetic und applying it for the first
time to open wounds.
"Quinine-urea, or nikalgin, is a re
markable compound. It is both an
anesthetic and an antiseptic. It both
eliminates pain and heals the wound.
"Edwards deserves the thanks of all
suffering humanity, and especially
the wounded soldiers of the allifed
armies."
OVERLOOKED BEST LEG.
Chicago.—Patrick Fehey, who says
he lives at 173 Chestnut street, told the
police that some one had robbed him of
$11 while he was taking his afternoon
siesta in a North Clark street saloon.
Patrick's legs are off above where his
knees should be. The stubs are pro
tected by heavy leather casings.
"To think that any man could be so
low as to rob a cripple! And to take
the money out of there, at that!" said
Fehey to the police, indicating the
leather casing about his right stub.
"But perhaps I've no kick coming after
all," he continued, lifting on high in
turn the left leg. "For I've just $1.000
tucked away in that one. One thousand
dollars! They picked the wrong leg."
The police agreed that the joke was
on the man who got the $11.
DONT RUN DOWN.
-Mum's like a watch, I understand,"
Remarked old Mr. Dirks;
■His hands must he kept busy, and
lie is known by his works."
ITTACK IK WEEK
Haig Takes Quick Advantage
of the Weakening German
Army Morale.
(Continue«! From Page One.)
credit the British high command with
the belief that it is probably of little
use to wait for Rood weather at this
time of the year in Flanders. Another
consideration pointed to is the re
ported weakening state of the German
my morale, an opportunity to be
seized with all possible promptitude if
the utmost advantage is to be taken
f it.
There is no indication that the
'rench forces on the British left which
pushed forward approximately a mile
the
edge
Il«j
tholst
Tuesday's attar
in today's advaiu
»ment seems
pleted by the bri
. point wher
Id be given
the
va I
od in
an* participating
Their task for the
f" efficient protection
the British left tlank
•f the wedge «Iriving
irried out between
id Gheluvelt.
BRITISH FORCES
MAKE BIG GAINS
ON SIX-MILE LINE
British Front in France and Belgium,
ct. 12.— (By the associated press.) —
t an early hour today British troops,
hich began an attack in Flanders
ds morning, had penetrated several
hundred yards into the enemy's terri
tory on a six-mile front, from near
Houtholit wood to a point below the
Y pros- Roulera railway, and were bat
tling along tin* Passchendaele ridge,
within 1,000 yards of the center of the
village of Passchendaele.
By 7:45 o'clock this morning re
ports were received that everything
was going well with the attack. '
troops along a wide front had pushed
forward to a depth averaging 800
mo
ling to
l early, although slowly,
tie condition of tin ground.
The main enemy today v
îermans, hut the mini. T1
»ere far less formidable i
lusdy, owing to the disorgui
thet
nizatb
the
ific blows .if the British,
he corresr«»nd«*nt yesterday spoke
Field Marshal Haig, who does not
fine himself to headquarters. The
field marshal paid the highest tribut«
the ridge and left the Germans with
only a small section in the region of
Passchendaele. The British now hold
most of the good positions on the
ridge, from which they dominate with
their artillery the Important Roulers
Menin railroad and the railroad towns
of Boulera, Staden and Monin.
Apparently the present drive is being
made under weather conditions sim
ilar to those which existed Tuesday.
Following several days of heavy rain.
Field Marshal Haig threw his men
forward and surprised the Germans,
who did not think that the British
Would attempt to attack while the bat
tlefield was waterlogged.
to hii
me
for their
gallant work in
the I*
id w
eat her.
Field Ms
rshal Haig
s late
Ht effort is
being
pushed in the
same
region as
th«» a
tack
of Tuesday
, whe
the Brit
ish, i
1 co
operation
with
he French,
drove
buck the Germ
ms al
jug a front
of sc
ven
m|les and
rapt
ired more
than
2,000
prisoners.
It
s probable
that
he i
resent <*ff«»
rt is
in attempt
tv cl
nr
be Germai
s fro
m t ho ro
maininlr
>ort lobs <»
the
dom inant
ri«lge
east
of Y pres
Tue
sday's at
tack gave
the British^jnore
ground on
HEAVY ARTILLERY
ON FIGHTING LINE
London. Thursday, Oct. 11.—Heavy
urtiller fighting is reported in the of
ficial statement given out here tonight.
Three « Jerman airplanes were de
stroyed and two others were driven
down out of control. The British lost
four machines.
ACTIVE NIGHT ON
THE FRENCH FRONT
Paris. Oct. 12.—The night was
marked oy err out activity of the artil
lory and by a series of German efforts
at various points on front," says to
day's official statement. "West of Cerny
we repulsed an enemy attack while
a detail operation carried out by us
n«»rth of Noisy farm enabled us to
bring back prisoners. An enemy sur
pris«» attack west of Maisons de Cham
pagne and three German efforts in the
region of Auberive and Souain came to
nothing.
"on the right bank of the Meuse
(Verdun front) artillery ßghting con
tinues in the region of Bezonvaux."
BERLIN NOTES NEW
ATTACK OF ALLIES
Beilin. Oct. 12 (via London).— Fresh
attacks were begun on a wide front in
Flanders today by entente forces after
drumfire had been directed on the area
from the Lyi to the 1 Ypres-Menin
road, army headquarters announces.
ANOTHER AIR RAID
ON BELGIAN POSITIONS
London, Oct. 12.—Another air raid
over Belgium was reported officially
today. The statement follows:
"Naval aircraft dropped many bombs
on the Sparappelhoek airdrome yester
day afternoon, despite heavy clouds
and rain. All our machines returned."
PAW KNOWS EVERYTHINO.
Willie—Paw, why does a poem have
to have feel?
Paw So it can run iu your head, my
IT'S A
"RIALTO
SUPERIORITY"
PICTURE!
GEORGE BEBAN
'IN ■' —........- =
'LOST IN TRANSIT'
There's "Nellie," the old Yvhite horse—"Rags" the dog
'—Bobby White, (he kid, and GEORGE BEBAN in a
picture that you will remember always—
''A BEDROOM BLUNDER"
A Paramount-Mack Sennett comedy chock full of
laughs—
"THE FIGHTING TRAIL"
The second episode of this thrilling; picture—
TODAY And Tomorrow Only TODAY
l/TO
A. M. to n p.
ONE ( HIED FREE WITH EACH ADULT ADMISSION SAT. AFTERNOON
MW PARTIES OF CANADA
GO INTO A COALITION
(Continued from Tage One.)
peeled that the union or national ad
ministration of Sir Robert Borden will
be returned to power. A substantial
opposition, however, is expected to be
returned to parliament.
The Personnel.
The new government is as follows:
Liberals—Sir Arthur Sifton i ; < mi< r
of Alberta; T. A. Creear, representing
the western grain growers; J. A. «'al
der, Saskatchewan; Col. S. C. Mew*
burn, N. W. Rowell and Hugh Guthrie
from Ontario; F. Ü. Carvell. New
Brunswick. and probably Premier
George Murray of Nova Scotia.
Conservatives—Sir Robert Borden,
Arthur Meighen. Sir Thomas White,
Dr. John Reid, Sir Edward Kemp. J.
I). Haxen. Sir James Lougheed, Judge
Doherty. P. E. Blond in. Martin Bur
rell and Albert Leoney.
Ten Take Office.
Ten members of the new union gov
ernment were sworn in at 1 o'clock to
day. These portfolios were announced:
Premier and secretary «»f state for
external affairs, Sir Robert Borden
(conservative).
Minister of overseas service, Sir
Edward Kemp (conservative).
Minister of militia, Major General
Mewburn (liberal).
Immigration and colonization, J. A.
('aider (liberal).
iterior, Arthur Meighen (conserva
tive).
Agriculture. T. A. Creear (liberal).
Customs, A. L. Sifton (liberal).
President of the privy counc il, N. W.
Rowell (liberal).
Railways and canals, J. D. Reid (con
rvatlve).
Secretary of state for mines (new),
Martin Burrell (conservative).
As minister of overseas service, Sir
Edv.ard Kemp succeeds Sir George
Perley. who becomes Canadian high
commissioner at London, in which ca
l acity he has been acting temporary.
Frank Cochrane was appointed chair
man of the board of directors of the
Canadian Northern railroad.
Completed Tonight.
Other portfolios remaining -to be
filled were still the subject of confer
ence this afternoon. It was expected
that the final composition of the new
government would be announced to
night. With the entrance of five lib
erals into the cabinet today the liberal
rcpiesentation is thus far brought up
to seven. Col. C. C. Ballontine and
Hugh Guthrie, liberals, were sworn in
as minister of public works and solici
tor-general, respectively, last week.
Indications were that Premier George
Murray of Nova Scotia and F. B. Car
vell of New Brunswick, liberals, would
ugree to join the government before
night.
THE BUTTE DAILY POST
POSTS YOU ON THE NEWS
SOUTH SIDE NOTES
Staple and fancy groceries; prompt
delivery. Taylor Grocery, 1630 Harri
son avenue. Phone 1031.—Adv.
turned from
»he spent a
father, Hugh McMillan,
a serious opérai
ion af the
Mr. McMillan i;
s improv
soon expects t
o be able
i? special music
at both
Grace Method!;
st church
•hoir which wa*
» recently
h about 3't voici
es will be
inder the dii
nf Hugh June
On Monday the members of the Grace
hurcii will give a postcard shower for the
hoys at Camp Lewis who formerly at
tended the church. It is planned to mail
curds to all the men on the Grace honor
oil
that
Little Olga Kennedy, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. R. IS. Kennedy of 2200 Oregon
avenue gave a delightful party the first
of the week f«»r a number of her play
mates, the occasion being her fifth birth
day. The afternoon was spent with
juvenile games and then refreshments
were served, the cake willi the live
candles being in the center of the table.
Those present were lL.,na T.ance, Mil
tired Gruber, Clarence Watling. Gordon
Lindley, Mabel Grady, Kaiherin, Helen
and Raymond Erickson. Winifred, Isabell
and Henry Ladendorf and Florlne and
August Kennedy. Among the older per
Rons present w«*re Mr. and Mrs. Bready,
Mr. and Mrs. Grady and Mr. and JMrs.
Kennedy.
Chester Hankins of Utah avenue, who
was called to Bellingham, Wash., on ac
count of the illness of his mother, has
returned home after an absence of two
weeks.
W. A. Rolfe is visiting friends on the
south side f«»r a few days while in town
from his home at Livingston.
The Stevens and Manley unit of the
Red Cross society met this aftrenoon and
prepared goods for the next shipment to
the front. The work was under the
direction of Mrs. Clara Daly.
The Kpworth league of the Grace
church will hold a birthday social in the
church parlors next Tuesday evening. A
fine musical program'will be rendered
and refreshments will l>e served. Those
attending will be asked to contribute one
Hair On Face
Bargains In
Women's Shoes
v.-t--- *
ilai
m
Women's Shoes
A surplus stock of Utz & Dunn
shoes, picked up at a special
price by Mr. Hubert while on
his buying trip. Patent vamps,
black cloth tops, button style;
as- <gq QI 7
,"p r S.
School Shoes
Shoes for Children
These shoes in misses* and chil
dren's sizes may be* had in all viei
kid or in patent vamps with Lid
tops; button style; heavy oak soles.
Sizes 5 to 8....................$2.00
Sizes 8 Mi to 11 ................$2.23
Sizes 11 H to 2.................$2.5®
Shoes for Boys
Solid calfskin, with heavy oak
soles, button or lace styles, sizes 9
to 13. Price ..................$2.50
Sizes 13 Vi to 6, price......... $3.00
» à
51 W. Park St.
MINERS BANK BUILDING
HER FIRST CRY.
"Darling." said she, "do you love me
as much as ever?"
"Yes, dearie," said he, with his noso
burled in his newspaper.
That ought to have satisfied her,
but she had to ask: 'Why?''
"Oh, I dunno. Habit, I a'poie."
"It •.*: better to give than to receive,"
quoted the Sage.
'Yes," agreed the Fool, "if you an
talking about advice.*'

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