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The Butte daily post. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1913-1961, November 12, 1917, Image 12

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053058/1917-11-12/ed-1/seq-12/

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HOW
MUCH
IS IT
WORTH
TO YOU
To have. that, satisfied,
well-dressed feeling that
you get from clothes
made to your order. We
will make you the classiest
suit produced anywhere,
make it to your order
after your own ideas how
you want your clothes to
look, and guarantee satis
faction in every way. You
can buy " I) U N I) E E
CLOTHES" at only
store in Butte.
one
We H ave An Elegant Line
of Specials at $19 and Up.
UNION TAILORS
62 West f'ark St.
footbsli msunT
of »min mis
Idaho 16. Whitman o.
Washington State Col!
AfCgios 0
1'. S. Marines it. \rm>
Army 2s. Carlisle 0.
Lehigh 0. Pennsylvania
Amherst :f4. Worcester 'I
Colgate lt>. Connecticut
Tufts C. Colby "
Boston ('«»liege 27. Holy
Pittsburg 13. Washing!«»
Williams :
Navy 2M, <
8t. Tho
Arms 0
North w
MacAlestcr Col
s Aggies 7.
!*. Michigan Aggh
ersity 0. Marque!
Drake 0
Nebraska f»2, Missouri o.
Iowa 3-'*. South Dakota 0.
Carlcton 34. Hamline 0.
North Dakota 12. Creighto
Kansas 13. Oklahoma 6
MONTANA VARSITY TURNS
DEFEAT INTO VICTORY
Mil
oula, No
12
hind, the Montana State uniecisit;
eleven on Saturday defeated the Stat
Agricultural college hoys 9 to 7 in on
of tho beat football
nessed here. The
the great work «»f
took the bull ovet
aft
struggles ever v
Ictory was due to
aptain Bentz, who
for a touchdown
»riscoll had carried the ball 42
yards «»n a forward pass.
TEN RANKING PLAYERS
ARE IN THE SERVICE
San Francisco, Nov. 12. — Johnny
Htrachan. California state tennin chi
pion, has f*>lk»we«l Hilly Johnston, former
national champion, and Bill Marcos and
Bill Whelan, two other players of local
prominent e, into the ranks of the .navy.
The sport of the court now has the proud
dlstincton of having every one of the ten
ranking players In the c*»untry in the
service, in one de|iHi*tment «ir another.
Only recently Strachau made a tour
of the east for the benefit of the am
bulance unit which the National Tennis
association is outfitting.
RECORD ACCEPTED.
The Swedish Amateur Athletic associa
tion has officially accepted J«»hn Zander's
new world's re«*«>rd of 3:54:7 f«»r the 1,500
meter run. The old record of 3:5ü:S was
made by the American runner Kiviat
In the preliminaries of the Stockh«»lni
Olympic games in 1912. Zander's splen
did performance is the more remarkable
from the fact that he ran the entire dis
tance alone.
Expert watch repairing. 1. Simon, 21
N. Main street.
NEWS OF THE SPORT WORLD
OHIO STATE WITH ONE HARLEY WAS TOUGH MEDICINE
BUT WITH TWO "BIG TEN" OPPONENTS HAVE TO STEP
r=À
CHICK HARUBY
CHICK
fulll
thing
h the posslhl
elopmcn
th Harley
GALLATIN ELEVEN GRID
CHAMPIONS OF THE STATE
Despite Tie Game With Butte Saturday, Bozeman Has Shown
the Most Consistent Work. Butte the Only Team to Score
on Them. Locals Put Up Great Fight. Little Chance of
Any Montana Team Meeting the Salt Lake Eleven.
SCORES OF BUTTE AND
BOZEMAN FOR SEASON
Butte.
Bozeman.
l>1aj
18, Anaco
61, Billing
6. Butte 6
tie
with Ttutti
aturday and going through the seasot
•ithout a defeat the Bozeman high schou
leven is «^»needed the championship of
ie state. While there are some who
intend that because of Saturday's result
ic title is somewhat clouded yet Coach
Shirey and the followers of the Purple
id White agree that th*» honors right
ong
the
ullat
vork f«»r the
county boys
has b«
the
«»f the high school ele
the only t
the
Huti
in Mont
There is a chance f*w Bozeman to play
he East Sl«ie high of Salt I«ake In the
Mormon town on Thanksgiving day. but
it is not likely, us reports fr«»m Salt I-ike
are that th«* East Hide boys are not very
keen to play. Taking cognizance of this
fact the Bozeman high boys have broken
training.
Coach Shirey is well pleased with the
score Saturday, taking the stand that the
result is a virtual victory for Butte. On
comparative scores Bozeman should have
defeated Butte 40 to 0. but to the credit
the local lads it must be said that with
score 6 to 0 against them, they played
the game of their lives, literally sweeping
the Bozeman Ihjvs «»ff their feet. The
punt which Fisher blocke«! on Bozeman's
5-yard line and then t«»ok over for a
touchdown was such a sensational per
«vast artillery.
FOR THE POST
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
Tacoma Golf club, and ?
the commercial matches are looked f<
Tr
C000 EVENIN6, DONM.D ~
COWEIN-YoODWTJTT
MIND VlMTlNG Poc fOT
ME K MINUTE,Doll®
-vou, demi; rJT
VD «NT
ML YEM5.
-, FoßW
You. I
E
tf/VQ
RAP
WHAT HAVE YOU GOT AGAINST SISTER, FRECKLES?
BY BLO
UELlO, MlSTEfe,
«RKN-6om <
VENNY?
s NOA WMlENTT-m AniFULLY ,
a , 1 »""» 1
YWRTISTER.
IUhNT
Do YOU
Think
of
that;
I
-lLu
YWWVO
SERVES
fclGHT
■ SETS
STItSCHCOMB
onflde
ided
But it *
tie.
> late und
The
I probably wind up the season
in Billings next Saturday,
game schedule«! with Butte
entrai high for Novemhi
»ntract has been signed, this game may
ot be played.
k Coach Shirey refused to discuss tho
Billings game this morning, but accord
ing to ti»e dt>|H\ Butte should win hatuls
down. When it is considered tluit Shirey'
men playe«l a tie game with the team that
walloped Billings 61 to 0. Butte should
have no trouble in winning next Satur
day.
With the exception of Captain Mey
whose knee is giving him considerable
trouble, the Butte boys emerged in good
shape from Saturday's game.
"It's too liad we didn't play against
Great Calls as we did against Bozeman,
declared Shirov today, "if we had w
would have won from the Electric Cit
boys hands down."
HEAVY ARTILLERY TEAM
BATTERS DOWN CENTRALS
tiisgrat
Ana cot
1er Wi
The st
played
ing th.
otball
lot to
Park
The Central high school
ont down to defeat but
e yesterday at Washoe
da, at the hands of the
shington Coast artillery squad.
-re whs 2.1 to 4 The Hutte boys
very plucky game consider
fact they w«*rc outweighed at
least by 25 pounds. There was a
large delegation of th«» soldier boys in
the grand stand and they kept the
game very lively witlf their cheers and
songs, led by C.irporal McClinton.
Cutey Spears, who succeeded Frank
Cavanaugh as coach of the Dartmouth
football squad, lias developed quite a
formidable eleven t«> sp«»rt the green.
SRITSY^OUEN
OHIO STATE TEAM
LIKELY TO REPEAT
Buckeyes Crush Wisconsin.
Meet Undefeated Illinois
Next Saturday.
Chicago, Nov. 12.—Tlie powerful Ohio
State football eleven is within striking
distance of its second western conference
championship. The Buckeyes continued
their unchecked drive Saturday, crushing
Wisconsin, 16 to 3, and will meet the un
de feuted Illinois team at Columbus next
Saturday in a game thaï probably will
decide tho 1917 honors of ihe "big ten."
Michigan, admitted to be a power this
Reason, is not regarded hr a contender
for the champions' ip. as it only has one
conference game on its schedule.
Critics figure Ohio, which won the title
last season for the first time, to repeat.
The Buckeyes rolled up a larger score
against Wisconsin than did Illinois, which
defeated the Badgers, 7 to 0.
Forward passes gave Ohio its victory
over Wisconsin. Wisconsin's only points
were the result of a Acid goal, which
Simpson, the quarterbu k, kicked from
tli«* 40-yard mark.
Michigan's 12 to 0 rout of C*>rnell in
one of the most important intersectional
contests of the season demonstrated that
Coach Yost has developed one of the most
powerful teams that over represented
Michigan. Veteran critics declare that
Michigan has the fastest charging line in
its history.
N«irthwestorn displayed a dash of its
1916 form in taking the Michigan Aggies
into camp. 39 to 6. The players seemed
to be working together for the first time
this season.
Momlngstar gave Notre Dame, con
queror of the Army, the stiffest kind of
a battle that surprised even the follow
ers of the Iowa institution. For the first
two periods Notre Dame was held score
less. but managed to bag a 13 to 0 victory.
Eastern college football teams appar
enith of their gridiron
games, if the results
is a criterion, when
previous play of the
exception,
ontly reached th
form in Saturday's
can be accepted
compared with th
season. Almost «
elevens battled true to the standards
peot«*d. Not in many seasons had there
been a day when top-heavy scores were
8«» prevalent.
Tw«» games stand out «»wing to the
closeness of the struggle. Pennsylvania
I fought Dartmouth to a standstill and won
I« the closing peri.nl <»r play. As usual
Howard Berry was the scoring factor,
I but considered as a whole, the Pennsyl
vania team outplaye«! its «»pponents.
heav-__
1 •, n .
HUBS AND ENGLEW00DS
a
in
a
BATTLE SCORELESS TIE
Battling every minute, the Hub Ad
dition und Englewood football teams
played a scoreless tie on Hebgen field
yesterday afternoon The teams which
were evenly matched played the old style
game through«Mit. Duke Sehroeder was
referee and (ins I!«*i»e of the Coast Artil
lery was umpire.
An effort will be made to arrange a
game between the pick of the two teams
and an vlevan of the «vast artillery.
END OF THE £UI[
Baseball Magnates Will Dis
cuss Plans Looking Toward
Improvements.
era!.
York. Nov. 12—Baseball magnates,
and followers of the game in gen
e almost unanimous In expression
of the opinion that the coming winter
months will witness important change« in
the methods and arrangements governing
the professional end of the national sport
It appears certain that out of the mass
of suggested and proposed changes radi
cal developments will occur relative
to the conduct of the business end
of the game during the duration of the
war at least.
Both major and minor league magnates
will discuss and consider numerous
suggestions looking toward improvement
of conditions existing at the present time
during the coming annual meetings. While
no hasty action will be taken it is con
sidered likely that several innovations
both in combination and conduct of the I
sport will be a«lopted before th«" season
of 1918 is reached. Owing t*> the difference
of opinion on these points among the
various club owners, it is difficult to name
the proposals which may eventually be
enacted In baseball law* but there has
been no dearth of these both from official
and unofficial sources.
Among the plans advanced are the fol
lowing: Shorter season and schedule in
the major leagues, coupled with a sugges
ti«>n to start the world series several
weeks earlier than has been tho case in
recent years; curtailment of the number
of players now permitted to each club and
a reduction of the present salaries; the
shifting of one or more club franchises
to new and more profitable fields t.f
patronage; the elimination of long and
expensive southern training trips; rear
rangement of schedules with the Idea of
reducing the largo annual transportation
bills; readjustment or combination «»f
minor league circuits in order to provide
moe attractive and lucrative play.
It is exceedingly doubtful if all of these
suggestions are adopted, but it*is equally
certain that some will find their way into
tho codes or agreements of the league
since those in charge realize that base
ball, like all other sports, Is confronted
by conditions which are far from normal.
An example of these conditions can be
cited in the draft problem which «'onfronts
the magnates. A number of major and
minor league players will probably be
lost to the game In this manner be
fore the spring practice begins and their
places must be filled. It is expected that
the big league clubs will draw upon the
minors for war time substitutes. If thiN
is done both the quality and quantity of
play may decrease on certain circuits.
Viewed from any angle the position of the
Itaseball magnate cannot be compared to
the proverbial bed of roses at this time.
SPORTGOSSIP
The first skating in Butte this season
occurred yesterday morning when four
regular skating "bugs" hied away to the
lake and spent the morning on the ice.
Last y«a.r the first day on which skating
was enjoyed on any of the rlnkw was
November 12, Just a year ago today.
Only a select few knew that the ice
was thick enough on the lake to permit
the sport. The day was warm, an ideal
fall «lay, and the skaters dofTed their
coats and hats and gilded gaily about in
their shirt sleeves. One of the men lacked
the nerve to carry his skates in his hands
while passing along the main streets up
town, fearing that on account of the ex
tremely warm weather for this time some
would think that he had gone plum l«x*«>,
so he hid them away in a small grip and
br«»ught them from their concealment
only after arriving at the lake and being
assured that he had not been "Jobbed"
about the ice. At any rate the four had
a gay ol«I time "finding themselves* on
their steels. There were many "spills"
but no casualties f»»r the ice was about
six inches thick. The figure skaters are
planning several parties on the open ice
until the weather becomes cold en«>ugh
to permit of the regular rinks being put
into shape for the winter's sport.
A number «»f Butte and Deer I>»dge
fans attended the athl«*tic show at Ana
cornla Saturday night. Warden Frank
Conley and Col. Tom McTague. both «»f
Deer Ltdge, were intcrortted spectators at
the ring si«le when the boxing bouts were
pulled off and cheered the work of the
soldiers with the gloves. The show was
a corking good exhibition.
Benny Leonard, lightweight champion,
recently declared that he considered
Johnny Dundee his most «langerous rival.
Leonard claims Dundee is the fastest, the
most aggressive and the hardest man to
hit among the whole bunch of lighties.
Howard Berry, the great all-round ath
lete of the University «>f Pennsylvania, is
showing the same fine work on the grid
displayed in
Bill Brennan, the Chicago heavyweight,
showed true championship form in his
recent bout with Bat Levlnsky in Boston,
now credited with tw
I^evinsky, the Chicagi
«attier in a previous
Brennan is
tories
having defeate
bout.
According to a New York story Man
ager McGraw of the Giants has soured «>n
md contemplates cast
irift. WhenOavey's
aeries—batting .526
-----
fie
star
Davey Robert!
ing the outflelde
work in the world'
and fielding 1,000—is taken
sidération, it doesn't seem likely that he
Is doomeil for the ax.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE POST
Famous
Advances Pri
San Felice Cigar Now
The high sta
Felice cigar w
the past year
raw materials
great that it i:
11 bt
ell
Fell«
■«i of quulity «>f the San
lintained. During
ttie increases in taxation,
and wages have been so
impossible to continue to
cigars at the old price.
I
Is Thousands of Hutte I
During tho Past 15 Ye»*
Received
Dental Sdtisfactii
A* Gutrnr.tr«« b,
DR. DA
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teeth ......................
STAR AT ALABAMA MAY
A SECOND ELMER OLIPHA
West Point is usually able to take
pretty good care of its football, which
scarcely ever languishes for want of well
trained, experienced men, to take the
places of those who graduate.
There are two reasons for this. The
army team is not bound by the same
eligibility rules which govern «»ther big
(schools, froshmen. or plobes as they are
culled at the army school, may play, and
a man who has played three years at an
other school may come In and play four
years at the Point.
Although the navy is governed by the
same regulations the army has the a.I
vantage as the age limit f«»r entering
West Point is 21, while at Annapolis it
is IS.
One of the best cases in point at West
Point is Elmer Oliphant, who played fo«»t
hall three years at Purdue an«1 was the
choice of many as AH-Western halfback.
« Hlphai is playing ins third year at
"Bull tit
CHANGE IN COAST LEAGDl
CIRCUIT MAY PROVE RISK
Oakland, Nov. 12.
fans are alrea«ly wan
have their little say
in the Coast league,
been gi
Northwest baseball
rting up prepared to
about any changes
Seattle fans have
umlerstaml that they have
a good chance at Coast league ball an«l
they do not like this talk of Portland
dropping out of the Coast league and go
ing into a Northwestern leagu«* along
with Seattle and three or four other
cities.
And Portland fans .ore complaining be
cause they do not exactly see how tlie
McCredies or anybody else figure that a
city brought up on Coast league ball is
going to be content to drop to North
western ball.
Still another trouble seems to be in the
prospect «if there not being enough clubs
to fill out a Northwestern league. That
looks like the finst indication that the
Northwestern league will not reopen next
year and that the Coast league will keep
its present makeup and add Seattle and
Sacramento to make an ejglit club league.
Here's the way a Seattle scribe f«»re
tells the death of baseball in the north
"2*J f " n attem P* >« "ia<le to revive the
old Northwestern league:
"Adding Portland will make it possible
for the Northwestern league to apply for
and secure class A classification. A six-
club league composed of Portland, Se-
, ''Btle. Spokane, Tacoma, Vancouver and
* club will give a combined impula
of «lightly m«>r«* than 1,000.000.
The Southern league has a combined
population of 1.200.000. while the Western
league has a population of only 834.339.
present constituted. Both are
class A
"While ideal from the magnates stand
point, the change is not what the fans
had Imped for.
"Seattle is larger than any city with
B baseball except New Or
the commercial
It is necessary that
of San Felice cigars
friends who smoki
because of its high quality
jur patronage.
The Deisel
d variety
'• ToJ
the San F«*
tinuan
Lima. Ohio.
the Point ami has on«* vear
perhaps the greatest halfback i
country nail he should h*
The army has this yeai
another star who shoul«l Ik*
greatest linemen in the «unir:
finishes.
He is "Bull" Vandergraaf.
three years has played ' u-B
bamn team. Win* last -a
choice for All-Americn tackle
unanimous choice f«»r AII-Souther«L,
ami who capta ii»e<l his -*£
eclat.
Vandergraaf may b< allcl the
luckiest player in food .ill this y
the Army's first game with 1
Tech he wrenched his k /«»t arvl i
of the game for three weeks.
In his first practice Ur the Now
game lie again wrench«*<l the km
will* not he able to play ;.i
But look out for "Bull tit
to
a
is
rivalry between
and Seattle, transfert« «I ;>> the ball
"Seattle, instead of lighting with
commercial rivals and be
good baseball cities, is carrying. st$\
attemlance, at least four weak sisterz
"And while Portland s « nt ranee in'
Northwestern league will strength«
league on paper it remains tob«
whether the fans of Portland will ««
class A baseball.
"The McCredies havt
in the Hose City to
baseball of a type on
to the major leagues,
park when the team
games or at least play
"They refuse to aut-,
sional hall or the class .ich the w
western league display- while it
(showing in the Rose ( it
"The Northwestern
vastly improved in pi;
Portland will prove **i
that league.
"And there are no «»t! - f cities i
northwest but Portland I Seattle
will stand for much imp: « ment
"Improvement means la tter salari
get better ball players.
"Increased salary limits might »
sible in Spokane and Van« - uver w f "
war inroa«l8 over, but Ta- mia, '>
Aberdeen or any of the otln r cities
jurisdiction of the North
proven themselves next
The Montana eitles are t «»«»
educated the
pennant-«^
slightly
They flock u
i-, winninf
n»f strength
sappointna«
.•stern
CAMP LEWIS GOLFEBS
Camp Lewis, American t- lkc
Nov. 12.—The golf enthusiast*
national army are here perfeeti
plans for a big tourney
Tacoma Country club links on
giving day. There are,manv f» ne
in the camp here, it is stated.
The tourney is being arranged
Tacoma Golf club, and ?
matches are looked f<

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