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The Benton weekly record. [volume] (Benton, Mont.) 1880-1885, June 30, 1881, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053148/1881-06-30/ed-1/seq-7/

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i J j"f, l Nyc's i3or'iealoinng.
a''hc cdltor of this paper who has made
the stll. of¢ the Indian character a life
ti ork, l.i mi hil possession a letter writ
t1'y th well-knlOwn lPocahontas to her
i:thr. an( putllishcs it below for the bene
ilf readers. Although we have, as
\,c, .aid, made the subject of the Indian
char' ter a life study, it has, of course,
t'. ait a distalli e. When it was neces
tO'V t take some risk in visiting them
i dr onallh at a time when they were feel
1 little wild and skittish, we have
taken the risk vicariously in order to
know the truth.
WVERIOWCOMOCO,
Sunday, 1607,
]t'ar' Paw: You ask me to come to
C·l Ibfore another moon. I will try to
i, s. lWhen P'owlhatan speaks, his daugh
ter tumbles to the racket.
Y,,t say I am too solid on the pale face
siatitlh. I hope not. lie is a great man.
I ?, that in the future 11imy people must
v.iclt to the white man.
O uilr leople now are preltty plenty, and
thie '1e face seldom, but the day will
'come whien the red man will be scattered
like the loaves of the forest, and the Smith
famuily will run the entire ranch.
Iur medicine man tells me that after a
time the tribe of Powhatan will disappear
froill the tfce of the earth, while the
Siimitll will extend their business all over
tde ciuntry, till you can't throw a club
at :ta riler dog without hitting one of the
smith family.
M3y policy, therefore, is to become solid
with the majority. A Smith may some
,day he chief cook and bottle washer of
tis. coliuntry. We may want to get some
mleaslres through the council. See?
'T'hen I will go in all my wild beauty
:and tell the high muck-a-muck that years
:ago. II('r the iunbrageous shadow of :l
bigi e'.|n, I plead with my hard-hearted
raelent to prevent him from mashing the
eotau:lnlt of the original Smith, and every
thling; will be 0. K.
You probably catch my meaning.
.\. to loving the gander-shanked pale
face, I hope you will give yourself no
unniecessary loss of sleep over that. He
is, s Ihomely anyhow as a cow-shed struck
with a tclub, and has two wives in Eu
rope ant! three pairs of twins.
,Fear not, noble dad. Your little Poca
hontas has the necessary intellect to pad
&We .etr own canoe, and don't yon ever
tforget it.
Irllhember me to Brindle Dog, and his
sqtuaw, the Sore-Eyed Sage Hen, and send
iie two plugs of tobacco and a new dol
man with beads down the back. At pres
ait I :mt ashamed to colie home, as nmy
wvardtrobe consists of a pair of clam shell
bracelets antd a old parasol. Ta, Ta,
I'OCA.HONTAS.
: Pleasant Episode.
Apropos of Prince Bismarck's birthday
anniversary a pleasant reminiscence of his
vontthtiul days may not be out of place.
Forty-six yealrs ago a young Swedish no
blceman was studying at the Berlin Uni
': rsity. One day he received a letter fr'om
in uncle in Sweden informing hint that
his cousin, a daughter of the relative in
ijquestion, was about to pass through Ber
lin on her way to Ems, and requested that
he would take charge of her during her
sojourn and finally see her safely started
'A, her fuirtherjourney. The young l.dy
ived and was w a'~~ at her hotel
b),y a stalwart young stutdent hoannoune
ed himself as her cousin and escorted her
lduring the three following days, to muse
urns, p)icture galleries and so forth, with
indefatigable courtesy. On the fourth day
he attended her to the Post-Amt, where
she was to depart for Ems, and as she was
warmly thanking him for all the atten
tions he had shown her, requested her per
mis sion, before taking his leave, to make a
confession of his sins. "I must no longer,
nmy dear cousin," lie continued, "conceal
frani you that I am not your cousin at all.
A friend of mine, however, has that honor;
he is undergoing his examinations at col
lege and confided to me the agreeable duty
of carrying out your papa's wishes. My
name is Von Bismarck." This very lady
visited Berlin last year and reminded the
Chancellor of the above incident, reiterat
ing the expression of her gratitude for his
chivalrous politenessof nearly half a cen
tury ago. Interrupting her with a genial
smile, Plrince Bismarck observed: "Par
don me, madam; it is I who am under ob
ligations to you in that matter. Thanks
to you, I was at that time enabled to visit
the museum. I have never since had time
o do so again!"
How to Hang Thermometers.
There seems to be so many erroneous
notions among the many amateur meteor
ologists about the minimum temperature
of the twenty-four hours, and how to ob
tain it correctly, says a correspondent of
the St. Paul Pioneer Press, that a few
lines from an old "weathercock," I trust
will not be altogether lost. In the first
pllace, then, the temperature of the wall of
any building at any hour of the night or
day is not the true temperature of the cir
culating air, and is of no use to science.
A wood wall will radiate its heat more
rapidly than a brick or stone, and
the amateur scientist who hangs his
thermometer on a wood wall can
force his mercury down below the ama
teur who selects a brick wall. The prop
er way to expose your thermometer is to
surround it with a light wood frame, cov
ered with slats, like shutter work, and
roofed over. This will protect it from the
rays of the sun's reflected heat. Run a
light wood bar across the centre of your
shelter, to which you can attach the ther
mometer, which should be when properly
exposed, on the north side of the building,
:rand at least onefoot from all surrounding
objects. If tliese directions are followed,
erroneous reports of extreme hot or eold
weather will not find their way into print
so often. It is not a very fum.ny thing for
the press to report 25 degrees below zero,
when 15 degrees represented the true tem
perature of the circulating air. It gives
persons abroad wrong impressions of your
climate.
A German critic, discussing the ten
dency of his countrymen to exhaust any
subject that they study or write about,
and at the same time to exhaust them
selves and their hearers, give some amus
ing illustrations of the way the theologi
ans of the fatherland have labored upon
the Bible. Thus a Prof. HIaselbach of the
University of Vienna icttired twenty-two
years upon the first chapter of Isaiah, anhd
hadl not finished W'hen death surprised
and carried him oft. Chancellor .Ulrich
Penziger of Tubingen gave 312 university
lectures, covering a lperiod of four yeai~,
upon the prophet Daniel, then lecture
twenty-five years on Isaiah, giving 1,509
lectures,, and then taking up Jeremiabh
ffiullied on lfK
and 4~59 ctu.re.
8th vyer, death
C. A. Broataler & Co.,
s FORT ASSlNABOIN, : : : IONTAA, "
Post Traders,
F REIGHTERS,
INDIAN TRADERS, MAIL CARR(I;.RS AND CONTRACTORS,
--FOR.
ARMY AND INDIAN SUPPLIES!
e
--- :0:
Keep on hand a full line or
General MsrchandieO!
e Including a full line of
b PROVISIONS AND GROCERIES!
` QUEEN SWABRE,
GLASSWARE, FURNITURE, [iA RD W AR, DRY GOOD,S
Liquors, Wagons & .Carts.
Special 1.duceime .ts off:red to prairi - traders, as we ke p on haul a
full line of Indian goods suitable fob the trade
-- :o:
0
e HIGHEST CASH PRICES FOR FURS, ROBES & PELTRIE
T. J. TODD & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
W I NE S!
CIGARS AND TOBACCOS.
--o--
SOLD CROW, HERMITAGE, HUME, MELLWOOD RYE, CABINET, and
i "0. K. MONOGRAM" WHISKIES Constantly on hand.
Imported and Domestic Brandies and Wines, St. Louis and
Milwaukee Beers,
e Cor. Front and Baker Streets, - - - Fort Benton, Montana.
Geneva Nurseries
GENEVA, N. V.,
W. & T. SMITH, Prop's.,
ESTABLISHED 1846.
--r--0
~ive Hundred Acres in Cultivation
-OF- N
FRUIT, ORNAMENTAL TREES,
OSES, SHRUBS, &C.
J. A. GOODHUE, Gen'l Agent, a
Helena. Montana.
RIN(WALD BROS.
& C0.,
BROKERS,
HELENA, MONTANA.
General Broker Business Transacted
In All Its Branches.
We lean money on all kinds of collateral aidn a
good securities.
We keep in stock all the latest designs of Jewel
ry Gems, Guns, Rifles, Pistols, Field Glassesetc.
Our facilities forhandling the very finest quality
of goods at the lowest States prices are unsurpass
ed, as we are connected with two of the largest
brokerage houses in the East, which enables us to
offer to the people of Montana any goods in our
line at the lowest States prices. Our motto is:
Quick Sales & Small Profits.
WeC strive to-please. All goods warrante as[
represented, or, in any case not found so, monieyy
will be refunded cheerfully. Parties wanting anny
kind of goods, no matter whatever it may be, ad
dress us and we will be pleased o give iny in ~
formation desired.
SPECIAL.
We would call the attention of stock men and all ,
who are in want of Field Glasses to the:fact that
wemake a specialty of the largest and most poaw
erfiulglasses made in the world. :Glasses worth
$75 we sell for $40; one worth $65, for' $65;one
worth $50, for $25; one worthi$..; for t.o5:one .worth
$20, for $10. Parties entrusting us with their or
ders by mail can rely upon getting the finest qual- '
ity of goods at the honest Sta tes prices. All orders
will receive our prompt attention.
ADDRESS 1
RINCWALD BROS. & CO,...
Brokers,
HELENA, MONTANA. r
AUERBAOH FINj
VAN SLYgK,;
WHOLESALE
i SOLE AGENTS
NORTH STAR WOOLEN %HILLS,
.. V.V I III.7G1 UIV·, lrr ·
- - - L- J.7J k-VkL~JI
Sun River
Sale, Feed and Livery
n
NATHAN BELL, Proprietor,
One of the Best Managed Stables in Montana,
Good Feed and Careful Attention.
. "Guaranteed. :
IHORSES BOARDED BY THE DAY, WEEK
OR MONTH.
Teams and Saddle Horses
. Furnished to travelers at
REASONABLE RATES.
di apr2lwtf
i t I sst
r the best breeders of Thoroughbred
Sheep in the United States.
The Merinos were -
Of Vermont, and arc especially adapted to the cl
Smatt of Montana, because of their comparative
Our ranch is svean1 irole Fort .o.°n, where
we shall bee pleased to se all parties iterested in
Sthoroughbred sheep.
PRICES EA$ONABLE.
Seep ionnte uited. States. -
Theort BetO Merino, ere
_ !red b ; lo. v6:e6. sa tl
f VTeam For' t oure stspcala e to the Falls.i
A.J.VNC
TWNT-EGHaMLESPINS
.5,. -~:
Teoiný oc o ris s tothe Fall . r·wt
JUST RECEIVED AT
A FULL ND LJARO- LINE OF ON 1, BOYS', aln GHILBRBNIS
)RS
S. N BA GA NS
>-) 0_
i
Call aFurnishing Goode
FRONT BooTREEs Shoes, HaBENTONs, ONTANps
1,E Rubber and GainBoot%,
- ___ AND OILED OLOTHI G, TUMS, VALISES, kc
Wil Run the Fasteich ill e olst Boatsat a smathell ssuri ceriver duri
-- -=_ -0-_
the Coming Seas bought o! ' (oods very low thi na1n
iieg, thcerefoe, prcpaired to give our Clustonmei
G -001) I AIRGAIN S.
-0--o---
Steamer UTTECall Yankton, SSaturday, April 9 Steamer BLAe oILLS" lGood, and b Coi,
S Wa e will give Extra Iedgmenrtl to t p assengers and shippers can rely on close conaecr t illons. For fre li filled witae apply to
HIT. C. POWER & BRO., Fort Benton, . T. T.C. POWER & CO., Hele
FRONT STREET, FORT BET. P. . , MOTASt. Paul.
881JOHH. 18
r Mark all goods "Benton [P] Line' care NP.P. R. ., St. Paul. -
reS Through hills of ladinr oiv i 0 fronm Eastern cities to tall points in Montah an L I.rlitisuh Nm 'thwest Territory.
1881 BAX 8 LAN E 1881
Ii
of
will ply between Fort Be~nton and Bismarck during the coming s .aso Ih .Stame Col. Macleod ill leave
Bismiarek at the opening of navigation and ply between Fort Benton and Bismarck during the season. Thei
Company will run four of the est steamers on the U per isso.ri
For Freight or Passag pply to
I. G. BAKER, & UO., Fort Bentonu,1 T. S.C,. ASH Y elena T
I. G. BAKER & Co., 219 OliveStre t, St Lo ui .
11s. B RO1YhB EB ii\TG RO&1 THE FRINCtPOAL 0 E 0 TH$E E B P CAN DA!
here :;:. :..+; .I-.;-i/r.;++ /+ ++ +++ ;+.+.+++=..++.+.. 7++ + ..
a.;/-+++i+,-i+++.++:;'';.;+++++++.+;+ ·12"++/+ +++.+.:~om ad":.~te~:~ C1' 25t . da -:: .....; 180 an .."'d:+ .... +
+++ +;:.+ ,,:+ +<:++i+++++:' ' ......... " = ....:+: +++i++++ +. + ++. ++:+/+++++:+, -++ :..,,,:.- :,:, + ..... +,+++:+ . , ,.+ .
S500u ALWAtl
FORl 'TFUII
ARREST and CONVICTION
OF
.L ]leward of VI VE I1L'N l ED) I) ..
L..ARS will hi pnait by ti'he 1l ctr,1 inm ,
eat 10 owner. fofr thl ' ull elle.nsion of :11v
peLISo in 1r)· ' os)l s 1 4'u11 lit iliil lte ; 't of,
Setting Fire
RXIIIIE "I { E Sr (
on :iy r-1ng,,' -mlth of the, Missuri Rivcr.
Signed) .10 Il Ei;.LEY.
.1M()CI -)W & S()INS.
IKI I N ;S-l It' Y.
R 1 ,-- )o rth :jidle ri lfi :, " t .M i i t in ..
I[or-,es t| nuleS bi':hUEd u llI i - :I -l.
d s, GREENLEAF & CO.
tRange-Ilighwood to Arrow Creek.
S Address-Benton, M. T.
Ear-marks--Crop off left ear, and two bits on
of rig lt ear.
-- -- -
t 'C, & C
above
41J01121( 7v ' i: p,
lVilDeA(l. I) VBIS, HI-A.UgSER & CO.
Address- Parker, Meagher Co., 3. T
I:ar-i arks-l nderbit out of th ears.
Rani e --From r an 'k lutt' Ito FIat Willow Creek,
fronm Judith MIountains to the Little Snow'ies, (i"
John IL Evans & Yleft iIevereaux.
r, -.--] uf
)\< )o Fr , 'l M l('D ol- , rek, T.s
( ,lo is :.t Trn doe m l e. on eft s houllerr .mi aI hio r s.
N _ le t- brand -h n .
MONTANA 4 "TLf .
Lurine CatAs- TttOnOt'C',i' ' ,'i v-er.
Address-Suin River, M. T.
Range--Sunf RIiver country.
Ear-inarks--Creseent or slit in right ear.
Yent--'rpendicular ber across brand.
2d.
pril 16.
M ONTANA CATTLE O
(Incorporated.-)
CIIAS. TIIOROUGIIHMAN, Manager.
Address- -un i-ver.
Range--Sun River counltry.
Xlso owners of I-H and brands.
--r Ti t,-, V.lry adl Mraria.
i * - :'| A:.';. , 5f '1"
. . . ,;:, r l,; i right ear, undcrbit
80, ande
t . . . . . . . . 4_ : . . . . . . . . . . .
OR D & DU N.N
RaMlge-Sun River and Teton Valleys.
Ear-marls-Crop off left ear, split in right ear.
Horses lranded same as cattle on left shoulder.
" Cattle VentI-Same birand behind left shoulder.
Also owners of about 200 lead, of 70 brlan osC.
leb bip:

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