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The Benton weekly record. (Benton, Mont.) 1880-1885, August 03, 1882, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053148/1882-08-03/ed-1/seq-6/

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DILLY'S DISCOVERY.
Dilly was perched on a fence post, her
light hair flying about her face, as usual,
and her little red hands clasped behind her
back. The three or four small toes that
peeped out through her ragged shoes were
red also, for the autumn day was cold ; but I
Dilly was used to such trilles. Toddles,
the baby, who could not climb the fence,
contented himself with looking through.
He was bundled up-in an odd fashion of'
Dilly's own invention--in an old shawl;
and if the round face that peered between
the fence rails was roughened by the chill
wind, he, like Dilly, had grown accustorm
ed to such discomforts.
It occurred to Freddy Burr, in the next
yard, however, that their situation was
scarcely agreeable. He looked up from
the stick he was trying to split with his
new hatchet, and asked: "What makes
you sit up there such a day as this? Why
don't you go into the house and keep
warm ?"
"Well, I wouldn't think it was any fun
out here, I can tell you, if I didn't have a
warm coat and scarf and these thick boots,"
remarked Freddie, displaying the pair of
red tops that were his pride.
Dilly looked at them, and an old, vague
wonder awoke as she did so, and grew
more and more distinct, until, presently, it
took shape in words:
"Why don't I have such things, too,
Freddie Burr-shoes and new clothes and
something to wear on my head ?"
"'Cause your father drinks 'em up,"
answered Freddie promptly, and without
the slightest hesitation in disclosing the
truth.
Dillie pondered a moment and as prompt
ly denied.
"No he don't either. Folks can't drink
such things. Where do you get yours ?"
"My father buys 'em for me; and the
reason yours don't get any for you is 'cause
they all go into old Barney's rum barrels,
down at the corner. That's the way of it,
true as you live, Dillie Keene, and it's aw
ful mean, too," declared Freddie, grow
ing indignant as he explained.
Then a voice from the pretty house be
yond called Freddy, and he ran in, while
Dilly and Toddles, with their amusement
of watching ended, turned slowly away.
Dilly surveyed herself and the baby
thoughtfully, and sat down upon an old
log to meditate. 3
If what Freddy Burr had told her was t
true, something ought to be done about it.
And the longer she pondered the more
fully she became convinced that she had
heard the truth.
"'Cause other folkv has things and we j
don't, and it must be ours go somewhere
else." she reasoned. "They can't be anyi
good there either. I'm just sure they can't.
Mebby I've got a hood-mebby. it would
be nice red one, pretty and warm. Wish o
I had it now. Wish Toddles had-"
She stopped, as a brilliant plan flashed
suddenly through her brain. Wouldn't her I
mother be surprised if she could do that
poor mother, who was out washing, and f
who would be so tired when she came home i'
at night. t
"Toddles, let's do it " she said, spring
ing up, excitedly. "Let's go and see if we
can't gets ame of 'em' ."f
'Yah 1" answered Toddles, contentedly, 11
and taking his hand Dilly opened the n
creaking gate and led the way down the
street.
There was a number of men in 'the store
at the corner-a queer store with a curtain
across the lower half of the front window.
Dilly saw them when the door opened, but
she was a determined little body when
once she had decided upon the proper
thing to do. She only clasped Toddles'
hand closer, and walked in and up to the
counter, making an extra effort to speak
plainly, because her heart beat so fast.
"Please, sir, have you got anything of
ours a-soak here?"
There was an instant's silence, and then
a shout of laughter from the men.
"Well, now, that's a neat way of putting
it. Hey, Keene, these youngsters of yours
wants to knock if Barney has you in soak
here."
An old slouch iht behind the stove was
raised a little, but there was no other sign
that the man heard. Dilly shrank back
abashed.
"Oh! I didn't mean him."
"What did you 'mean then?" asked a
coarse, red faced man, advancing from be
hind the bar and speaking in tones not at
all gentle and amiable,
"Shoes and coats and such things,"' fal
tered Dilly. "Hoods--'m afraid it's spoil
ed with the whisky; but mebby ma could
wash it out. Wouldn't you take some of
'em out of your barrel, Mr. Barney ? We
need 'em awful bad."
"I should think as much," muttered one
of the bystanders, surveying the two dilap
idated figures; but Mr. Barney's wrath
was rising.
"What barrel? Who sent you here,"
he demanded angrily.
"Your. rum barrel," answered Dilly,
standing her ground desperately, thoughi
with a little catch in her breath, that was'
just ready to break into a sob., "Ma works i
all the time, and she inokAso sorry; and
we don't have any nice dinners at our
house, like Freddy Burr's; and no new
shoes, nor caps, nor anything. I asked
Freddy where our good things went to,
'cause they don't come to our house, and I
be said you had 'em down here in your
barrels. Please do take some of 'em out,
Mr. Barney. I'm sure it can't make any
body's drink taste a bit better to have a
poor little boy's and girl's new shoes and
dresses and evetrything in the barrel."
You are right there, Sissy, it's nigh
about spoiled the taste of mine," said one,
of the group at the counter, putting down
his glass with a queer, perplexed look.
But there was no perplexity in the bar
keeper's look, That was wrathful.
"We've had enough of this.nonsense!
Now, you v6v, you young ragamufins, T
as fast as your :feet Win-carry you, and
never let me catchtyou inside these doors Pi
again,"
He stepped itowardl them, as if to drive
tbem out, buitt Oth an behind the stove
suddenly atrn*e Yo' b u he
"Take care, Barney' You'd better not t
uteuh them. ioui'v knoc ksd me about 4.1
often enoughi, but you'd be let let them
}talone."
There was a fire in the eyes under the
old slouched hat, before which Mr. Barney
drew back.
SBoth children were crying by that time,
but the father took a hand of each.
t Come, Dlly; come, baby;" and with
out a word or look to his companions, he
passed out into the street.
It was a very silent walk.
f Toddles' tears were dried as soon as the
; atranger, whose loud voice had awukened
I his baby terror, vias out of sight.
{ But poor little Dilly's heart was sore
with disappoittment and fear. She had
failed in the scheme that she had thought
t promised so fairly. No hood nor sh s had
sa he seen after all her bravery in venturing
t into that dreadful store; and who could
s tell how angry her fatuher might be.
She stole shy glances up under the old
7 hat, but see only saw a sober, downcast
face, and he said nothing, not even when
they had reached home.
lie hunted up some fuel and made a
better fire; and then he sat down before
it, with his head between his hands, and
i left the children to their own devices.
But two weeks later Dilly completed the
story, confidentially, to Freddy Burr.
"See here I site said, pushing the toes of
a pair of stout new shoes through the.
fence.
"Where did you get 'em ?" asked
Freddy.
"And see here!" continued Dilly, bob
bing up for an instant to show the hood
that covered her yellow hair, and touching
it significantly with her finger.
"Where did you get 'em ?" repeated
Freddy.
"My pa worked and bought 'em, and
brought "em home; and they didn't get
into anybody's barrel," explained Dilly,
with great pride and little regard for
grammar. Then she pressed her face closet
against the fence for a prolonged inter
view.
"You see, the billenium has come to our
house."
"The what?" questioned bewildered
Freddy.
"The billenlum. It's a pretty long
word," said Dilly complacently; "but it
means good times. Anyh)ow that's what
ma calls it, and I guess she knows. It
was just this way, Freddy Burr: When
you told me Mr. Barney had all our nice
things down to his store in a barrel, I just
went right down there and asked hin for
'em--me and Toddles."
"You didn't!" exclaimed horrified
Freddy. •
we iHe Didn't Want to be Behinud the
ere Age, but Was Not G.oi.g to
ny fbe Fooled,
ald A day or two ago a man wearing a look
ish of doubt, and having the air of one carrying
a great mental burden, made up to a citizen
led who was seated under one of the City Hall
Ter porticoes, and softly began:
t-- "I say, Mister, I live out about ten miles
nnd from here, and I never hear anything until
me it's a year old. I want to ask you a ques
tion." "All right, sir."
g- "What is the Oscar Wilde style ?"
we "Well, there's a chap named Oscar
Wilde. He's a cross between a fool and a
ly, lunatic, Hie dresses like a child, and sees
he more beauty in an old brick yard than the
he rest of us can find in a botanical garden.
Anything outrageous, ridiculous or absurd
)re is called tfter him."
lin "Is that it? Well that settles me" !
w. "What is your trouble?"
ut "Well, you see, I have a wife and two
en daughters. About six months. ago I
er caught one of the gals a-kissingwa carpen
ss' ter, and she said it was the Oscar Wilde
he style. Then I ran on to the other with
ak her hand on the hired man's shoulder, and
she said the same thing. I didn't know,
of you know, and I had to let it pass. I didn't
want my gals to be behind the age, you
en see, and so I didn't kick. Then I caught
the old woman feeding caramels to a house
g painter, and that was Oscar Wilde once
res more. It's been going on all over my
ik farm ever since-moonlight walks, kissing
under the apple trees, hugging on the ver
as anda and calling each other darling all over
the door-yard. And now it wasn't Oscar
Wk Wilde's style after all ?"
"Hardly.'
"That settles me some more ! I'm going
home at the rate of six miles an hour! I'll
a bounce in on 'em iu the midst of their hil
e- arity, and if I don't mangle and pulverize
at the whole caboodle I'll come back to be
kicked! Oscar Wilde! why I'll slam 'em
1- and mop 'em to flinders! Oscar Wilde!
Why, I'll--"
i- And he went away on a trot with a glare
d in his eyes and his fists doubled up.-Du
f btuue Herald.
H, c, CRO0WDER,
e TWENTY- EIGHT. MILE-SPRING8,
" ieams For Tourists to the Falls.
h -lawtr
' IAIINIE INsIfANa. .
hi For marine insurance In flrst.
i letass companies Ilssouri river i "
s1 hippers can apply during the
boating Weason of 188n to the
Ashby Insurance agency, repre.
Ssented by Geo. B. Parker at Fort
Benton, M. T., and T..J. Todd at
I Rismarek, Dakota.
I -k- , KendlePorel .L
One dun mare, bra.4eW a ond e 2bowur
the return of these iltnals, or R any iform
taion that wil loead theitElar reovery.
Jw0dLawtO Co -, a
--- - .--·;-·,,..
HOTEL SALOON
: IIi!
(Next door to Laargent Bou.se
SUN RIVE-R COSSINGs M. T.
All the test and maostpopul~ a brandso
e WINES, LIQUOBS ,S'E1 _4R AND
TOBA C.YO
Ceontantly orn tsand.
0.
I We have the beat Best BILLIARD TA.RL. e in
town and our hir. cio
First-Class in all ts Appointments I
t aprlfdwtf
SPHENIX
SALOON
E'IFROINLT STIERJ-_EET,
FOIT BENTON. - ri3. T'.,
SE&RNARD E. TIERNEYf Prop.
MF'Give Barney a call at hie new quar:
ters, next door above the Overland Hotel:
MANN'S RAN( H!
On The
Road" to Barkea!
Within One Day's Drive of
BENTON OR THE MINE !
14 a convenient and delightful stopping place.
The Begt ofAccommuodatnions for
;lan and Beast
At Reason able Prices.
feb8wtf
ADELAIDE STOCK FRill,
Lake Park, N. P. U. UR.
short Haor.z Cattl .
Shropskire Sh3eep!
My herd of high-bred Short Horns now contains
tanme some 70 animals mostlypure Bates Have for
sale a choice lot of young bulls and heifers all by
this imnorted pure Oxford Geneva (24,221.) This
grand breed ng bull took sweepstakes prize as
yearling at the Philadelphia International Exhibi
tion and will servea limited number of approved
cows outside my herd.
Catalogue on application.
Have a few high grade Shropshire lambs for sale
now coming in and am booking orders at $40 per
pair.
,1. E. dTENGLEBRIONNER.
aprldwtf
1New Ferry Boat !
Running Regularly from the foot of Baker St.
ACROSS THE MISSOUR
Prices Reasonable.
LYNCH & FLINT,
Owners and iManagers.
aprlldwaw
It in All Its Appointments the
e LARGENT HOUSE
g SUN RIVER, MONTANA,
,r
er Is .Jlost Complete.
ar
Its table, beds and general accommodations are
equal to those of any hotel in the Territory.
'1 MRS. J. A. PRICE
)W Has assumed the management of the house and
RI will spare no pains to make her house a de
sirable stopping .place for the trav
eling public.
H Horses Cared Fir.
--OF-
decl4dawtft
-Ot h
For Benton, - oMontaa.,
JnSTUS FiY, PPOPRIETOR
My new gallery being now opened, I beg leave
to announce to the Benton public that I am ready
to make any kind of views at Helena prices, and
will guarantee my work second to noneiii the.Ter
ritory. A cloudy day makes no difference to me.
.I will suggest, however, that mother's bring their
babies for sittings between the hours of tent i4
one. My apparatus for taking
Building- Scenery Views
Is MOST CoxPLETE.
LOWER MAIN STREET, 3ENTON, M. T
ýrnv 1&. dt
LO.B . & IIBINIRIDT,
Crainers and Decorators.
Kafiemngi and Paper angi.n
lwork guaranted and done la first-csas order;
at raesoaab crates. OPFile: Upper Main abreet O
door to W. . Todd. Esd
.+++++ -+',++++++ : + + +. +,+: +... :+++ .. . + .++ ' ++ ++ + +/ + .+ y !+:+.i +; / + ++++ +
,m~r~~inl ii·'r.;+;oi~~i m+++++ 'tibP. :.s+.
ii ta;·n+.t +t.t:.+ " e......
J _. ---uNf k -
per C; r ý` ý t " "
fyni~It
Who aai &0 Reai Dejer- tW&l
51 11 .i n- -.
- -I
s t5 s ri
ni rr n
;I - ii:-.2 - k u ý
!i r y1 its ¶9:nr 3i "in
1hB"h eý s t !Nnr v 0f
®d p tI~. i2 Da X rtiill ý
CARD.-Thanking may mran u r ivr%:- rt' t ", z t 'it. ; ot-L ýnt 4~U
mul m48 many nF~w Trwndsf9 tM4 nt-nA C4 ' tmt 2ýii ," n- t'. . , ,z:
jrtn2d& tf ý 1$' 8mla'r d a t
I - ________________ - - -- - -- -- _.____T __ý..-._._ - ----_.....,.__- . - ----_ .,..____ -- .ý..___._-..ý.
H RIGHT 4 Si:Jtw>8;
FF i r f iS F ' t
~ilde'i~ Bib i- -' r- -¾ ~-·rc et~~P ~a
CAPE TA k¼ :jŽ- -
s s u i . ue ,. s w a y , t t " t tt~
JOlN '' ft i ., . r+ Jl IS
JO5F ii ,' h L.7 fRtb IT. L, W 'm J ..IýYrtLY MO85
At in~ rtiuc Is:t& Oar-t pt {h
ap¾ ;itj 'i
-"ji
I -
le JONII J, KENNEDV-, D fARD KiEL.,LY.
per
IFORT BENT N,MOj TANA
KEINNEDY L& E LY, Proprietors.
SBEEF, MUTTON, PO RK, F ISH, GAME
IANI )ICE.
Vegetabies and uli i2 tufi _ 'ýas ,n
L, We will purchase Beef and Stock- Ca.ttle, and ;are prepared to deliver
them on board of Steamiboat.u at Foi..ort ;rto, or at any other point
on the Missouri river, either by the head or gross weight, at LOWEST
re rates.
Sdtj KENEDY & KELLY.
1882 1882
d 82
ENTTON i LNE.
Will Run Four of the Fastest and best Boats
on the Missouri river the Coming
Season!
Leaving Bismrarok and Benton Every Saturday.
---- :o:- .--
T. C. Power, Manager, 1. P. Baker. Cen. Aat,
193 S. Water as., O41T5 Chain. Coaiuerce Buinrtug, ,.Louis.
John 4. Charles. Sup:.,
.. .Sioux I y o, lowa.
-----:3:----
TARIFF RATES NOW READY,
P Rates garanted, taking quantity and quality into consideration, A~
Ip. whether contiaet is made o0 not before shipping, and all goods .,
Sshipped on or before June,15h from Chircao. St. ifois, St. Paul
. · and other points, reaching Bismarke on or before July Ist, will go ".
- through to Fort Benton on the line, or will make good the extra de - .,
lay-and non-delivery, the .Manager clai imi only the privilege of ,
-s: topping the ,mentioned agents-from taking too mub freight, : -
should there be a rush in the latter portion of the season.:
Boats leave regularly ontie arTd passengers and shippers can r.ely.on close con.
aion. sFor :freighor `passage apply to
TC . POWR&BRO., entonj, M. T. C. PO 8 R CO1., le ena, P 8.
O 11 . C.A.1" Sio'x City, Iowa. J_ P. PýAKER, St. Louis, o
TANA G -" - v - TE I- TOs
T . '" i7 KRLS T?: .. . O: .. ... . I.. . G.. B A KE R v CO .
OOS CO PTL D
I0n
. Cooi N AND ORNA MENTAL WORK.
.J. WACKERLIN T. C. POWER & -Rif. I. G. BAKER & CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS AN
OeHorse-sho and Nails,
Tinwr, Stoves, Queensware, Glassware, Tin Roofing ancd oblt
Charter Oak and Acorn
Cnooking and eating Stov es. a e
The Celebrated WESTcmINSTER and GARLAND
TEE BEST AND ONLY SUCCESSFUL BASE BURNERS IN UoE.
Ocur srock of Queensware is the largest and most complete ever brought to okonto rao
and comprises every article required by hotel and families.
Of every spyle and quality.
ENTIRE ATIAT TO OUR PATROS.
NICK Mi ILLEN.
Has purchased at the executor's sale the entire stock of
LJATETIE AND PFIDlDI 3-s
Belonging to the estate of the late H. A. Schultzs The value of these choice, new
goods is between $15,000. and $20,000. These, together with my
already large assorted stock, making altogether the largest and best
assorted stock,
A-Ol3aru TO .Rox s60,o00o TO .0o,000, COixISTING OF
Ladiest,
iidse, BRoyasl
.nfanýýst Youth s,
Childs
Roots N . " e' 4'py rs and Ribber Good
fiver beforediaplayed by any Arm this side of Chicago.
Sig of the BIG BOOT, Main Street, elena, Motana
W G 1l . K (rnt bas a poaiton· In this hoe azd would be leas
s Zits * 1"& :.q~rw- j*-

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