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The Benton weekly record. (Benton, Mont.) 1880-1885, September 15, 1883, Image 6

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AN INDIAN FIGHT.
A Chapter From the Chronicles of
the Yellowstone.
Just after the last expedition left for the
Black Hills, (in 1876.) Hubble and Charley
Cocke started towards the Big Horn coun
try on a quest for beaver. At Pryor creek
they found some wolf and beaver signs,
and concluded to camp and trap for a few
days. 'Twas about 4 in the afternoon
when they unpacked, and soon afterward
Hubble wentup the creek with a few traps
and Cocke went down. When about a mile
from camp Hubble saw in the hills a little
band of buffalo, and being short of meat
he left his traps, and going out killed one,
and dressing it took a small piece, and go
ing on set his traps and returned to camp.
The next morning he looked at his traps
and in returning went by the dressed buf
falo with the intention of cutting off .more
meat to take to camp. When at the car
cass he found that all of the choice meat
had been cut off and taken away. When
leaving the agency he had been told that
the Crows were on Pryor and he natural
lysupposed that the meat had been taken
by those Indians; so he turned back to
camp to save his things, for, friendly or
hostile, it is the Indian creed to steal at
every opportunity.
Just before he arrived at camp he heard
tiring down the creek. This he supposed
to be made by the Crows killing buffalo.
As he came in sight of the bottom in which
they had made camp he saw several
strange horses running with his. He was
assured it was Crows and walked careless
ly along.
Running from the hills to the creek near
eamp was a little coulee. When within
about 20 yards of this 12 Indians raised
from it and fired without touching him.
With a 50-yard run he reached the brush.
They started to follow him in, but their
leader fell at the edge pierced by a bullet
from Hubble's gun. The remainder held
back and Hubble went on until he found a
dense thicket, in which he laid quietly til.
night. 'I he Indians came near him sever
al times during the day, but did not dis
cover him.
The firing he had heard was made by the
Indians that were lighting Charley Cocke,
who had expressed his intention of taking
a long walk down the creek to look for
beaver signs.
Hubble heard a shot occasionally till
about 4 p. m., when the firing ceased. At
dusk he crawled carefully towards camp;
he found several Indians in it, feasting
from the stores, and carefully crept away.
He would liked to have killed one of them
but did not dare to provoke a fight with
them, for he had but five cartridges with
him, he having been very careless in the
morning and gone out with his belt but
half full and the most of these he had fired
at an antelope.
When it became fairly- dark he struck
out to the nearest settlements. The weath
er and the water of Pryor creek, which
came to his armpits, was very cold, and
worst of all he had no matches with which
to light a fire, so he had to walk steadily to
For three days he walked and crossed
creeks and rivers, and during this time
had not a bite to eat, for in a game country
all of the time he had seen but one deer on
the trip, and shooting at that, missed.
About 4 p. m. of the third day he, just as
he came to the Yellowstone, killed a
prairie chicken, and was just'going to sit
down and eat it when he saw two white
men riding out of the brush about a umile
ahead of him. lie fired his last cartridge
but one to attract their attention but the
wind was blowing from them to him and
they not hearing rode on and out of sight.
Taking the chicken he went on, and tak
ing their back trail soon found where they
had been camped. There was a camp fire
still burning, and lying around were sever
al scraps of bread and meat. Hubble put
their thrown away coffee grounds into a
tin can that he found and steeped them
over, and then, in his judgment, ate the
best meal he had ever had in his life. After
a short rest he felt refreshed, started again,
and the next morning arrived at Country
man's, at the mouth of Stillwater. where
his wants were all relieved.
Knowing that his comrade must be dead,
he did not go back, but about two weeks
afterward a party of Crows found Cocke's
body near the camp on Pryor creek, lean
ing against a tree, ahid had apparently
been in the act of putting a cartridge in
his needle gun when hit, for the chamber
was open and there was a ,cartridge grip
ped last in his right hand. The bullet
passed directly through his brain, and
death must have been instaultanious.
Had the Sioux known that they had kill
ed him there would have been great re
joicing among them, for he as well as Hub
ble was both known and feared, and be
fore his cool aim many of their number
had gone to the happy hunting ground. He
never sought a fight with either whites or
reds, but was always ready when one
came. He was cool and deliberate min
speech and motion, and neither friend or
foe or circumstances ever induced him to
go, when afoot, faster than a walk. He
had some odd ways, yet he would do to tie
to, either for peace or war.
Why They Discharged the Cook.
A man at Long Branch recently entered
a restaurant and said: "Have you any
clam chowder?" "We have," replied the
waiter, "Bring me a plate." A plateful
was placed before him, and he set to work
with great gusto. After he had taken
about a dozen spoonfuls he drew a pair of
opera glasses from his pocket and looked
intently at the chowder for some time.
Then be jumped into the air and gouted :
"Eqreka!" "'What's that?" asked the
proprietor. "I've get it!" yelled the di
ner. "Got what?" asked thi restauran
toeur. "A lam'" "Great)ttf' yelled
the prpr lotr; "he's got the clamn!~"r And
bef*ooethe diner c.uld say a wori the pro
prietor piekod p the oam iln alfi
gold of stIe9s hod :ionl ja
f t
r A
A Sioux Bill of Fare.
One of the peculiarities of the latest
United States style of feeding the noble
red man is the fact that he is given Gov
ernment rations, and at the same time ap
propriations are made which are supposed
to maintain him.
Sometimes a wild Indian who don't
know much about groceries and how to
prepare them for food, comes in and draws
his regular soldier rations in this way: For
instance, up in the Sitting Bull country a
while ago an Indian came in from the war
path who had never seen any of the pale
face style of food, and drew his rations.
He made a light meal of unground cof
fee the first day, and as he overate, and the
coffee swelled on him, he had difficulty in
buttoning his pants around the pain that
he had on hand.
He felt very unhappy for a day or two,
but laid it to the fact that he hadn't exer
cised much, and the consequent ennui and
indigestion resulting therefrom.
As soon as he succeeded in getting his
interior department quieted down a little,
he tackled his ration of candles. These he
decided to parboil, in order to avoid trou
ble from indigestion. The dish was not
so much of a glittering success as he had
anticipated, and as he remorsefully picked
the candle wicking out of his teeth with a
tent pin he made some remark that grated
harshly on the wsthetic ears of those who
stood near.
He then tried a meal of yeast powder
with vinegar. He ate the yeast powder and
then took a pint of extremely potent vine
gar to wash it down.
At first there was a feeling of glad sur
prise in his stomach, which rapidly gave
place to un availing remorse.
A can of yeast powder in an Indian's
midst don't seem to be prepared for a
pint of vinegar, and the result of such an
unfortunate circumstance is not gratify
ing
Every little while a look of pain would
come over the features of the noble child
of the forest, and then he would jump
about seventeen feet and try to kick a
cloud out of the sky. Then he would sit
down and think over his past life.
It took about a week for him to get back
to where he dared to get up another meal
for himself. Then he fricassed a couple of
pounds of laundry soap and ate that.
Soap is all right for external purposes or
for treating a pair of soiled socks, but it
does not assimilate with the gastric juice
readily, and those who have tried laundry
soap as a relish do not seem to think that
it will ever arrive at any degree of prom
inence as an article of diet.
That is why this untutored child of na
ture swore. He ihad never received the
benefits of early training in profauity, and
his language, therefore, was disconnected
and rambling; but when we consider that
he was ignorant of our language, and that
every little while he had to stop and hold
on to his digester with both hands and dig
great holes in the earth with his toes, the
remarks didn't seem altogether out of
place or irrelevant.
powder and vinegar is singing its little
song in the innermost recesses of an In
dian, and this has been followed by a treat
ment of laundry soap, the student of hu
man nature can find a wide field for obser
vation in that locality.
The earnest and occupied look, the trou
bled expression of the countenance, fol
lowed by the quick, nervous twitching of
the muscles of the face, and then the
swelling up and the bursting of Ithe sus
pender button,the deep-drawn sigh and the
smothered cuss-word, all betoken the gas
tric agitation going on within.
This is why an Indian prefers a link of
bologna sausage and a two-year-old dog
to the high priced groceries so common to
our modern civllization.-Bill Nye.
Discovery of a Giant Skeleton.
According to a despatch from Shelby
ville, Ind., George Arnold, a farm hand in
the employ of Franklin Boots, who lives
about fifteen miles west of that city, made
a discovery which has excited widespread
interest in the county. The object of this
interest is the skeleton of what once was
a man of gigantic proportions, which was
uncovered in a gravel pit on Mr. Boots'
farm. The skeleton was found in a sitting
posture, facing the east, and about six feet
beneath the surface. Some of the bones
were badly broken by a caving of the
bank, but the skull and some of the lar
ger bones were taken out intact, and from
them may be easily realised the gigantic
stature of the being to whom they once
gave support. A measurement of the
skull from front to rear, the rule passing
through the eye socket to the back of the
head, shows it to have been about sixteen
inches, while the breadth of the inferior
maxillary was eight and one-half inches,
showing that the brain must have weighed
from four and one-half to five pounds.
Careful measurements of the other bones
establish the fact that the man, when alive,
was not less than nine feet in height, and
large in proportion. From the appear
ance of the teeth, which are very large,
and do not show the slightestan of de
cay, although they are worn down almost
to the bones of the jaw, the man could not
have been less than 100 years old when he
died, and, of course he may have been
much older. The bones of the lower jaw
are very- large and thick, showing an ex
tent of muscular development in tht or-.
gan which is far beyond anything of the
present day. How long ago the body of
this giant was interred, where it was un
earthed, or to what tribe or nation he l'
longed when hd trod the earth in all the
majesty of his strength, itis Impossible to
say. but it mits have been ages ago, as all
the indiato show that she . . l whe
the remainst were discovered o
disturbed for many s..
Uire tb T
the 8t-ei~i~t-tisp otslme
I .ilf
SADDLERY.
COW BOYS' HEADQUARTERS!
STOCK SADDLES TO O0DER oughtthi Fine Harness
Sullivan.
From the following trees:
HAND-MADE I
Half-Breed, Solid Fork, Montana
Stock, Vasika, Lehman,
Texas Iron Fork,
Still, Love, Tea s
Ferseike.
TO ORDER !
Chaps made to order from best quality of calf Buggy an's Team Whips,
skin! Quirt's Hackamore Reatas
Spanise Martingales, Half- HORSE CLOLHING,
Breed Bits, Inlaid
Spurs, Canteas, - NOE BAGS, SWEAT PADS!
Belts.
All Work Warranted, and Hand-Made!
SATISFACTION CUARANTEED OR MONEY REFUNDED.
JOE SULLIVAN,
FRONT STREET, - - - - FORT BENTON, M. T.
uld
former ruined her daughter, and the lat
ter, with fatal results, resorted to mal
practice to conceal the crime of his friend.
The young woman died at the residence of
ick De Martine a few days ago, having been a
foster member of the family for some time.
of The girl bequeathed a contingent interest
of $30,000 in an estate of her father to the
daughter of De Martine, and the mother's
it charges are attributed to a desire to set
aside this will.
AUCTION & COMMISSION
the
d Front St., Near Murphy, Maclay d Co.
hat
hat CITY BAKERY Next Door,
old
dig Real Estate, Household Furniture, Stock
the
of Etc., Bought and Sold.
Furniture
a Specialty.
er
.riAuction sales attended to promptly.
S. A. ROBERTSON.
of
;he T. E. COLLINre, L. H. EaBnrHFIrI
us- OH.. E. DUma, A. HZESHFIELD,
the Fort Benton. Helena.
U- BANK
of OF
NORTHERN MONTANA
gn.
We Transaot a General Banking
in Busine8s.
res
ep current accounts with merc:.anm, stookmen
de and others, subject to be drawn against by
ad check without notice.
his
, WE BUY NOTES AND PAY INTEREST
ras ON TIME DEPOSITS
,ts'
Make loans of money secured .y personal en
g dorsement. Webuy and sell exchante on
set the commercial cnttres of the United
Ststes
ies
he We will give Special Attention to
ar- the Business of Northern and
Central Montana,
tie
iCe will make suhob loans to stock men and far.,
bhe er as are suited to their requirements.
ag
he Ls I .u ti butt.,
Cole ~ tln and all other business entrusted to
for rill eoeive prompt and caretdl attention.
es, OLLINS. DUER & CO.
HOTEL SALOON
Billi id l
he (Next door to Lergeat ouse,)
on BUr EtI (BOLBslBet , .. T.
r-- Allthsb~a sa meupopuar brandsof
·fl com aaos
MAil .NN' 8ANG
Boad to re
welwea wasow ndwe
be: i
MONTANA STABLES!
R.eoperied.
Under the personal management of
CHARLES CRAWFORD.
The Best Hay and Feed to be had Always on Hand and
Careful and attentive hostlers in attendance.
-o
CARD.--Thankng my many patrons for past favors while in the business, I will be glad to meet them agal
and as many new friends as may come, and Iwill try to deserve their patronage.
Janl2dkwtf CHARLES CRAWFORD.
MARIAS SAW MILLS,
JOE KIPP, Proprietor !
ALL KINDS OF
Constantly on Hand And Cut to Order.
Dimension Lumber a Specialty.
Will soon be prepared to furnish the Benton market with Spruce shingles. Our work
men are the best in the Territory, having been brought from the States especally
for this mill.
PRICES REASONABLE
UNDERTAKING.
3e-ter Szmit11,
Carpenter
Builder !
---0--
Has shipped from the States and will keep con
stantly on hand a variety of
Burial Cases,
which he is now prepared to furnish at short
notice.
Carpenter Work, Jobbing,
Etc., Ete, Ete.,
fai- Promptly attended to. ,I,
augsdawtf
BELT CREEK
COA .Ao LI
Before Snow Flies!
The underls n iganwhalt esuperior
quality *f hal feet biYaie on Belf
reek, alwtl coiet with tue
resdenteofBai and oln
ity atreasonabl rtdt
rOW lel twe tesentuaot
;rf w ...
LILY i:
First National Bank
OF HE LENA.
ORGANIZED ISe6.
DESICNATED DEPOSITORY
OF THE UNITED STATES
Paid up Capital" $800,000
Surplus & Profits 208,476
ASSOCIATED BANKS:
First National, Fort Benton, M. T.
Missoula National, Missoula, M. T.
First National, Butte, M. T.
Total Capital and Surplus, 5929,825.
S.T. HAUSER............................President
A. J. DAVIS .......................Vice President
E. W. KNIGHT ..........................Cashier
T. H. KLEINSCHMIDT........Assistant Cashier
We transact a general banking business, and
buy at highest rates, gold dust, coln, gold and sil.
ver bulion, and local securities; and sell ex
change and telegraphic transfers. avallablein all
parts of the United States, the Canadaa, Great
Britain, Ireland, and the Oontinent.
Collections made and proceeds remitted prompt
1.
Doa1t of Dfreetaom
s. T. HAUSER, JOHNCURTIN,
A. M. HOLTER, R.S. HAMILTON
JNO. H. MING, C. P. HIG.INS,
E. W. KNIGHT, A. J. DAVIS,
HENRY M. PARCHEN, T. C. POWER,
T. H. KLEINSCHMIDT.
PACIFIC ROTEL,
BENT ON, .4
New Two-..to. )40
, + , , v.
H. J. WACKERLIN. T. C. POW ER & BR(. I. G. BAKER & CO
I. J. WACKERLIN & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Hardware,
BAR IRON AND
WAGON TIMBERS,
Horse-sho and Nails,
Tinware, Stoves, Queensware, Glassware, Tin Roofing and Sheet Iron
Goods of Every Description.
Charter Oak and Acorn
Cooking and Heating Stoves.
The Celebrated WESTMINSTER
Soft Coal Base Burners.
THE BEST AND ONLY SUCCESSFUL BASE BURNER IN USE.
Our stock of Queensware is the largest and most complete ever brought to Montana
and comprises every article required by hotels and families.
PLAIN AND FANCY TOILET, DINNER AND TEA SETS
Of every style and quality.
Genuine Cut Glass Bar Tumblers, Plain and Fascy Goblets
for family and hotel use.
Our Wagon Timbers are of the Best Seasoned Hard Woods,
and consist of all woods used in building a d repairing wagons, carriages and buggies
We have complete stock of
TIN GOODS!
Including Tin Roofing, Gutters and Pipes, and will contract to do all kinds of roofin
repairing, etc. Tin goods ot every desctiption MADE TO ORDER on shor
notice and at reasonable prices. We propose to keep one of the largest
and best supplied establishmentsof the kind in Montana Territory
and will spare no pans or expense to give
ENTIRE SATISFACTON TO OUR PATRONS.
BWAgent for the LAFLIN & RAND POWDER COMPANY.
Bp A SIC., MCULLOH ( C
POST TRADERS,
Fort Assinaboine, M. T.
BRANCH HOUSE, CONNECTION,
C1A.Brodwoter&o., &, 8! TDR
Wholesale & Retail Dealers, O T AD RS,
Wilder's Lanlina, * , * , TiI FORT MAGINNIS, - - -M. T.
CARRY A FULL AND COMPLETE STOCK OF
ali aýJJ a d by TraNdo of thi Torritor.
W. H. BURGESS,
FANCY AND STAPLE
GROCERIES.
CANN ED GOODS A Specialty.
MASONIC BUILDING,
BENTON, : : : : : MONTANA.
7: H McK.nzgh & co.
Post Traders,
And Dealers in
FORT SHAW, - M. T.
We are in receipt of a large and complete stock of goods consisting of
Dry Goods, Notions, Groceries, Drugs, Boots and. Shoes, Cloth.
Ing, Hats and Caps, Hardware, Woodenware,
Crockery, Harness, Wool Socks and
Twine, Tents, Wagon SheetS,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, ETC.
A. A-qT"S FOI?1
WOOD'S IMPROVED MOWERS, HAPGOOD'S SULKY PLOWS,
IMPROVED SULKY RAKES, and STUDEBAKER WAGONS.
.g.We have on hand and to arrive a larger stock than ever before. Ranchmen and
Stockmen are respectfully invited to examine our goods and prices before pur
chasing elsewhere.
Fowr Saaw, M.T., June 1, 1882.
J. H. MoKnight & Co.
HENTrON
MILK DAIRY
...
1ew Ferry Boat!
nn Reguarly from h. tb!aot f BaLs St.
AEBS "MISSOURI
Aý- ·

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