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The Benton weekly record. [volume] (Benton, Mont.) 1880-1885, November 17, 1883, Image 8

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PREMONITIONS OF DANGER. i
Some Novel Experiences of a Veteran 3
Locomotive Engineer. t
"A fortnight or so ago I was on my way I
to the far West, travelling on a fast through
Baltimore & Ohio express. On a bright
Sunday morning I awoke in my berth and 1
realized that the train was standing still. 1
I raised the curtain and peeped out. The
sun was well up in the heavens, and the
train stood in a dense wood, away from
any living creature. jIt did not move for
some time, and I arose, made my toilet
and went outside. The train stood par
tially on a long trestle work er open
bridge, and I could see the smoke rising
from the end of the structure further from
us. I walked out past the locomotive and
on the bridge where I met a number of
gentlemen talking.
"What's the matter ?" I inquired of one. t
" 'Oh, a section of the bridge has burn- I
ed,' replied the gentleman.
" 'Lucky that the engineer saw the fire e
in time to save us,' I remarked, gazing t
down into the water below and shuddering I
at the thought of being piled upin a sleep- I
ing car, in the chasm that yawned for me.
" But the engineer .avs he didn't see i
any fire when lie stopped," exclaimed one.
"No,' said the engineer, who stood hard I
by. 'I saw no fire. I had a presentiment 1
as I approached the bridge. Something
seemed to warn me that it was not safe to
cross the bridge, and it came upon me so 4
strongly that I just stopped the train and 4
got out of the cab, and I hadn't walked 20
steps before I say that the act had
SAVED MANY LIVES,
for the whole train would have gone down
that hole, although it is but the length of
swo rails. The fire didn't show so much
above above the ties, as it was confined
mostly to the timbers below. Right there
in that little shed a watchman sleeps,'
said the engineer, pointing to a diminu
tive dwelling a half-dozen yards away,
'and it was his duty, and it has been for
years, to be out here and to pass over the
bridge just before and after us; but so.ne
how I felt that he was not faithful, that he
might be asleep, and I could see in my
mind, as I approached the bridge, the
whole train going down to death, and
could hear the cries of the dying, so I just
stopped, as I said. The watchman, sure
enough, was asleep. Oh, you needn't
laugh, for this is not the first time pre
sentments have savd lives when my hand
was at the throttle. No, sir, I've been in
just this position before,' said he, blush
ing to the tips of his fingers. as two or
three gentlemen smiled and wi istled a
bit.
"No,' said he, 'I had a foreboding of
danger stronger than this a few years ago.
I was running then on a division ot the
Saudusky. There is a little station on that
road where the passenger trains seldom
stop. It has a siding for lreigtits,'however,
there was nearly always a freight side
tracked as I passed through on the fast
express. That little place is on
A LONG STRETCH OF SPLENDID TRACK,
and for years the engineers had that as a
racing ground, and I tell you some mighty
good has been made there. At the time
I had this presentment the rivalry among
the engineers on that stretch of track was
at its height. It wasa sharp winter might
that I approached the station on the down
trip. It was foggy, and a fierce wind blew.
1 hadn't stopped there for three months,
and as I went into that good track with a
a dash, and approached the village at a
terrible speed,I never thought of stopping.
My locomotive was the fleetest on the
road, and I was congratulating myself, as
the fireman drew his watch, that I was
making the best time on record, and I was
thinking to myself how I would appall the
trainmen side-tracked as I dashed through.
When a quarter of a mile from the station
something wispered to me to stop. I
1 didn't want to stop; and reflecting how
chagrined I would be if I had to stop when
in the heat of a successful race, I tossed
my head, opened the throttle a little more,
and oh, how we flew! Seems to me I never
saw a train come so near flying, and yet
she just lay as close and smoothly on the
track as could be. Quick as thought I was
commanded by an inner being to stop, or
it would make a run to death; and without
effort, my hands reversed the engine and
applied the air. There was no signal, no
whistle nor bell sounded, and the fireman
was astonished to see my
FRANTIC MOVEMENTS.
The train lay still a few feet past the
depot, and as I jumped from my engine I
felt so embarrassed that I almost burned.
I could make no explanation to the con
ductor or the trainmen who came about
me. 1 looked all over the engine. Every
thing was all right. I cast my eyes along
the train. Nothing appeared wrong.
Then I walked down the track in front of
the engine. When I had gone less than a
hundred feet, and beyond the rays of the
headlight, I ran against a box-ear ! It stood
right out in front of the engine, full on the
track. The switch had been left open and
the wind had skewed it out. It wasloaded
with carbon oil. Had I not seen it scores
of persons would have been killed and
burned.
"I am postive that there is such a thing
as being forewarned, continued the old en
gineer. 'That warning which stopped me
up on Sandusky came only a few months
after I saved, by hair's breadth, a whole
train from being wrecked in a culvert. I
was dashing along one rainy might a few
months before that. The country was
open and my train was the fast express. I
had no reason to suspect any trouble, and
didn't; but something told me as I was
approaching a crossing that I should stop;
and that desire to stop the train fastened
on me until I found myself a minute later,
standing besides the engine. It was so
dark I could scarcely see my hand before
me. I found the culvert filled with croas
ties, wedged down so closely they would
have thrown Uts.
FIAT ON OUR BACKS,
and the work was done so well that I
would not have seen them had not Istop
ped and walked right up on them withi a
iaters.. Did I ever see another' ea erq
who was a believer in.u p ~r speen P
1ts otbaem. I know old iii Crane;
ing issurer than eyesight itself. I remem
ber of a.thrilling story that he told many
years ago, and Ihave thought of it every
time I have been sotpped. He was run
ning an express up in northern Ohio sev
eral years ago-it may have been on the
Baltimore& Ohio-and one night he fell
behind time. When he ran into a station
he gotout to oil his engine, and was doing
it in the most mechanical *-ay, totally ab
sorbed in thought, when the conductor
came up and remarked that they were
very much behind and he hoped they
would be able to make up some time be
fore they reached the end of the run. "I
shall do my best," said Jack, "but we
will be delayed by the covered bridge."
1 The conductor asked how the delay would
I be caused, and Jack remarked that he
f didn't know, but there was something
wrong. He contended that there was I
trouble ahead, and the conductor couldn't
laugh it out of him. Jack said, he dashed
along over that road with all the speed his
e engine would give him, and as he neared
that bridge he made up his mind not to
make a fool of himself by stopping, even if
he did meet with an accident. He said
IIIS HEART SANK WITHIN I11IM
e as he came within sight of the bridge, but C
he nerved himself and went within 200
a feet of it though he would go right
t through, believing his impression that
g something was wrong-gotten at the sta
o tion--was but fancy. When within a hun
o dred feet of the bridge, which looked
d dark and threatening, he was seized with a
0 desire to reverse his engine. A terrible
forboding of disaster and death took hold
of him. He could see the train crashing
n through the structure and heard the
ºf screams of agony as the loads of humanity
b were hurled to death below. Like a flash
d of lightening he reversed his engine and
e screamed down brakes. The train ran 300
feet before it stopped-almost through the
1 bridge. Jack got out and walked ahead of
the engine a few steps. There he found
) that which caused him to stop. The rails
e were opened just a few inches on either
side, so that the gap could hardly be de
ie tected, and yet so that the train would have
been derailed and would have gone
e through the bridge into the river. You
td can't make Jack Crane believe there is
st nothing in forbodings and premonitions." 1
PROBATE NOTICE.
Ir the Probate Court of the County of Choteau,
Territory of Montana.
In the matter of the estate of Frank II. Burd, de
ceased:
Samuel C. Burd, Administrator of the estate of
Frank H. Burd, deceased, having this day reader
ed and presented for settlement, and filed in this
court, his account of his administration of the estate
of said deceased, it is ordered, that Saturday, the
10th day of November. 1883, being a day of a term
of this Court, to-wit: of the November term, 1883,
at 11 o'clock a. m., be, and the same is hereby, ap
pointed for the settlement of the said account ac
cording to law. JOHN W. TATTAN,
Probate Judge, Choteau County, M. T.
Dated October 30, 1883.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Archie McCowan, deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, ad
ministrator of the estate of Archie Mctowan, de
ceased, to the creditors of and all persons having
claims against the said deceased, to present them
with the necessary vouchers within four months
after the first publication of this notice to the said
administrator at his office in Fort Benton, Cho
teau county. Montana, the same being the place
of business for the transaction of all business con
nected with the said estate.
MAX WATERMAN, Administrator.
Estate of Archie McCowan, deceased.
Fort Benton, M. T., October 30, 1883.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
In the District Court of the Third Judicial Dis
trict of the Territory of Montana in and
for the County of Choteau.
Max Waterman and Henry G. McIntire copart
ners under the firm name and style of Waterman
& McIntire, Plaintiffs,
vs.
Richard Mee, Defendant.
To be sold at Sheriff's sale on the 13th day of
November, A. D , 1883, at 12 o'clock noon of said
day, at the court house door in the city of Fort
Benton, Ohoteau county, Montana Territory, the
following described property to-wit: Lots 9 and
10 in block 26, as designated and numbered on
the official and recorded plat of the city of Fort
Benton, Choteau county, Montana Territory,
where said property is situated.
JAS. MCDEVITT,
Sheriff.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
The co-partnership heretofore existing between
the undersigned, under the firm name of Walker
& Donovon, Fort Hawley, Montana, has been
dissolved by mutual consent, aad the business is
discontinued. Either M. P. Walker or P. H.
Donovan will receive all bills and assume all li
abilities of the late firm.
M. P. WALKER.
P. H. DONOVAN.
Fort Hawley, Montana, Oct. 1, 1883.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
The co-partnership hitherto existing between
the unltersigned, under the lirm name of Myers,
Buck & Co.,is dissolved at this date. Any mem
her of the late firm will pay all liabilities or col
lect bills due. IRa MYERS,
D. W. BUCK.
)M. CARROLL.
October 27, 1883.
ESTRAY NOTICE.
Came to my ranch, on the Teton, on or about
the 6th day of June, one Sorrel Mare, with saddle,
and branded B L on left hip. Owner can have the
same by proving property and paying charges.
je2ltf JOHN A. BLACKABY.
LOST.
One bay, bald face horse branded J-P on left
shoulder, figure 2 on left hip. One black mare
mule branded figure 2 on left hip. Both animals
shod all round. A liberal reward will bepaid for
the delivery of the animals at the Park Sta bles, or
for any information that will lead to their recov
HARRIS & LEWIS.
jly7d&w.
C For $673.
French Bu, Bolt, Smtters, Elevators, c.
Portable omr Mill an Coran hehlers
For Parmers.
EVERYTHING A MILLER NEEDS.
WrSxnD on3 PAMPELY. ALD PaxcU LisT.
THE BIMPSON & GAULT MPG. 00.
Established 1844. CINCINNATI. O0.
RIVER
or.T; rnkln ad ;lowert.,
a4r; 2Deaton, M. T
Urqi-ll' 5;
It: r I W
SADDLERY..
cow O YS' HEADQUARTERS!
ITOCK 8ADLugh8 TO ORiLH Fine Harness
From the following trees:
• HAND-MADE I
Half-Breed, Solid Fork, Montana
t Stock, Vasika, Lehman,
d Texas Iron Fork, m £ A
[s Still, Love, To li.lss of All Grades
d Ferseike.
0
if TO ORDER !
it Chaps made to order from best quality of calf Buggy an' Team Whips,
skin! Quirt's lackamore Reatas C
Spanise Martingales, Half- H.RSE CLOLHING,
It Breed Bits, Inlaid
at Spurs, Cantenas, 11NOS%1 BAGI, SWEAT PADS!
Cartridge
Belts.
a
a
All Work Warranted, and Hand-Made!
te
ty SATISFACTION CUARANTEED OR MONEY REFUNDED.
DO JOE SULLIVAN,
of
id FRONT STREET, - - - - FORT BENTON, M. T.
'is
ESTRA Y NOTICES.
TAKEN UP.
Came to my wood yard on or about the first of
September last, one white mare about 8 years old,
branded T.S. enclosed in a circle on left thigh, the
circle crossing the S about the centre, one half
being in and the other half out; had a rawhide
rope on her neck; has a very sore back. Owner
can have her by proving property and paying
charges of this advertisement,
W. B. SHANKS,
ocl7tf Coal Banks, M. T.
Estray Notice.
Left my ranch on Wolf creek about Sept. 15th,
eight head of horses and mares branded as follows:
One grey mare, trim built, weight 900 pounds,
branded J on right thigh. One black horse, star
in forehead, branded P on right thigh. One pinto
mare, branded 76 combined on right thigh. One
black horse branded A on left shoulder. One sor
rel horse, strip in face, no brands. One bay bald
face horse, stocking leg, white eyes, no brands.
One brown horse, white feet, star in forehead, snip
on nose, branded D, with a bar across it, on left
shoulder. One bay horse, snip on nose and star in
forehead, branded A on left shoulder. A liberal
reward will be paid for the return of the above, or
information that will lead to their recovery.
J. J. LEVENGOOD,
o2dw30d Stanford, M. T.
$200 Reward.
Stolen from my ranch on Careless creek, on the
night of Sept. 22, 1883, one dark brown mare,
weight about 1250 pounds, branded K on left
shoulder, large brand) 8 or 9 years old, left hind
foot white, short tail, mane worn on neck by col
lar.. $50 will be paid for return of mare or infor
mation that will lead to her recovery, and $200 for
the mare and thief or information that will lead
to his apprehension, P. I. MOUL,
oldaw30d Bercail, 51. T.
ESTRAY NOTICE.
Came to my ranch on Sun River about 2 months
ago, a dark sorrel horse, with bald tace and four
white feet, branded F. IM. on left hip and shod all
round. Owner can have same by proving property
and paying charges.
auldw4t WM. HEALY,,
Taken Up.
Came to my ranch, July slet, 1883, one black
horse branded wV D on left shoulder. One gray
norse, blotched brand on right shoulder. The
owner is requested to prove property, pay charges
and take them away.
(CHESTER EATON,
Augl7d&wtf Fort Benton, MI. T.
Estray Taken Up
Came to my ranch, on the south side of the riv
er, below the mouth of the Marras, three horses,
two sorrell and one chestnut sorrell brana ed cir
cle K on left shoulder, and one branded with
anchor on left shoulder, (brand partly effaced)
and circle cross on left hip. On the chestnut is
branded 2 on left shoulder. ' he owners can
have the horses ou paying charges and the cost of
n si advertisement.
jSOd " I. N. CHURCHILL
ESTRAY NOTICE.
Le t my ranch, on Spring Creek branch of the
Shonkin, about three weeks ago, one off colored
pony, white streak on face, branded S, on left ribs,
bar on shoulder and another brand on left thigh.
Had on a double cinch saddle and halter head
stall. The finder will be suit-bly rewarded on
leaving information at this office or atI G Baker
& Co.'s. O. A. PARSONS.
August 1, 1883-tf
ESTRAY NOTICE.
Left at my ranch, on Big Spring creek, in place
of horse stolen, one grey mare branded S on left
shoulder and A on left hip. Owner can have same
by proving property and paying charges of this
advertisement. J.L. CLEGG,
aul4tf Reedaforr, Montana.
$26.00 REWARD.
Strayed from the wood yard of W. B. Shanks.
on the Missouri river near the Coal Banks, one
buckskin horse branded 8 on left side of neck nn
der the mane, dim brand on left shoulder, weight
about 800 pounds. Also one bay horse branded
joined AF on left shoulder, weight about 850
pounds. A reward of $25.00 will be paid if de
livered at the Park Stables, Fort Benton, M. T., or
$20.00 will be paid for any information which
will lead to their recovery.
Aug25dtf.
$50 Reward.
Strayed or stolen from the premises of
R. Beauvis, Pincher Creek, N. W. T.,
about May 20th, one bay mare, three
years old, white star on forehead, and
white strip on nose, branded R B on left
shoulder. Any person giving informa
tion that will lead to her recovery will re
ceive the above reward from the owner.
Apply to Gazette office, Fort Macleod,
N. W. T. jin22dwtf.
STRAYED OR STOLEN.
Fi'om the Capiani raneh, Belt Creek, M. T., two
large blZak horses, three and four years old,
btanded (TL combined) on left sherider and hip.
Beth had headhalters on. A liberal reward will
be 1aid for their retuarn or any information that
wilSead to their recovery.
MADAxE CAIr.IAIe, Cappiani Valley.
n80daw80d. -
UkARES LOST.
Strayed or stolen from between B36y and Koo
tanie rivers, N. W. T., on or aboutteM i of June
last, twelve mares branded J onogm on
1OedIaide4r. Any person ionlermatioa
wrenlred to t coir suitably re
auorlt aeo T.
aulttt
es~sex~wwson or P assa
BBaker&r
f -
SPRING OF 1883.
NEW DEPARTURE.
Finding that our rapidly increasing sales are not allowing us to
d attend properly to all our former lines of trade, we
have sold out our Hardware, Furniture and
r
d Queensware, and will confine ourselves to
R0CE8RIELS.
- Dr) Goods, Boots and Shoes,
k Hats and Caps Gents' furnishing Goods
Clothing, Wooden and
Harness and Willow Wares
Saddlery.
We will also keep Mentioi
ba falland well as- among others
sorted line of Jthe tamous
MITCHELL STEEL SKEIN WAGONS, CHAMPION REAPERS,
STUDEBAKER SPRING WAGONS, CHAMPION 'MOWERS,
MILBURN SPRING WAGONS, TIGER HAY RAKES,
DEIDRICK HAY PRESSES,
S MOLINE BREAKING MOLINE SULKY PLOWS.
and STIRRING PLOWS Jersey ille SULKY PLOWS.
12 to 16 inch FANNTNG"MILLS,
d SCOTCH HARROWS.
GRAIN and WOOL SACKS.
SPECIALTIES:
e PEPER TOBACCO SHEEP DIP, LUG LEAF EXTRA STRENGTH,
HAWKEYE THREE STRAND BARBED STEEL WIRE.
TENT AND WAGON COVERS, HAND and MACHINE MADE, all sizes.
e We will ship the largest and most complete line of Groceries that
t ever eame toyort Benton fOr that traae. .We havemae eaour requi.
o sititn for Fan.yShol4t4~il very elaborate, and will madertake
to furmish anything tnthatisnetWati;~ ay-be called for. Our fa.
cilities for lSing orders are greatlyimproved, and all orders
will receive prompt and c re . ~a1 altAOiit.wning our own
f steamboat transportation we will lay our goods down in
Benton this year at one and a quarter centsperpound from
I Chicago and at. Louis, and we propose to give our cus.
tomers the beneft t fthis low rate in prices on or goods,
Having;·oene out of the Indian Trading business we
, will devote aourselves to lthe taeof larmers and
ranchmena, te whom we.ersie delaliueemn.;
March I. G;.B- ker & C.
MONTAINA eWILE!S
TUnder the Dersona management of
Twe t ab tod M b Ra
4 ·4I.RW U
t. J. WACKERLIN. T. C. POWER & BRO(J.JG. BAKER & CO.
L . . WACGRLIN& CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Hardware,
BAR IRON AND
WACON TIMBERS,
Horse-sho and Nails,
Tinware, Stoves, Queensware, Glassware, Tin Roofing and Sheet Iron
Goods of Every Description.
Charter Oak and Acorn
Cooking and Heating Stoves.
The Celebrated WESTMINSTER
Soft Coal Base Burners.
THE BEST AND ONLY SUCCESSFUL BASE BURNER IN USE:
Our stock of Queensware is the largest and most complete ever brought to Montana
and comprises every article required by hotels and families.
PLAIN AND FANCY TOILET, DINNER AND TEA SETS
Of every style and quality.
Genuine Cut Glass Bar Tumblers, Plain and Fa.ey Goblets
for family and hotel use.
Our Wagon Timbers are of the Best Seasoned Hard W oods,
and consist of all woods used in building a d repairing wagons, carriages and buggies
We have complete stock of
TIN GOODS!
Including Tin Roofing, Gutters.nd Pipes, and will contract to do all kinds of roofin
repairing, etc. Tin goods ot every desctiption MADE TO ORDER on shor
notice and at reasonable prices. We propose to keep one of the largest
and best supplied establishmentsof the kind in Montana Territory
and will spare no pans or expense to give
ENTIRE SATISF CTON TO OUR PATRONS.
gAgent for the LAFLIN & RAND POWDER COMPANY.
M LL " " Z11-- 1 --L-k I -1L-L
,,%NI~TER, M0CULOH o
POST TRADERS,
Fort Assinaboine, M. T.
BRANCH HOUSE, CONNECTION,
.AB Bre oooadýtr, &X Ooamara & C
Wholesale & Retail Dealers, Q POST TRADERS,
Wilder's LsdinP, I , , , , T, FORT MAGINNIS, - - -M. T.
CARRY A FULL AND COMPLETE STOCK OF
a1 Morclnliso Doaidnel by Tra~i of to Torrfitory.
apl2d&wtt
THE LEADING HOTEL.
-..~
EA" tLýTOt OPD- "1888.
The reputation of this well-known house for neatness, careful managern. t and
BEST TABLE IN THE CITY
will be maintained
JERE SULLIVAN, Proprietor
J. H. McKngl t&co.'
Post Traders,
And Dealers in
FORT SHAW, - M.T.
We are in receipt of a large and complete stock of goods consisting of
Dry GOods, Notions, Groceries, Drugs, Boots and Shoes, Cloth
Ing, Hats and Caps, Hardware, Woodenware,
Crockery, Harness, Wool Socks and
Twine, Tents, Wagon Sheets,
AGRICOJULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, ETC.
WOOD'S IMPBOVED MOWERS, HAPGOOD'S SULKY PLOWS,
IMPROVED SULKY RAKES, and STUDEBAKERB WAGONS.
t3aWe have on hand and to ar Ve a larger stock than erey before. Ranchmen and
stookun are repectfully invitd to examine our goods and prices before pur
" ifu1f' ng els iew;here
- * ... . AW, -M.T., June 1, 1882.
J. H. Mo]ight & Co.

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