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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, December 22, 1880, Image 1

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THLE RIVtE Be1.
Vol, I. Fort Benton, .Mnontana, Wednesday, December 22, 1880. N. 9
WILLIA MS, WRIGHT & STEVENS,
PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS.
Terms,..... .............$5.00 per Year.
RATES OF ADVERTISING:
One Column, 1 year ................... ........ 175
6 months....................... 100
, 3 " .......................... . 75
lalf Column, 1 year ........ .............. 100
6 months ...................... 75
3 " ............... ....... 40
O(nc-Third Column, 1 year...................... 80
6 months .................. 45
3 months .................. 30
Qutarter Column, 1 year ........................... 75
6 months ................... 40
,, 3 months ..................... 30
Three inches, 1 year .................... ......... 50
,, 6 months ........................ 30
3 months. ..................... 25
Professional Cards, 1 inch, 1 year ................. 15
Rates for Transient Advertisements given at office.
1)FFICIAL DIREUTORY OF MONTANA.
DELEGATE IN CONGRESS.
L{on. MARTIN MAGINNIS, Helena.
Office. Name. Residence.
G )vtrnor.......... BENJ. F. POTTS,.......... Helena.
.acretary.......... JAS. II. MILLS......Deer Lodge.
Chief Justice.. ..D. S. WADE........... .Helena.
tie E. J. CONGER,.....Virginma City
ssocate J ustices W. J. GALBRAITH, Deer Lodge
U. . District Attorney, J. L. DRYDEN.......Helena
L. S. Marlhan, ALEX. C. BOTKIN............
Surveyor General..R. 11. MASON................Helena.
Register Land Office, JAS. II. MOE........... "
Receiver Land Office, F. P. STERLING...... "
Collector Internal Revenue, T. P. FULLER.. "
Collector Customs, T. A. CUMMINGS........ Benton.
DrSTRICT ATTORNEYS AND CLERBKS,
First District, F. K ARMSTRONG ........ Bozeman
Second District, ALEX. H. MAYHEW....Deer Lodge.
Third District, T. J. LOWRY ...............Helena.
Clerk 1st Dist. Court, THEO. MUFFLY.Virginia City.
Clerk 2d dist. co'rt, GEO. W. IRVINE, 2d, Deer Lodge
Clerk 3d Dist. Court, ALEX. H. BEATTIE.... Helena.
UNITED STATES ASSAY OFFICE.
Assayer, RUSSEL B. HARRISON ............. Helena
Melter, M. A. MEYENDORFF................ Helena.
TERRITORIAL OFFICERS.
Auditor, JOSEPH P. WOOLMAN .............Helena.
Treasurer, D. H. WESTON ............ ........elena.
Warden of Penitentiary, W. W. BOTKIN Deer Lodge
Sup't Public Schools, W. EGBERT SMITHII .... Butte.
Supreme Court Reporter, C. HEDGES.... .... Helena.
Clerk Supreme Court, ISAAC R. ALDEN..... Helena.
UNITED STATES EXAMINING SURGEON.
W. R. BULLARD...... .......................... Ieena
BOZEMAN LAND DISTRICT.
Rogister,DAVIS WILLSON..............Bozeman.
Receiver, J. V. BOGERT ....................Bozeman.
TERRITORIAL COURTS.
Territory of Montano, SS.-The undersigned, Jus
tices of the Supreme Court of Montana Territory,
being assemble:i at the seat of government for said
Territr f, hereby make the following order in rela
tion to the times and places for holding the District
Courts of said Territory, and order the same of record:
FIRST DISTRICT-E. J. CONGER, Judge.
At VIRGINIA CITY, in Madison county, the second
Monday of November, and the third Monday of March.
At RADERSBURI , in Jefferson county, first ilonday
of September, and the third Tuesday of February.
At BOZEMAN, in Gallatin county, the third Monday
of October, and the third Monday of April.
At MILEs CITY, in Custer county, the fourth .lon
day of September, and the fourth Monday of H y.
SECOND DISTRICT-W. J. GALBRAITIr, Y.bId.eA
In Deer Lodge county, at DEER LODGE CIv', .:s:,un..d
Monday in April; first Monday in Sept;mner ; first
Monday in December.
In Missoula county, at MiSSOULA, fourth Monday in
June; second Monday in November.
In Beaverhead county, at BANNACK, first M . day in
June; second Monday in October.
THIRD DISTRICT-D. S. WADE, Judge.
At HELENA, in Lewis and Clarke County, first Mon
day in March, and the fifth Monday in November.
At DIAMOND CITY, in Meagher county, the third
Monday in April, and the third Monday in October.
At FORT BENTON, in Choteau county, the irst Mon
day in May, and the third Monday in September.
DECIUS S. WADE, Chief Justice.
E. J. CONGER, Associate Justice.
Attest :--I. R. ALDEN, Clerk.
H. P. ROLFE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(Associated with Sanders dc Cullen.)
U. S, Deputy IMineral Surveyor.
Ten years' experience in government surveying. The
best instruments used. Collections, insurance
mining, homestead and all land clahis
attended to.
OFFICE, NEAR WETZEL'S,
FRONT STREET, FORT BENTON.
JOHN W. TATTAN,
ATTORNEY and COUNSELOR AT LAW
Office of the County Clerk,
FORT BENTON, - - - MONTANA.
R. W. CUMMINGB,
Fort Benton, - MVontdna.
CONTRACTOR FOR
EXCAVATIONS.
BUILDING STONE FURNISHED,
N. H. WEBSTER,
----Wholesale and Retail dealer in----
Tobaccos and Cigars,
SNUFF, PIPES, SIIOKERS' ARTIVLE..,
Confectionery,
Fruits and
Ammunition.
Main St., opp, First Nat. Bank,
HIELENA, . . . . ItO ~NTANA.
Fine Out Chewing and Vanity Fair
j Smoking Toba oos,
T. E. COLLINS, L. H. HERSHFIELD,
CHAs. E. DUER, A. HERSHFIELD,
Fort Benton. Helena.
-OF
NORTHERN MONTANA
Transact a General Banking
Business.
Keep current accounts with merchants, stock men
and others, subject to be drawn against by
checks without notice.
PAY INTEREST on TIME DEPOSITS
We buy and sell Exchange on the commercial centers
of the United States.
WE WILL GIVE SPECIAL ATTENTION TO TiHE
BUSINESS OF NORTHERN AND CENTRAL
MONTANA,
And will make such loans to stock men an ] farmers
as are suited to their requirements.
Local Securities a Specialty.
Collections and all other business entrusted to us wil
receive prompt and careful attention.
COLLINS, DUEII & CO.
RECORD BUILDING. FORT BENTON, M,. T.
J, A. KANOUSE,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
FORT BENTON, - - MONTANA.
NOTARY PUBLIC and JUSTICE OF THE PEA CE.
Main St., bet. Baker and St. John.
FRED, H, ANDERSON,
NEWS AGENT,
POST OFFICE BUILDING,I
IHELENA, - - MIONTANA.
Dealer in Books, Stationery, Fancy Goods and Notions,
Tobacco, Imported Cigars and Pipes.
Subscriptions taken for all leading Periodicals
and Newspapers
AT PUBLISHERS' RATES.
RINGWALD BROSI CO&0
PAWNBROKERS,
UPPER MAIN STREET,
RELENA, •. " " - ONTANa.
Oppoite the First National Bank.
TE' xtraordinary Bargains in Pawnbrokers' Unredeem
_1 ed Pledges, at Ringwald Bros. & Co.'s.
XTWe have a large stock of unredeemed pledges, con
Vsisting of Watches, Diamonds, all kinds of Jew
elry, Field and Opera Glasses, Gems, Riflles, Pistols,
Etc., Etc.
51 h Cost $900. One large, elegant Diamond
$ 55 Cross and Pendant, beauntifully set with six
large Brilliants, at Pawnbrokers.
AM C~ost $850. A handsome Solitaire Diamond
SOUVU Ring, six karat, brilliant stone. beautifully
set, at Pawnbrokers.
5 00 Cost $350. A beautiful six karat stone, to
J match the above; would make an elegant
pair of ear rings, at Pawnbrokers,
0 i O 00 worth of Diamonds; the largest. azid
S finest stock in Montana. We have
Diamond Rings of every description, cluster and solh
taire. Prices from $25 to 5(o0.
Diamond Ear Drops of the very latest settings, and
of all sizes; stones as pure and clear as drops of
water; prices from $50 to $1,000 per pair. We make a
specialty of the finest goods..
G ents and Ladies' Gold Watches at.Bargains, at
SPawnbrokers.
('- ents' Gold Vest and Guard Chains of every des
-_ cription, at Pawnbrokers.
SPECIAL.
We would call the attention of stock men and-all who
are in want of Field Glasses, as we make a spe
cialty of the largest and most powerful glasses
made in the world. Glasses worth $75 we
sell for $40; one worth $65 for $35;
one worth $50 for $25; one worth
$30 for $15; one worth $20
for $10.
L arge asssrtment of revolvers, some Smith & Wes
L son, trimmed with rubber, double action; Colt's
double action 45 calibre; almost new, at half price, at
Pawnbrokers.
M/oney to loan on all goods of value at Ringwald
IVI Bros. & Co.
tihe above goods are unredeemed pledges, and will
Sbe sold at half their value. All goods warrant
ed as represented, or in any case not found so, money
will be refunded cheerfully,
RILGWALD BROS. & Co,, Pawnbrokers.
PROVIDENGE BAKERY
Benton St., behind Marshall's Saloon,
FORT BEN TON.
LBEON P. ROCRON, Prop'tor.
Keeps large stock of
Bread, Pies and Cakes
Always on hand and cheap for cash.
A position as salesman or clerk ~l~in some irst-cl~as
grocery or dry goqds house in Benton. Have had an
experience of 15 years. Apply at this oflice.
i . . .. .
TELEGRAPHIC.
Important to Kettlers.
WASHINGTON, December 18.-There has
been and still is much well-grounded com
plaint of the great expense and other hard
ships to which settlers are frequently sub
jected by having to travel long distances from
home and being witnesses to determine at
remote places the mineral or agricultural
character of their l:nds. Under the
the present practice, the registers and re
ceivers of their respective land districts are
at liberty to fix the place for taking testi
mony in any particular contest wherever they
see fit, and the influence of wealthy specula
tors or powerful corporations is often exerted
in such manner in this regard as to work a
practical denial of justice to poor men who
cannot afford to mak9 long journeys.
Representative Pag$,, since his arrival here
a fortnight ago, has urged this evil upon the
attention of the General Land Office, and at
his instance Commissioner Williamson has
prepared and issued to-day the following cir
cular, addressed to all Registers and Receiv
ers throughout the the country :
"GENTLEMEN: In every case where it be
comes necessary under the law and existing
instructions of this office, to require a hear
ing to be held and testimony taken for the
purpose of ascertaining the mineral or agri
cultural character of land, you are directed
to cause such hearing to be heard before a
duly qualified officer, whose office is located
nearest the land in dispute, the distance to be
computed by ordinary routes of travel.
Whenever local land offices come within this
rule, the hearing will be held before the
Register and Receiver. It is intended to cause
these hearings to be held, so far as practi
cable, in such manner as to cause the least
inconvenience to the persons interested.
Should it appear, therefore, by written stipu
lation of all the parties, that that purpose will
be best subserved by the designation of any
particular officer authorized to administer
oaths, within the land district in which the
land in controversy is situated, the instruc
tions therein may be departed from in accor
dance with such stipulation. It may also
happen that the officer who would otherwise
be selected is an interested party, or some
other good reason may appear why his de
signation would be improper, and in such
case you will direct the hearing to be held
before the next nearest officer.
An Interesting Case.
CHICAGo, December 21.-The daily NYew-s
says : The doctors are puzzled and interest
ed by a peculiar case on the west side, 86
Seeley avenue. Willie Crawford, aged 14
years, son of Captain Crawford, of a tug
boat, has for seven years been sweating
blood at times, and lately has had severe at
tacks which alarmed his parents. His in
firmity usually comes on him after taking a
cold. Great black spots appear on his
body from which the blood drops the size of
a pin, and blood flows from his mouth, nose,
eyes, stomach, and' ven from his bladder and
kidneys. No pain accompanies these dis
charges, but they make his blood thin and
weaken him. Sudden fright or excitement
will easily check the flow. He is mentally
bright, and his father, mother, brothers and
sisters are strong and healthy. The physi
cians who have taken into question his case
propose sending him to Edinburg and Lon
don for examination by the academy of sur
geons.
Delegate Cannon.
Cit0AGO, December 17.-Delegate Cannon
of Utah, who has four wives and a seat in
Congress, is not disturbed by the reports from
Utah which represent that Gov. Murray will
withhold his certificate and give it to Camp
bell, upon the ground that Cannon is married
too much and has never been a legally natur
alized citizen of thi United States. Cannon
says: "Ithink the Governor will delay as
long as possible in giving me a certificate. I
doubt if he will give it to Campbell. No one
disputes my majority nor the fairness of the
election. The Governor is only a ministerial
officer. He cannot judge of my election.
The House is the only body empowered to
judge of the election and qualifications of its
own members. Campbell will, in all proba
bility, contest my seat. He claims that I am
not a legally naturalized citizen of the United
States. The question was settled by the
XLIVth Congress. My seat was contrsted
at that time, the question of citizenship being
the principal one involved. While no report
on that question was ever made to the House
the members of the committee were unani
mously of the opinion that I had been prop
erly naturalized.
Division of Dakota.
N.xw YORK, December 20.-The Tribune's
Wash~ngton special saysrs: Delegate Bennett
of Dakota, is vigorously laboring; to create a
sentiment among the members of the House
of Representatives in favor of his bill to di
videthe Territory of Dakota, to admit the
southern part into the Union ass a State. Thle
bill has.been ref erred to tjhe commiee on
Territories which as yet h1.s taken no -natidn
'I
regarding it. Bennett proposes to divide the
present Territory on the 46th parallel of north
latitude, thus throwing about 60,000 square
miles into the new State and 70,000 into the
Territorial sub-division. The population of
the new State would be about 100,000 and
that of the Territory about 36,000.
A Black Hills Railroad.
DEADWOOD, December 20.-Work on the
Central City, Deadwood & Eastern Railroad
begins on Monday, with Archibald McAr
thur, of Chicago, as contractor. The road,
under the contract, is to be completed by the
first of August. The road will connect Dead
wood, Central and Lead cities with the coal
fields and foothills. Its course is down White
wood canyon, with a tunnel through the
mountain 1,500 feet in length.
Secretaiy of the Navy.
Chicago, December 20-The Jour,aZl's
Washington special says: A mass delegation
are working to secure the appointmenit of
Governer Rice as Secretary of the Navy, to
succeed Mr. Thompson. The matter has
been fully discussed, and the delegation is a
unit in deciding to press Govornor Rice's
nomination. As General Davens will be
shortly transferred to the supreme bench, the
members of the delegation think no objection
can be raised to the Governor's appointment.
Ireland'
DUBLIN, December -20.--The report that
the government intended to prohibit all Land
League ipeetings in Queens county was in
correct. The prohibition only applied to the
meeting at Callohill, which was convened for
the purpose of denouncing a landlord who
sought the assistance of the bankruptcy court
to recover his rents.
Two hundred hussars, 400 infantry and
100 constabulary arrived at Callohill on Satur
day with ambulance wagons. The promo
ters of the meeting had issued notices aban
doning the projected meeting at Caliohill,
but afterwards issued a placard convening a
meeting a few miles off. The troops, how
ever, have arrived on the ground. A resi
dent magistrate forbade the meeting, and said
he would disperse it with buckshot or what
ever was necessary. The meeting was then
finally abandoned.
At a meeting at Carragh two hussars, sta
tioned close to the platform, carried on sie
nals with the camp, which was close at hand.
There were also fifty policemen in ambush.
A great diversity of opinion exists among
the prominent land leagures in regard to the
course to adopt if the government introduces
a land bill which, although falling short of
the programme of the league, would substan
tially benefit tenants. Some are in favor of
fighting it out to the end; others say that to
reject a good bill would be to incur a great
responsibility. The extremists say if a par
tial measure is accepted the question would
be dormant for ten years or more, and the
work would have to begun afresh. There
are now over 500 branches of the land league.
Sullivan, M. P., speaking at the Mullingar
meeting, said their fathers had faced the
sword and bullet for Ireland, and the Irish
men were not now to be frightened by the
suspension of the habeas corpus act or the
proclamation of martial law.
LoNDON, December 20.-A battalion of
Scott's Guards goes to Ireland to-night.
The troop ship Himilaya is expected at
Portsmouth to-day. She has been ordered to
disembark a battalion of the rifle brigade at
Queenstown,
NOTES OF NEWS.
Domestle.
More than 100 cases of typhoid fever are
reported in Montreal.
The certificates of the electoral vote have
been received by mail from every State in the
Union.
There is a strong feeling on the stock boar]
at New York, and stocks show a general up
ward tendency.
The commissioners appointed to re-count
the population of South Carolina, report the
census as practically correct.
The President has nominated W. B. Woods
of Alabama, to succeed Justice Strong in the
United States Supreme Court.
The President of the Erie railway denies
the report that the company's capital stock is
to be increased to twelve million dollars
Mackey, the California millionaire, and a
wealthy citizen of Philadelphia have given
$50,000 each for the endowment of Bowdoin
College.
The pastor of the church of Notre Dame
(Roman Catholic) warned his congregation
against patronizing Sara Berinhardt's perfor
mances.
The threatenedo:pposition to the confirma
tion of Judge Woods as Justice btrong's suc
cessor on the Supreme benchi seems likely to
dwindle to small proportions:
The electoral vote of California was de
livered to Vice President Wheeler today by
the venerable Stephen Cooper of Colusa
county, a member of the special messengers
of he elector.al college, who, despite hi 84
years, came on alone across the continent for
that purpose and appeared at the capitol tias
afternoon as head, hate and erect as mos!
men born after the close of the war of 1812
in which he participated.
The National Board of Trade adopted a
resolution favoring the government telegraph
service by a two-third vote. Also commend
ing the statistical efforts of the United States
Consuls.
General Terry has just received advices
from Major Brotherton, at Fort Buford, indi
cating that scout Allison should, on the 11th
inst. have left Wood mountain with the whole
of Sitting Bull's camp, for Fort Buford,
where they will, formally surrender to the.
United States government.
It is reported on good authority that the
vacancies on Gen. Sherman's staff caused by
the death of Col. Andemyed and the promo
tion of Lieutenant Colonel McCook, will be
filled by the appointment of Lieutenant Col.
Dodge of the 23d Infantry and Major Tidball
of the second artillery.
Coke announced in the Senate that on Tues
day next he would ask for the consideration
of the Senate bill providing for the allotment
of lands in severalry to Indians, and extend
ing the laws of the States and Territories over
the Indians. He said the bill was thought to
be important by the Interior Department.
The New York 2Iribune says: If the Isth
mus canal is opened it may become the duty
of this government looking to the safety of
its great interests and possessions on the Paci
fic coast, to insist on acquiring from Colom
bia the territory through which it runs in or
der to be able to fortify its mouths and con
trol its operations'in time of war.
The letter of Wade Hampton, disclaiming
that he intended to challenge Secretary Sher
man when he informed Sherman that his ad
dress was Columbia, attracted much atten
tention. This disclaimer from Hampton was
published becuse of a severe letter from a
South Carolinian living in California, who
charged Hampton with causing the defeat of
Hancock. After summin' up the Democratic
blunders the writer adds.: "But these causes
put together were not sl$potent for harm as
Gen. Hampton's utterances. His speeches
upon the nomination of Hancock and at
Staunton, Va., told terribly against us.
Representative Erritt (Penn.) has prepared
a substitute for the Re-funding bill, now
pending before Congress. It provides that
the Secretary of the Treasury shall be au
thorized to issue notes to the amount of $400
O03,000, of denominations not less than $10,
bearing interest at a rate not exceeding 3 per
cent. per annum, rcdeemable at the pleasure
of the United States after one year, and pas
able in ten years from date of issue; but net
more of said notes shall be redeemed in any
one fiscal year than the amount of the sink
ing fund for that year. The parlicular notes
to be redeemed from time to time shall be de
termined by lot under such rules as the Secre
tary of the Treasuiry shall prescribe. This
will be offered by Representative Kel
lock as a substitute when the Wood re-fund
ing bill is called up.
Fore1gno
Emile De Girardin, the great journalist, re
tires from public life.
Parnell, Demill and Dillon have received a
letter threatening them with death.
A Hague dispatch says the Second Cham
ber has voted to grant 1,000 guilders for the
Arctic expedition next year.
The British cabinet has decided on coercive
meaeures in the further disposition of the
government on the Irish troubles.
It is stated that the British government in
tends to promote the emigration of Iristh far
mers to the northwest to aid in settiinlg the
land question.
A meeting of Orangemien was heli
Loughhall, Ireland, on the 17th, at which
resolutions were passed favoring peasant
proprietorship.
It is reported that ex-Empress Euge.nie has
arrived in Paris to secure the releaise of .her
god-daughter, Baroness De Friedl.nd, who is
charged with forgery.
Fire artir l~i.s oef lte.
L sero us fire, accompanied by a heavy
loss of life, occurred on the evenirng of the
17th at Buffalo, N. Y. Tho fire was diseov
ered in the third story of an im.anse five
story building, owned by G. W. Tafit, and
occupied by Birge & Sons, wal-paper r un
facturers. The building is 80 feet front by
about 300 in depth, and they had about 50
men and boys empioyed at the !resea~t tim,
the business demanding extra help. Ad
of that number were at work, and in iess
than 20 minutes after 'he alarm was given
the building was a 'm1>ss of flames. The
walls crumbled and feli, anid probably buied
twenty or thirty emptl, es, The doors to the
different rooms were hung to swing in; each
had a.heavy spring clo.ng thoem, thereby re
tarding the egress :of fthe occup;alnts. The
building was without fire esca esof any kind
and the terri ,ified worlimen jmped- from the:
windows, and many escteq yath broken
bones and brised booies. T ind the up
per stories, unable to jcp pp eOre P a
momenLt t he window.w d tnen skgk
" •' - : - .:. ,2 " . #.! :..'.. .?-.-' :.-..i ., -, . .. ... : .. • .:..

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