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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, January 05, 1881, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053157/1881-01-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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SARA BERNHARDT IN BUSTON.
A Humorous Take-off on the Furore in thf
East over the Divine Sara.
[Chic, New York.]
The journey from New York to Buston
was of the least exciting, though I was show.
ered with delicate attentions by every one.
The humble boy that conducts the service of
the newspapers on the train made frequent
pilgrimages to my shrine, and insisted on en
dowing me with oranges, apples, confections,
nuts, newspapers, magazines, at the end I
know not what, which he left on my seat.
M. Schwab explained to me that the poor
youth was solicitous to express his admira
tion of Art in the only way in which it was
possible for him to express it, namely, by
making me gifts from his store, and gener
ously suggested that as the lad would ruin
himself by his lavishness, he should insist on
paying the price of the articles out of his
own pocket and charge it to me. I consent,
and at the last station my youthful admirer
bade me farewell, exclaiming, "So-long, Sal
ly." It was a cry of the heart. M. Schwab
had the incident at once telegraphed to the
papers of the country, but, in my opinion,
destroy much of the beautiful simplicity of
the narration by representing that the youth
was an aged millionaire, and that instead of
beenanas, apples, etc., it was diamonds,
pearls and Sixes of the States Uniteds he had
insisted upon conferring on me.
Another incident, which shows the rever
ence for Art entertained by the people Amer
ican. We discover that the brakeman on our
car was selling the privilege of staring the
window through at me for fifty cents, to the
inhabitants of the Connecticut and the Mas
sachusetts. The saleratus! (Mlle. Bern
hardt clearly intended to say "Le scelerat !"
"The scoundrel !") If the imbeciles had on
ly come to me I would have let them s'tare at
me for half the money. Yet such is the way
in which Art is degraded, and the Artist is
robbed of her reward. M. Schwab was just
ly indignated at the imposition, and went out
to punish the brakeman, whom, he subse
quently inform me, he shot in the neck with
his pistol of pocket. Such is the code of M.
le Judge Lynch on the frontier American!
As we approach Buston, another delicate
attention was pay me. The Mayor of the
city was unable to attend and present me
with the keys of the place, according to M.
Schwab's previous arrangement, as he had
unexpectedly to go out and see a man. But
the president of the railroad send the vice
president in advance to welcome me and ar
range for the transfer of my baggages. He
was a man of a most distinguish appearance
and affable manner, and M. Schwab explain
to me that he had received innumerable dec
orations from the princes, etc., that had trav
eled by way of this road. Indeed, so many
medals, etc., have been conferred upon this
gentleman, that he carry them over his arm
fastened to straps of lcather. M. Scnwab
told me that they were all of pure gold; I
forget what the gentleman's name is, but his
initials are "R. R.," for all the medals are
inscribe "B. and A. R. R.," "N. Y. C. and
HL R. H. R.," "N. Y., N. H. and H. R. R.,"
"Housatonic R. R.," and the like. When I
say to M. Schwab that I had always thought
the citizens American were forbidden to re
ceive decorations as being contrary to Demo
cra~tic principles, he point out to me that the
Democratic principles had been defeated at
the recent elections. It is, indeed, a droll of
a country.
And, eh ! it is a droll of a city, this Buston.
The streets run to the cardinal points of the
compass, only the compass must be like the
Sacred College, which contains seventy Car
dinals. The east wind blow here without re
lax,* and dries up everything-even the cod
fish from wuich the Joseph Cooks of New
England frame their appetizing entree, the
lboule do morue (ball of codfish) is dessicated.
The gentlemen all walk with a stern and erect
carriage. Ii. Schwab has explain to me that
during the war the people of New England
were so inflame of patriotism that they all
swallowed ramrods in order to stiffen the
backbone of the nation. He pleasants, I
think, this agreeable M. Schwab. As for the
ladies, they have treat me how differently
from their sisters New Yorkishes! They all
appear carrying spectacles, in accordance,
M. Schwab has explain to me, with the reso
lution adopt by the Society of Female Suff
rages, to patronize me-the spectacles indi
cating their affection for the apectacle (a the
atrical performance). With the most deli
cate flattery, too, all the plump, hideous wo
men are carefully forbidden to promenade
the streets, and none are allowed to show
themselves who are not of my peculiar style
of beauty. They are ethereal creatures,
fairy-like, angelic, ravishingly lovely-like
Me! M. Schwab informs me that in the
High Schools the teachers of the mathematic
instruct their pupils to define a line as "length
without breadth, like Sara Bernhardt." I
notice, however, one peculiarity of the wo
men-they all wear blue stockings and india
rubber coats and goloshes.
The hotel of Buston is very cQmforatable.
At least it was consider to be very comfort
able by a prince who occupied the suite of
rooms now placed at my disposal, and in
reality it is, but I guard myself from saying
so. It would seem, if I did, as if I admitted
Royalty to the same level with Art. At the
hotel I make the acquaintance of American
cookery-the ball of codfish, the bread twice
(Mile. Bernhardt has takenr "twioe" as the
English of "bia" in '"pain bid,', instead of
"brown"), the pork to the bean. Ther pork
to the bean, I am informed, is only properly
cooked in Buston. Eb, well, then, 1 admit
frankly that when I go anywhere else I will
not order it. A dramatic critic whom I ad
mit to breakfast with me, gazed upon me
through his spectacles, and murmured that
pork to the bean was a dish fraught with the
highest and most reticulated symbolism; that
Pythagoras, Diodorus Siculus, Publius Maci
laginus, Ralph Waldo Emerson.-I know
not what he would have continue, but it was
arrived the hour of rising from the table,
and, extending my hand to him, I give him,
in accordance with the instructions of M.
Schwab, the cold shake.
One thing pained and shocked me outside
of measure. I had understood that the poets,
MR. Long Fellow, Olivier Wendell Holmes,
Emerson, and others, would call on me, em
brace me on the forehead, and read odes to
me, my beauty, and my genius, as Victor
Hugo does in Paris. Well, not one of them
came! And yet they call Buston the Athens
of America!
An unfortunat countertime has marred in
some measure the pleasure of my visit to
Buston. I was invite, in a series of resolu
tions, to address the Buston Society of Fe
male Suffrages, and on proceeding to the ball
found the President delivering an address in
which she eulogized me in ani excessive but
merited manner, praising my devotion to the
sacred cause of Art, to push my way in
which I had declined the alluring blandish
ments of the tyrant Man and .the social ties
which make woman a bondslave. "We all
feel," she cry herself, "that the cause of Wo
man has received a powerful impulse for
good from our sister's example, and proudly
take her in our arms and bid the world con
template that paragon of spinsters, Mlle. Sara
Bernhardt, the Anna D'Ickinson, the Suzanne
B. Anthony of la belle France!" I prepare
to reply to this oration, and have hardly said,
"My sisters, upon quitting my hotel an hour
ago, I said to my son-" when, with a shriek
of "Her son ! ! !" every woman in the hall
has a crisis of ti nerves : shrieks reverber
ate of all sides, and in less than three minutes
the only evidence that the room was recently
occupy is afforded by the presence of one
shoe of gum, and the manuscript of a series
of resolutions. I am dumb with amazement
and rndignation, but M. Schwab explain to I
me that the ladies present suddenly remember
that they have to attend a class in M. Alcott's
School of Philosophy, and therefore have to I
hurry away. All of a same, they might have
said "Good-bye,"
I have seen the historic building 3 of this
interesting city. There is Faneuil Hall; and
also the Uncommon-it was formerly called
the Common, but the name was felt not to be
adequate to the importance of the place; I
was drag there, and were to say, "It is Un
ion ;" and also the Old South Church, where
they preserve the cradle of Mlle. Liberty, the
first white child born in America; anid Biun
ker Hill Monument, where Warren fell and
was killed, at which I am not surprised, the
distance being so great. It is, I believe, a
monument to the immortal M. Georges Wash
ington. With a delicate flattery exclusively
American, the gamima of Boston affect to
believe, when they meet me, that the Bunker
Hill monument has descended to lake the air.
I was ask yesterday whether I had yet visited
Plymouth Rock, and, being unwilling to re
veal my ignorance, replied diplomatically
thatiM. Plymouth Rock had left his card on
me, but I had not yet decided whether, as a
single woman, it would be strictly proper for
me to visit him. I added that I intended to
make a bust of him. This announcement
was received with manifestations of the most
awe-stricken delight and admiration.
My first performance was an immense suc
cess. I played Pliedre, and to conciliate the
severely classical tastes of the Athens of
America, dressed in a mackintosh cloak, blue
stockings, shoes of gum, and spectacles. The
applause was immense. I am too much ex
haust to describe my triumph in detail, but
leave that for another letter.
Agree, Mister the Redactor, my salutations
the most impresseds,
SARAh WILLARD BURINARD.
The Author 01 Beautiful Snow.
[Washington Republie.)
By the way, it is time to put an end to a
doubt which seems annually to afflict the pub
lie mind as to who wrote "Beautiful Snow."'
It has been variously attributed to Ada Clare,
Clara Shaw and Billy Winter, and by Mark
Twain to General Joe Hawley, but that was
probably a facetious thought. It is well
known to the men who frequented Pfaff's
say twenty odd years ago-that Florence is
the author of "Beautiful Snow." The idea
was suggested by a conversation which Geo.
Arnold the poet (at Pfaff's at midnight over
his beer) said he had with Ada Clare, then
the chere arnie of Gottschalk. Florence,
quick in conception and impatient in execu
tion, jotted down some lines at a side table,
and after Arnold had assisted the rythm and
smoothed the inequalities resulting from
haste, the poem was read the next night to an
applauding audience of the select few, or
"oyster house critics," as the elder Bennett
called them. It was suggested by Ed. House,
then musical ,critic on the Tfriune, that the
lines be published anonymously as the pro
duction of a woman who hesitated to sign her
name to a confession of shame. There was
a good deal of talk then about the liason ex
isting between -Gottschalk and Ada Clare,
who was called the "Queen of the IBohem
lans," and public opinion, wrong as usual,
settled on her as the author.
FASHION, FRIPPERY AND FOLLY
An exchange says that Mrs Langtry wears
a lovely hood made of zephyr. Perhaps she
keeps it in the weather bureau.
The Empress of Austria has taken to
Ormonde Castle, Kilkenny, for six weeks,
hunting with the Kilkenny hounds.
The Baltimore Gazette accuses a lady,
whose real name is Mrs Reimenchneider, of
traveling under an assumed name. We don't
blame her.
The new style decolette is a revival of the
old shape used when ladies wore what were
called baby waists, the waists being cut
straight across at the top.
The young woman who had many suitors,
and from the time she was 16 until she was
21 rejected them all, referred in her later life
to that period as her "declining years."
Bonnet-strings are out of fashion, says a
Paris correspondent. Gather ye roses while
ye may, young ladies, and wear out the
white plush strings in which you look so well
now.
White petticoats have been abandoned and
the colored balmorals are many pretty styles,
cashmere and silk are the popular material,
though plush is very popular. The silk
skirts are generally lined with flannel and
trimmed with lace.
Worth, the dress-maker, has apparently at
tained his apotheosiA. A little play has just
been brought out in Paris in which be is rep
resented under the name of "Simpson." The
actor who takes the part is made up to won
derfully resemble the dressmaker.
Shrimps are now the favorite ornament of
the ladies, pigs having had their day. Ele
phants are no longer admired. Shrimps now
appear in pearl and gold, coral and ruby, as
brooches, bracelets, 'neck-laces, earrings,
lockets, and shoe-buckles.
Fur cloaks closely follow the fashions in
cloaks of other materials and fabrics, and in
fur-lined goods the new circular called the
princess is an improvement upon the round,
open garment, that was designed for the car
riage or the opera, and not for thestreets.
One of the most beautiful materials for an
evening dress is a changeable satin de Lyon,
the tints being opaline, with tints of pink
and peacock blae of the most delicate shades.
The reverse is of a salmon pink, matching
the color shown on a changeable side of the
satin. The only suitable trimming is hand
some lace.
The woolen fabrics of the season are as
elegant in their way as are those of silk and
velvet, and those of silk and wool, with all
the silk thrown up to the surface, are very
rich. Cashmeres are prettiest trimmed with
velvets; cloth, as already said, with velvet
or plush, but the prettiest fancy fabrics for
trimming fine wooleV are those of wool bro.
'chded in tiny silk patterish The style is now
more fashionable than Pekins. Plain or
fancy velvets and plush are also very much
in favor for trimming cloth, vigogne, cash
mere and other plain woolen tissues for
house as well as street drssses. Young la
dies wear jackets as the favorite wrap,
while cloaks for older women are very long.
Dolmans ho~d their own, and there are many
large, loose' wraps, of which the Japanese,
shirred at the neck, ^and with large pouch
like sleeve, takes the lead. As a fashionable
novelty,(circulars continue popular, and a
new style is shaped to the flgure by two
seams down the back, something like a dol
man. The long Langtry hood with bright
lining is fashionable, especially for young
ladies' wraps and street 'suits, and many
cords, terminating in tassels, halls or spikes,
are employed for trimming 'both cloaks and
dresses.
FRANK'S
NE WS DEPOT.
TOBACCO AND ClIGARS
CONFECTIONERY,
NUITS, CANDIE S
Praits of all Descriptions.
CUTLERY, PLAYING CARDS
SPerfumery and Fancy Soaps.
A Full Line of Smokers' Articles, Seaside Libraries,
Novels of all descriptions, and all the
Illustrated Papers.
PE TER SMVITH,
COFFIN MAKER,
General Under1kker,
HEAD OF BOND STREET,
F.F. HENTON, a MONTANA.
FUtRNITURE REPAIRINC
A SPECIAlTlY.
JOB PRINTING
Parties who desire any work in the line of Book and
Job Printing should get it done at
RIVER PRESS
PRINTING HOUSE.
We are prepared to execute all kinds of
Commercial Job Printing
Such as
BILL BEADS,
LETTER HEADS,
BUSINESS CARDS,
STATE1NVIENTS,
ENVELOPES,
CIRCIULARS.
We have just received from the East a lot of the latest
and newest styles of type, and will in future
make a specialty of
SF-INE PRINT INC
WEDDING CARDS,
Ball Invitations, Orders of Dancing,
NEW YEAR'S CARDS, ETC.
And are well prepared to do all work of this class,
having, it is universally conceded. two of the
most finished job printers in Montana
connected with the estab.
lishment.
POSTERS
And all other large work done to order. and estimates
given on all classes of work. We will aim to
keep up with Eastern styles.
Metropolitan Billiard Hall
HELENA, MONTANA.
M1A!L _ KT(TOWER,
Pro
The above elegantly appointed resort is situated over
Gans & Klein store, corner Main and Broadway.
Drop in and while away a pleasant hour at
"the gentleman's game."
AN ELEGANT CLUB ROOM
Can also be found here.
THE
RESTAURANT.
YARD & FLANAGAN,
Proprietors.
BOARD BY THE WEEK, $8.
Having one of the best of cooks, and under the super
Lvision of Mr. Yard, and buying the very best the,
market affords, we can insure to the pub
lic entire satisfaction.
itEALS AT ALL HOURS OF THE
DAY OR 1NIGHT.
POLITE AND ATTENTIVE WAITER~S.
We pay the top prices for Game, Poultry, and country
- produce.
LEE ISABELL,
Break o' D~ay Saloon.
HAIN STREET.
Juat received, a choice stock of:
FINE KENTUCKY WHISKIES
And Imported Wines
X-1O U - 8
MVE AT MVARKTET
Cor. Bond and Main Streets,
FT. BENTO1N, U olITANA.
All kinds of Meat, Fish. Poultry, Vegetables, etc.
kept on hand. All kinds of Gamein season.
Goods Delivered Free.
C. 8. SANBORN &COI
* PROPIELTORS&
Overland Billiard Parlor
Next to Oyerland fltel.
WINES, IdQUORS &CIGARS
OF THU B1BT BRANDS.
All Drinlis in Season.
Wile PRESTON.
THE "COSMOPOLITAN"
Next door to the Jungle,
FRONT ST., FORT BENTON.
CONWAY & McCABE,
PROPRIETORS
We aim to keep our Bar stocked with the best assort
ment of imported Wines and Brandies, and most
cordially invite our friends to call and
sample our goods.
OM Kentucky Bollrouill ¶sky,
And a choice lot of
IMPORTED and DOMESTIC CIGARS.
NOW ON HAND.
SAMPLES BROS.
Meat Market,
FRONT STREET,
Fort Benton, Montana.
MEATS OF ALL KINDS
IN SEASON.
We have bought a winter's supply of the very best
Beef Cattle, in a condition so good that it insures
the best of meat during the winter and spring.
SAMPLES BROS.
.0
W D
0 02
C, - Or
c ti t o the ce e ra e
6'CO' CD
fmou
g ABO CIA .
PRIVATE L 0OOM
An i aeetapistosretepbi h a
cal n ti
J.H VN , OPo's
LESTER'S~
OLTJB ROOM
T HESLTN GGR
EXTRADITOICON SALON
Whilsks, LWines an Cigars.
WPe klieep istock and hav nowua reorn thadalre qup pan
ti t ywn rof~ the a afren clbrte
Hermwitag Sour Mash.

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