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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, May 11, 1881, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053157/1881-05-11/ed-1/seq-6/

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REVERIE,
"N" for Nannie and "B" for Ben,
I see them now as I saw them then,
On the barl of the oak tree wed;
She sat waist deep in the clover white,
And the squid gold of the June sunlight
Swept over her sweEt young head.
And I stood carving the letters twain,
That time and tempest has all in vain
Striven to blur and blot;
They live in the oak tree's dusky grain,
Stamped as their memory on my brain,
Changing, changing, and fading not.
Oh! the vows that I vowed that day!
Their broken shards in my bosom stay,
Wounding it hourby hour;
Could I be false to one so true!
Dared I be cruel, my love, to you!
Oh, Nannie, my lily flower?
Ere the snow had whitened those letters twain,
In the old church porch you bid your pain,
As I and my bride passed by;
Your eyes were brave, but your cheek grew white
The cheek that I should have pillowed that night.
Where it never now may lie.
Litle Nannie, you are at rest,
The buttercups growing over your breast,
Close by the graveyard gate;
But ah. I live to rue the day,
Gold tempted my steps from love away,
And mine is the sadder fate:
For I'd give the rest of my life to-night,
To see you sit in the clover white,
The sun on your locks of of gold,
And carve once more, as I carved them them,
"N" for Nannie and "B" for Ben,
On the bark of the oak tree old.
FLOATING FANCIES.
It is a sin to steal-a pin, especially a dia
mond pin.
King John, of Abyssinia, is about to be
crowned Negus, and is as proud as punch.
Suppose the managers of the World's Fair
try giving away a chromo with each presi
dency.
Justice used to be represented blind-folded,
but according to modern style smoked glasses
are the thing. Tho world moves.
Carlyle said George Eliot's writings were
simply dull. The old man preferred clear
vinegar to milk for a regular drink.
The hallucination of afflicted people who
regard railroad tracks as deaf and dumb asy
lums is a source of profit to the coroners.
The late Horace Greeley is reported to have
said that "of all horned cattle, a college
graduate is of the least value in newspaper
work.
The inhabitants of the Cannibal Islands
have discovered trichinae in an American
missionary. This is a sad blow at one of
the country's leading exports.
"Yes, sir," said Gallagher, "it was funny
enough to make a donkey laugh. I laughed
till I cried," and then he saw a smile go
round the room, he grew red in the face and
went away mad.
The Nihilists are not such extremists, after
all. They desire the abolition of Siberia as
a place of exile for political offenses, but are
content to have it set apart for amateur elo
cutionists and album poets.
Edwin Booth is too deuced exclusive and
aristocratic even for the Fnglish. They can
not understand it, don't you know. A blast
ed play-actor, by Jove, keeping as mtch
h' alone as voun of the royal family; such~pre
sumption is simply 'orrid.
A young lady who had ordered home a
pair of unusually high-heeled boots was
flushed by the announcement by Bridget,
fresh from answering the door-bell. "If ye
plaise, miss, there's a. mian, in the hall below
wid a pair of shtilts f&r yez.
"Rather a nice city," said Bret Harte to a
friend in Scotland as they rode through a
Scotch.. town on the cars. "What place is
this, anyhow ?" The friend :replied: "This
is Glasgow, where you. haye been consul for
the last two or. three years."
Professor (to the student who writes not
for the masses, but for the educated few):
"You should write so that the most figniorant
of your audience can understand all you can
say.". Student (puzzled): "What part of my
production is not clear to you, sir ?"
Buffalo Bill is not so great an actor as Sal
vini; but when~he dashes upon the stage, kills
seven Indians, puits thirteen to flight, removes
a quantity of .pcalps lined with red flannel,
and rescures the lovelymraideni who is cha~ined
to the stake, the audience appears to be per
fectly satisfied with him1
"The rogues who drilled into and blew open
the town'saf4 in 3fansfield, the other aiglft,
found, ~when they had got it open, that it
was not only empty, but unlocked; and they
'could have opened the door by a turn of the
baxidle. They were so mad~ anddisgusted that
they wond1ered why they didn't die.
No, we-are not a Candidate for the Consn
tate at the.BifandovlandlOOsha Ohalba. WE
liast Conulwt was ervedaup qn toast- a~ .atate
bur accep n'eeof tihe ppointment, in ordei
reiwPresidentu{ ggrg9
* tlnted family: The Mci8pillkiis f~am
Oyi80ne of te ost fasBhionfble~ in Galves~
n.The ~oldma, oever, is ot~ 3s n0c
"She is very proficient on the guitar." "And 1
the boy ?" "He plays on the fiddle." "Well, 1
does the old man play ?" "You bet he does
He plays the stavinist game of draw-poker
on Galveston island."
The Far West and the moon.
Mr. Richard A. Proctor, the astronomer,
writes: "During my recent journeys across
the Western states (from Kansas City through
Denver, Cheyenne, Ogden and San Francisco I
and back to Cheyenne and Omaha, through
St. Joseph to Kansas City) I was much struck
by the singular resemblance between the
configuration of the North American conti- 1
nent and that of the moon's surface as seen I
with good telescopes. The journey from
Missouri to the Rocky Mountains is usually
considered monotonous (so, indeed, that one i
station near the western border of Kansas
has received the suggestive name Monotony.)
But I found those widespread plains (not
strictly level, but slightly undulating) covered
with prairie grass, as impressive in their way
as the Rocky Mountains themselves. (The
undulations, let me note, resemble those of a
sea crossed by two or more series of wide and
gentle undulations.) The rise from Kansas I
City to Sherman, 8,234 feet above the sea
level, is so gradual as to be almost impercep
tible, except near Sherman, and the aspect
of the country changes much less than one
would expect. The chief change in the
character of the more level parts arises from.
the difference in the character of the vegeta
tion, the prairie grass being replaced at a
higher level by buffalo grass, and that in its
turn at a higher level by sage brush. These
broad, undulating regions, gradually slanting
upwardgto the foot of the Rocky Mountains,
strikingly resemble the great so-called 'seas'
on the moon, bordered by ranges of moun
tains, beyond which lie the regions of great
volcanic craters. These lunar seas, with their
prevalent dark tints, are among the most
stiking features of the moon's surface, and,
rightly apprehended, indicate a former con
dition of things on the moon resembling that
now prevailing on the earth. They show
that the moon, though now arid, had once
seas such as our earth has at present. The
slow processes of change by which the lunar
seas were turned to dry land are taking place
now, though on a larger scale (but even more
slowly,) on the earth. The lunar surface
much more nearly resembles that of the New
World than that of Europe, Asia, Africa, or
Australia."
I The Money of the Caliph.
If any one doubts that the good Caliph was
T a reality let him go to the British Museum,
or look in the window of a curiosity shop in
Oxford street, and he will see plenty of silver
coins bearing, not, indeed, the image, but
certainly the superscription of the good
Haroun Alrashid. It is true that the coins
Fbeing Arabic the force of their evidence will
not be immediately apparent to the casual
Sobserver, but a translation of the iniscriptions
- will inform him that besides bearing the f a
mous Moslem dogma, "There is no god but
I God; He is one; He has no equal," and the
1 statement that "In the name of God this
- place of silver was struck at such and such
I a town in ~such and such a year," the coin
- presents the "prophetic mission, "Moham
med is the Apostle of God," and underneath
a it the name of the Caliph Alrashid, and
s sometimes that of Jaafer the Barmecide as
, well. Some of these coins, 'which are as
e much Haroun's as our shilling of to-day is
v Queen Victoria's may have been once in the
Cfaliph's own hand, and, 'who knows ? may
a have passed through the slim henna-dyed
a fingers of the fair Portress.
* Too Costly.
5 -
r A Western helress a year or two ago
bought a husband bearing one of the most
ancient titles in the Italian aristocracy. The
tusual marriage settlemnentegave the Lord com
mand of a large income in his own right, be
sides which the Italian law makes the hus
band master of the wife's property. - The
Vhard-headed father objected to the cold
blooded bargain and sale style, but the daugh
ter insisted. The terms were finally drawn
up. To the husband $100,000 down to put
'~his estates in order; 20,000 per annum as ant
allowance; $)20,000 for each child born, the
dfather to be sole trustee of the money. In
Sless than .a year 3the pair were embroiled.
The wife was beaten by her Lord, and finally
n put in a convent .under plea that she was
I, mrad. 'or a time the father was in ignorance
it of the real state of affairs, as no letters could
Y pass from the incartcerated womanh that were
Le not first submitted to the husband. The case
twas brought before the American Consul and
the father has begun proceedings to rescue
i-his daughter.,
t N~. Y. Graphic.l
ad ~The deatlh of IPierwe Ntapoleon is at this
t hiie of nop particular momiient. The fortunes
of his houase are at a 10* ebb. ~During the
orera of its prosperity he was an obstacle in
Iheaway pt ites .dvancement., The slayer of
Vc~or &oit wasu jperson whoQ is dangerous
to the cause he espoused, and one of the
Sgaes burdens of the Second 2Pmipire was to
~ ~3~rhis acts. After the fall
ce ofth empkr, ~and shortly iifter Prince Je
1 roxne JBonaparte came to London, and bought
ad'.inred such of the articles which the Comn
wit ~his wife, who was an honest, good nat
rifty ndskilled dressZ)aker and mil
S1nr woman of the people. She opened
'7" ¶dI dresSfnd e shop ina Old
Bond street, one of the most fashionable
shopping streets of the West end; placed the
Imperial arms over the door, and hung out
her sign, "S. Altesse Mme. la Princesses
Pierre Napolecn." Now Jerome, who was
the nephew of one great Emperor who was
dead, the cousin of another great Emperor
who was in captivity, the son-in-law of the
King of Italy, and the brother-in-law of the
King of Spain, was besides all this something
of a snob. It irritated him to the quick to
see a member of his family thus re
duced to the level of a tradesman; and be
took steps to buy out and send away his rela
tives. But when the agent to whom he had
entrusted the negotiations called upon the
Princess, that estimable lady told him that
she was already doing a large and profitable
business, that orders were pouring in upon
her, that her husband was an expensive lux
ury and that she was resolved to provide for
him all the money he needed, and that, in
short, she would not gratify Jerome by sell
ing for a mere song. He would have to come
down on the nail very handsomely if any
thing was done. Jerome is rich, but he is
also very penurious, and hates terribly to
part with his money. But his pride in this
case was stronger than his penuriousness, and
the affair ended by his paying over a suffi
cient sum to induce Mme. la Princess to dis
pose of her establishment and to retire
to Belgium, where she and her expen
sive husband remained until they were per
mitted to return to Paris.
Cosmopolitan Hotel!
NEW HOUSE,
NEW FURNITURE,
Everyllling Clean, Now and Attractive
Mrs. Beckman, having moved into her new house, is
now fully prepared to receive transient or
regular boarders.
Will Make a Specialty
of always having clean, sweet beds, and rooms large
and well ventilated.
FRANKLIN STREET,
Between Baker and Power St.,
*"T. BENTON.
R. W. CUX INGS,
Fort Benton, Montana
CONTRACTOR FOR
EXCAVATIONS,
BUILDING STONE FURNISHED.
WIIOOP-UiP SALOON
And Restaurant,
W, H, FLYNN, Proprietor.
Board, 95.O0 Per Week.
Meals at All Hours. Oysters in Season. Fine Wines,
Liquors and Cigars.
SUN RIVER COossING 19l, T.
C. ID. S TOR ER,
Brie kmaker
-AND
CON TR ACTOR.
Will Contract for the Erection of
Brick or Frame Buildings1
YARID BACK OF THE BUTTE,
FORT JIENTON, MONTANA.
BRICK ALWAYS ON HAND, AT REA
SONABLE PRICES.
C. M. L ANNING,
-DEALER IN
Watches, Cloc ks, Jewlry
ST. JOIIZy STREET',
Fort Benton, Montana.
IGeneral Repairer of Watches, Clocks, Guns, Pistols,
Sewing Machines, Etc. All kinds of work done
in a workmanlike manner.
ORDERS BY MAU,. P'ROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
N. H. W.EBSTE R,
---Wholesale and 14etail deale in---
Tobacoos and. Gigars,
a SNUFF, PIIPM, SEOKERS' AU1EWIA
0 onifectionery,
Ammunition.
Main t., opp, First Nat. Baitk,
HELE~N&, - . . * 191OI)TAWAh
'j Fine Out Qihewing aud Yenityj Fair
14 BmokinnTobaccos.
1881 1h81.
OPENING OF NAVIGATION.
WILL RUN FOUR OF THE
Finest and Fastest Boats on the River
DURING THE SEASON,
CARRYING UNITED STATES MAIL,
And American, North Pacific and Benton Line Express
-TO
FORT BENTON,
Leaving Bismarok Every Saturday Evening During Navigation,
0
Steamner Benton,
Leaves St. Louis, Saturday, March 26th.
0
Steamer Helena,
Leaves Yankton, Saturday, April. 2d.
0
Steamer Butte,
Leaves Yankton, Saturday, April 9th.
0o--
Steamer Black Hills,
Leaves Sioux City, Saturday, April 16th.
0
For Rates of Freight or Passage, apply to
T. C. POWER & BRO., Fort Benton, N. T.
T. C. POWER & CO., Helena, N. T.
A. M. HANNAF6RD, N. P. R. R., St. Paul, Minn.
JOHN H. CHARLES, Sioux City, Iowa.
I, P. BAKER, No. 308 North Commercial Street, St. Louis
Order all Express from the East via ARERICAN AND NORTHERN PACIFIC.
Mark all goods Benton 'P1 Line' Care N. P.R1. R.
JN0. T. IIIlRPILY SAMUEL NEEL. W. W. IllW~Ils. W~i. II. TODD
MIURPH Y, NEEL & CO .
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Groceries, Wines and Liquors,
CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
Cooking and Heating Stoves, Sheep Tobacco, Woos Sackcs and Wool Twine, Tents and Wagon
Cover8, Stockcmen's, Miners', Freighters' and Farmers' Sutipples.
DR Y GOODS.
Boots, Shoes, fiats, Caps, Queens
*ware and Furniture.
We keep large and complete lines of all the above mentioned goods, and all kinds of House
Furnishing Goods, and Farmers, Freighters, Miners and Families will do well to
call and examine our goods and get our latest prices before laying in their
supplies. Do a general Storage and Commisssion business.
Consignments solicited, and goods forwarded
promptly.
* SCHUTTLER lWAbONS,
~'Cortland Platformt Spring Wagons and Buggies,
PORTER IRON ROOFINC.
ST'OR AGE AND COMMISSION,
011j Fire-Proof 8toreIS Varehoilse in Fort Benton,
Robes, Skias andl Furs Bought and Sold.
Lr ~IURHY, NEEL & CO.
Cor. Front and Benton StrtS F ORT BENTON, N. T.

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