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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, October 26, 1881, Image 6

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GOSSIP FOR THE GIRLS.
The moon comes up across the mountain's rim,
And all the earth is glad as glad can be,
And father's waiting for my love and me
My love and I are waiting, too, for him.
He waits for us where lurk the shadows dim;
On the veranda where the tangles are
Of leafage; and we note his third cigar,
Secure, ourselves, from sight upon the limb
Of the scrub oak that mantles us in shade
Impervious to mortal eye. 0 bliss!
To know the grim old watcher's starboard boot,
Fresh from its maker's hand, and badly made,
Presses his bunion with a painful kiss,
The while he brandisheth his warlike foot!
... . - N4 4Il - --- .....
A Wineteenth Century Romance
They sat alone in a deeply shaded recess
of the bay window, Vio let Caryll and Adel
bert Jones, while just beyond them through
the flimsy lace curtains of marvelous texture
and priceless worth could be seen the formE
of the merry dancers as they swept languidly
by in the sensuous measures of the Waltz ;:
fair young faces laid trustfully against
shoulder-blades, and beautiful forms encir
cled by strong, manly arms tiat would glad
ly~have held them from the storms that life,
however fair it seems, must bring to all,
Nearly a twelvemonths ago these two, sit
ing in the window, had plighted their troth.
Violet Caryll was the only daughter of a
purse-proud millionaire, and accustomed to
every luxury that money could purchase,
while Adelbert Jones was only a poor book
keeper, with no chance to steal anything and
get ahead in the world. He had come to the
soiree dansante given by Violet's father to
honor her nineteenth birthday, and had wan
dered with her to the bay window,, where,
secure from observation, they might talk of
the all-absorbing passion that bound their
hearts together in the silken fetters of love.
"I have been thinking of you, darling, all
the day," said Violet in a low, sweet voice,
the very modulation of which told better
than words how her whole being was wrap
ped up in the love she bore the strong-limbed
young man whose eyes looked into hers with
such a tender expression. "I have not been
here at all, but away, away-I hardly know
where. Only in the land my footsteps have
lingered in all day, I never cried for love
that did not come, nor felt hungered for
love's own gifts, nor felt lonely, nor desolate
nor afraid. Because, because beneath the
turquoise skies of my mystical dreamland,
in therose-laden air, love was always with
me; love with strong arms and clinging
kisses and deathless tcnderness. And I
krew no loneliness, nor sorrow, nor heart
break.,'
"But you do not doubt my love, sweet
heart ?" he murmnured, bending over her
withloverlikie trnL:rness and kissing softly
the wine-red lips that overhung the sensitive,
drooping mouth."'
"No," she said, looking at him with
proud, love-lit eyes, while a winsome smile
lent additional beauty to the fair face. '"I
do not doubt you for an instant, only when I
am lonely and sad, and then I think that
some-one more beautiful than I may win you
from me. I know I am not beautiful, Adel
bert, and in my jealous moments it comes to
me with a great throb-the power of beauty
ever nan. Soft, pearly flesh, rounded
carves, sweet red lips, velvety eyes-all the
magic.and marvel of tint and texture of out
ine--whea I think of this, I say, I am in
Sftterdespair"-and the proud girl crushed
with cruel f.rce, betwee nher white,tapering
ingers, a flower pot that stood with others
on the window. The noise attracted the at
bention of her father, who was passing by
and he pushed aside the curtains and entered
"How much will a new window cost ?"
said old Mr. Caryll to his agent next morn
ing.
"Did he take the sash with him ?"
"Yes."
"About $15."
Two years later Violet Oaryll married a
man who owned two steam barges and a tug.
*But her heart was desolate and her young
lore blighted.
Too Awfually Utter.
[Detroit Free Press.]
"Well," said a .eadwood man who had
just been introduced to a Brooklyn girl, and
who had been asked by her if they had many
of those lovely frontiersmen out his way
"well, mum, we have right smart of 'em in
our neck o' the woods."
"And do they wear fringed legs and hunt
those dear, sweet buffalo ?"' asked the girl,
"The stage drivers wear fringe and sech,
and when a buffaler shines out some one is
pooty likely to hook on."
"How shpreme ! And those gorgeous In
dians in their picturesque wigwams of wam
pum,:with thelr blending combinations of
war paint, do you often see them ?"
"Oh, once and a while we get a hack at a
buck, but mostly they are on the reserva
tion," replied the Deadwood m:an, staring
"They does come in occasionaily, but we
don't track with them."
"The sweet things! And you have such
sunsets out in your mbuntain fastessee, and-.
:such loves of highwaymen! Do you ever
see those delightful highwaymenr"
"No : t often, mum.I~ :The get :in the brush,.
SY, mum," stammered ithe Deadwood:ii
Sin, ometimes its pretty dern too, least
wise it was the day Cobbler Duffy came
down on the landslide."
"An avalanche ! Do you mean an aval
anche ! Oh, can there be anything more
crystally utter than an avalanche !"
"It was pooty tooty utter," hazarded the
Deadwood man, dropping into his compan
ion's style of expression. The cobbler had
a-a-a crystally.shaft up the side of a butte
and one day he was-was toeing around up
there, and things slipped out from under
him."
"Oh, how radient ! How iridescent !"
"Yes, mum, and he began to radiate to
wards town at the rate 1000 miles and three
furlongs a minit. We seen him a-a utter
ing down the side of the moumnOin, ripping
up trees and rocks aln: . ri alpng, and his
iridescent wife fispped out of her shack and
begin to raise a row."
"Poor Lilly," moaned the girl, "did she
stop the glorious avalanche ?"
"No, nmum, not quite. Duffy fetched up
againstbhis shack all standing and begin to
howl like a blizzard, cause he thought he
had lost his mine. But when they had tip
ped the land slide one side they found the
mine underneath just as they had left it. So
he could work it right under his winder.
That was pooty considerable too, eh ?" and.
the Deadwood man never winked.
"How sublime !.--How crystalhne !"
"But I was going to say we sever had a
sunset since.",
"So star like." murmured the girl.
"Yes, mestly star like. You see the land
slide stands there to this day. on end, and
they don't dare to turn it ,ov.er for fear of
filling in the town, so we don't get any sun
after 11 in the morning.
"A perenial twilight ! So fearfully, terri
bly, awfully utter."
"Yes," murmured the Deadwood man,
"It's just about as utter as you get 'em."
And she sat and gazed upon him, wrapped
in admiration, while he fell into a reverie
and wondered at Brooklyn hospitality in not
providing "sand boxes" for strangers.
G'e~ip for the Girls.
"Why is a Zulu belle like a prophet of
of old ?" Because she has not much on'er
in her own country.
"What were the worst results of the civil
war ?" cried the orator. "Widows !" shout
ed Jones, who had married one.
The true way for a woman to drive a nail
is to aim the blow Eqvuare at her thumb. She
would then avoid hitting her thumb, any
way.
"Can there be happiness where there is no
love ?" solemnly queries an author in a book
on marriage. Not much happinss, perhaps,
but if the girli is awfully rich there can be
lots of fan.
Said he: "And you l.ve me better than
all the world lI i' s i'. ".Y &< "V *i s
tkink any more t - me ., I Io. I; $rr t .: .
lion dollarn ? .u. . " ..n ...i . .
rich you wou a't a to I mry me
more tha n you do nw ? ' N.e, 1i
were Uimply coutlin, ti %ai ail.
A Bradford, Pa., girl a1t !he r cahore was
the innocent c'nse of a :'ens;·aion, The fair
d:ames:l appeared on ihe plwzzi of a leading
hotel in a breezy muslin dress. Her tooties
wvootsies were incased in low slippers. Fol
lowing an absurd fashion she wore on one
leg a black silk stocking and on the other a
fiery red. A Bradford man, alse at the same
resort, sat a few feet away. Looking at the
lady and her pretty hose, he remarked in a
voice audible all over the piazza : "Bet $5
on the red."
Young Spurgeen was expected to die with
in twenty-four hours at Crest!ine, 0., and
under the circumstances Miss Grey consent
ed to marry him, althouh she had never re
ciprocated his affection, and had chbewRn
another man to bgecome her husnband. Her
amiability go.t her.into a dilemnme.; for
Spurgeon has recoves ed an~d wih to hold
her to the compact. To i hat she iii! n-tl
agree, andl she begs him to get na dipv~..e, so;
tha.t .he may marry his favored rival. In
this unsatisfactory condition the matlter
rests.
Miss Mamie Richards, living with her
father, R. . Richards, of the town of Anti
go, in Langlade county, Wisconsin, i. about
as plucky a young lady as there is to be
found in the State. The past summer she
has taught school in the big woods, walking
fire miles to her charge every. morning
through the dense forest where there is but a
trail, and where it is nearly dark in broad
daylight, and five back at home at night, ma
king tea miles a day. Two or three times
she has seen Wolves about her path, and
once was followed nearly a quarter, of a
mile by a large one, since which time she
has gone armed with a revolver, but she kept
right along-with her business and established
r her school. The young lady is only about
Sseventeen years of age.
The summer hat is off the cops,
No wren around the door-step hops,
The farmer's yanking in his crops,
The basetball player's playing stops, ]
The buckwheat cake our vision tops,
The clerk on wearlng dusters drops,
And joy our rosy fancy props
With dreamsi of sausage and porcine chops.
Geo. P. Reeves & Co.
iWatchmakers; lewel 's
Manufacturers of All Descriptions
of Jewelry,
Aatd imp rters eof Pine Jewelry. Dlie~'
mends, SITver Ware, Watches
-4tLENA, MONTAMA.
kA Four Ounce Silver StemWinding
7w Watch for $18.
FRANK'S .
NEWS DEPOT,
Tobacco and Cigars,
CONFECTIONERY,
NUTS, CANDIES,
Fruits of all Descriptions.
CUTLERY, PLAYING CARDS
Perfumery and Fancy Soaps.
Full Line of Smokers' Articles, Seaside Libraries,
Novels of all descriptions, and all the
Illustrated Papers.
PALACE PARLORS
Front Street, Fort Benton.
--: TIIE
Finest Tonsorial Parlors
IN THE NORTRWEST.
SITI & SPALDI ,
ProprietOre. .
Messrs. Smith & Spalding respectfully inform the
citizens of Benton that they have recently bought out
Mr. Wm. Foster, and assure the public a continuatiou
of the uniform skill and courteous attention which
is familiar to the habitues of the place.
"EAGLE BIRD SALON"
And Restaurant.
,IMAIN STREET,
BENTON - - MONTANA.
This popular resort is always found stocked with the
choicest goods, purchased in the East and ship
ped expressly for this house, comprising
the very finest brands of
WINES,
B BRANDIES,
Milwaukee Bottled Beer,
And the fiest brands of
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC
CIGARS.
The Bar is the finest in Benton, and you can always .
get any kind of fancy drink you call for, mixed
m first-class style and with the choicest
- , and best variety of liquors.
WM. FOSTER,
PROPRIETOR.
MIAX KABAKER,
Dealer in
TOBACCOS, CIQARS,
Stationery,
Sflll rareertment of pallcas of pa=
peru, aevels and Fi o a2 hf. ta
description al-waya
on hunssid
CONFECTIONERY, NUTS% , CANDIES
FRUIITS, NOTIONS, ETC.
ICE-COLD LEMIONADE
New on hand.
FRONT ST., FiOR6fT DENTON.
W. C. JONES,
Carpenter and Joiner
GENERAL JOBBER.
Saws Filed and Furniture Repaired,
SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS TO ORDER.
All orders promptly filled. Shop on Franklin Street,
above T. E. Collins' residence.
FT. BENTON, - -. IMONTANA.
FRED L. KING,
House, Sitn antd Ornamental Painter,
1)rders for work of all kinds promptly executed at
lowest ratea.
Orders by Mail will receive Prompt
attention.
Every kind and size of Glazed Sash lept for sale
Rates givenon application.
SHOP ON LOWER IMAIN STREET,
Helena, M. T.
RIVER BLACKSMITH SHOP
Cor. Power and Franklin Streets,
FT. BENTON, 1RIONTANA.
Horse, Mule& OxShoeing
A SPECIALTY.
WAGON- REPAIRINO.
Ihave employed the best wood worknen in the Terri
tory, and can guarantee good work and entire
satisfaction.
iRUFUIS PAYNE, Proprietor.
MANN'S .RAN.H,
The cosiest, most comfortable and bestl stopping
place on the Barker road.- Splendid accommodations,
good rooms,, well stocked bar an every attention.
given to ' .
Transient Stock.
make it apaint to reach thids picturesque d attract
ive place. The Hease mso situated as to make It sa
567 i ·8iai-ii··~i
I. G. BAKER, St. Louis, Mo. W. G. CONRAD, FoxTBENToM.
C. E. CONRAD, FORT MACLEOD.
I. G. BAKER & CO.
FORT BENTON, M. T.
BANKERS, FREIGHTERS, INDIAN TRADERS
STEAMBOAT OWNERS.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
We are in receipt of a Larger Stock of Assorted Merchan
dise- than any other House in Montana, and offer
Special Inducements to Cash Buyers.
WILL PAY THE HIGHEST RATES FOR ROBES AND FURS
PROPRIETORS OF
BAKER & CO.'S BONDED LINE,
FROM EASTERN CANADA TO THE N. W. TERRITORY.
Will Contract Freight from all Eastern Cities in Canada and the United
States to all points in Montana and the Northwest,
WILL INSURI 0OOD8 via MISSOURI RIVER.
Eastern Offloe, o., 219 Olive t,, St. Louis, Mo.
1881. ESTABLISHED 1876
L. H. ROSENCRANS,
-: MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN:
SADDLERY HARDWARE.
mBack Sna!e Whilp, Hobbles, ]
Dalioria Lashes, Halters,
ury co~iss, R litding Bridles,
Tron IHoud st r ups Hrnfess SeapT
P~aiaied Brktlge iReins, Feed Japags,
p.cket 3wivels, , IWhip Stalksn,
wlvies aid Iiittens, Tents, I
Iarness Ouil, Cdinches,
kll, Lea & Co.'s , Gloves and Ilittl.
Cor. Front and Bond Sts., - Fort Benton, Montana.
KLEINSCHMIDT & BRO.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
G erries,. Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobaceo,
Shelf .ardoare, Sheep Tobacco, Wootl acks and Twine, Tents and Wagon Cooers
Stockmen's, Miners, Freighers' ancd Farmers' pl..sa,
Clothing, Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes
Hats, Caps and Furniture.
We keep constantly on hand large and complete lines of the above named goods, and
carry all kinds of Furnishihg Goods for the Farmer, Freighter and Miner.
Families will do well to call and examine our goods and obtain
our prices before purchasing elsewhere. We also
do a General Storage and Commission
business. Consignments
solicited and,
shipped. I
We Pay the- fig est Market Rates for
ROBES, BEEF HIDES AID PELTRIES.
We contro1 six of the Largest Mercantile Houses in thle Territory, and our shipments
are so extensive that we can give buyers far befter rates on all classes of
merchandise that any other firm in Montana. Especial aitention..
is given to the Wholesale and 4obbing trade, and a
S brief inspection: of our enormous
Fm t.
Front rtreet, Fort Benton, Montana,
*1j~

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