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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, February 01, 1882, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053157/1882-02-01/ed-1/seq-7/

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GUITEAU GUILTY I!
The Jury Come to This Conclusion in Six
Minutes.
Closing Scenes of the Great Trial-The Con
clusion of Judge Porter's Scathing
Address.
WrASHINGTON, January 25.-As usual,
Guiteau oppened the proceedings of the
Court by announcing : "My sister has been
doing some silly talk at Chicago. She means
well, but she is no lawyer."
Judge Porter immediately resumed his ar
gument. Admonished by the falling snow
and the severity of the weather, from which
he had suffered, and from which doubtless
the Jury had also suffered, he felt it neces
sary to vary from his original intention, and
to trust to the intelligence and honor of the
jury to supply his defence. He would not,
therefor, linger over the dry details of evi
dence, feeling it imperatively necessary that
the case should be brought to a conclusion as
soon as possible. He would simply touch
upon a few of the salient points of the evi
dence.
"John W. Guiteau," said Porter, "I be
lieve to be an honorable man. He came here
ready to contribute his means,. his evidence
and his services to save his brother's life,
and he is an honor to his father's name, and
yet the truth comes from his lips and must
impress upon every one of you the convict
ion that on the second day of July this pris
oner was as sane as you or I, or the Judge
upon this bench."
Reading from the evidence of John W.
Guiteau, and commenting upon it, JtPldge
Po;rtei sNid : "Ile has two races."
Cuitusn-How many have you got, Judge
Porter ?
Judge Porter-He has two faces; the one
showing the sancity of a Parsee, and the
other the hideous grin of the fiend that pos
sesses him.
As he continued to read from the evidence
of John W. Guiteau's testimony relative to
his last interview with the prisoner. Guiteau
continued interupting with such comments
as "What I say is always true,. Judge Por
ter ;" "What you say is generally false. "
"I never said so," and "That is absolutely
false."
Proceeding, Judge Porter contrasted the
life, conduct and deceitful practice of the
prisoner with the Apostle Paul, in the light
of the prisoner's assumption that he, like
Paul, was honestly engaged in doing the
Lord's work. "Paul never palmed off brass
watches for gold."
."Neither did I," shouted Guiteau.
Judge Porter-Paul never swindled his
creditors out of their just dues.
"Oh, your a blood man," retaliated the
prisoner; "you belong to the Judads tribe."
The picture drawn by Judge Porter was
anything but a lovely one, and provoked the
prisoner to the most abusive retorts, as "You
are a liar and you know it, and I tell you so
to your face, Judge Porter."
"This man," said Judge Porter, "who pro
claims that he never deceived any persons !"
"That's a fact," piped the prisoner, "put
that in frequently."
Judge Perter-This man who says he nev
er deceived any one, said in one of his hand
bills, "Lecture by the Honorable Charles
Guiteau !" He never deceived any one!
Where did he get this title of "honorable ?"
Guiteau-That's the way my letters come
addresed, sir.
"This is the Little Giant 'of the West,"
continued Judge Porter, "the Lord murdered
Garfield ?"
Guiteau-Yes, and he'll murder you before
long.
Judge Porter-The Lord defrauded the
printers and the boarding houses, and every
night and morning the Christian prisoner
thanks the Lord for His work !
Guiteau continued desperately shouting
"Your a liar and you know it; you • haven't
brains enough to tell a saint from a devil!
A saint from heaven couldn't stand the abuse
from that man Porter, and I won't stand it.
He's a liar, and I call him so !"
Porter said he was simply'reading from the
sworn testimony of Guiteau's brother.
Guiteau-He's no brother of mine; I want
that understood. My sister sympathizes
with me.
The first interruption from counsel came
when Reed strenuously objected to Porter's
quoting from English authorities.
Judge Cox said there was no cause for ob
jection. Though It was not very relevant,
it was not objectionable,
Guiteau's remarks about the Jews called
from Porter a remark that he had yet to
know that a man need be ashamed to spring
from the same race as the Savior.
The clamor and din made by Guiteau, re
inforced from counsel, resembled a small
babel.
Scoville finally objected to Porter's coi
struction of the evidence, and the prisoner
insisted that Porter should be arrested for in
solence. The bailiffs trying to quiet the se
sassin, only drew from him the most vicious
demonstrations, and nearly obliged the ofi
cers to administer wholesome discipline.
Porter then reiqwed Dcr. tiSpIt~a' te.-iL
mony, and was called 4a bisrbli,; diy,
lying whelp, at litervals by\the prisoiOr.
At Porter's eloquent and stirring esatenCes
Guitoau waa roused qslost to fry pna
lowed like a bedast.
Porter referred to Reed's dimovhry t
Charlotte OCr4.P r Isu 1 n.n @m d ",4f.
was a great contrast to this vndlctive, cow
i~~r:;. ~ ~ R )''er~ag~~s,4T
ardly wretch. She was not afraid to die.
"I ain't either," shouted Guiteau, "you
may put my body in the ground if you can,
but I tell you this nation will go down in
blood if you harm a hair of my head !"
"Wilkes Booth was almost a patriot com
pared with this cowardly assassin. Wilkes
Booth was a man of manhood and kindness;
but this cowardly wretch could plan for his I
own safety at the same time. He murdered 1
for revenge and notoriety."
j, Guiteau-I shot my man in broad daylight,
and don't you forget it.
For the next half hour there was a contin
uous stream of interruptions and abuse from
the prisoner and a score of times he de
nounced Porter as a liar, with various ad.
jectives. Never before had his vindictive
ness been so plain and his cunning merged
into angry spite. He unwittingly empha
sized Porter's sketch of himself.
Judge Porter will conclude to-day and the
jury may get the case to-night.
(Guiteau after recess tried to talk but was
stopped by Judge Cox.
Porter said Judas Iscariot could not have
pronounced a more sinister judgment than
G(itead in his criticism on the religious and
moral growth of the past 900 years.
Guiteau--"Judas would have employed
you as his attorney, you big liar, you!"
Porter depicted the ridiculous absurdity
of Guiteau's claim of transitory mania,
which left him, as soon as his victim sank
to the ground, a perfectly sane man.
At 4 o'clock Judge Porter concluded his
argument and Judge Cox charged the jury.
At 5:35 the court was called to order and
at 5:36 the jury came in and rendered a ver
dict of guilty as indicted. The jury was out
six minutes.
Jinm Bowle and the "Memphis 'error."
On one occasion Bowie, whose reputation
had reached Memphis, arrived by boat at
that city, or rather what was then known&s
the Third Chickasaw Bluffs. The bank
from the boat landing to the top was about
150 feet high, and a large number of people
were watching the arrival of the strangers.
Looking down, one of them recognized
Bowie as he stepped over the gang-plank,
and made the remark: "There comes Jim
Bowie."
"What!" shouted a big flatboatman, then
known as the "Memphis Terror," as he
looked down the bluff; "what! Jim Bowie ?
That's the fellow I've been looking for for
months. Jim Bowie ! Why, - - him, I'll
whip him so quick he won't know what hurt
him. I'll whip him if I never whip another
man in my life. Stand by, boys, and see the
fun !"
Bowie came slowly up the pank. In his
hand he carried an old umbrella. He had no
pistols, and was evidently not expecting or
in fact prepared for a fight. This fact did
Snot escape the now thoroughly interested
spectators. Up went the flatboatman promp '
Sly, as Bowie reached the top of the bluff.
Is your name Jim Bowie ?" he asked.
Bowie replied that it was.
"Then," shouted the flatboatman, as he
t squared off, "I think you a - rascal, and
I'm going to whip you right here and now."
Bowie was a man of few words. He stood
Sand gazed at his adversary, who was more
emboldened than ever. "I think you're a
- coward," he yelled, and I'm going to
Sknock your head off," and, so saying, the
"Memphis Terror" advanced to the conflict.
Bower never flinched. His keen eye was
, fixed on the "Terror," who at this moment
d was face to face with him. But as the man
of Memphis drew a dirk from his breast
Bowie stepped back a foot and thrust out
his umbrella as if to keep his antagonist at
bay.
The "Memphis Terror," seizing the um
brella with one hand, made a pass at the in
ventor of the famous knife with the other.
In so doing he pulled the umbrella to himself
t leaving free in the right hand of Bowie his
murderous weapon, which to this moment
had been'concealed in the folds of the im
promptu sheath. The sight of Bowie stand
ing there with the knife in his hand and the
gleam of vengeance mn his eye was too much
for the "Terror."
t From the bouncing bully he became
Stransformed into a craved coward in a sec
ond. His face turned pale and his knees
Strembled, while the dirk dropped from his
hands as he gazed on Bowie's weapon with
staring eyes. "Put it up; put away that
scythe, for God's sake, Bowie. I was mis
taken in my man."
Bowie advanced a step.
"Don't-don't kill me!" beseeched the
Bully; for God's asake, nan, don't go for me
with that scythe, and I swear to you I'll
S -never attick another man as long as I live."
iowie looked at his now thorougly de
moralized opponent for a moment, and then,
turning on his heel with the expression,
"Coward," walked rapidly away. Thence
forth thie ',Mmephis Terror" wasa changed
man, and uni theday of his death he never
lost the seblrriqet ofq '".Pt.up.hat-scythe."
S Weala~ ron am Newspapers.
Many years ago, in one of the severe win
S; whe ~t.ph among
Sb" pooot that o taold
ztn~wepR.I9e *;r.lred over the JFo4,, ·wouald
sI frOm- sa sI..batetlle. ! alte or bk1ahkets and
- iovrl. hi brouhtunpothq iVur-ala
pe.tbut it brought eomfort to manj' a
weight, and do not consider that there is no
warmth in the coverings themselves, but
that they merely prevelt the heat of the body
from passing off. Whatever is a poor con
ductor of heat will make a good warm cov
ering. Paper itself is a poor conductor, but
still poorer are the thin layers of air that are
confined'when two or three newspapers are
laid upon one another. A few newspapers
laid over the bed will keep one much Warmer
than some of the heavy, close woven blank
ets. We do not propose newspapers as a
substitute for blankets and comforters, but it
is one of those make shifts that it is well to
know. In travelling one may, by the aid of
a few papers, secure a comfortable rest in a
thinly clad bed, and it we cannot afford to
give a destitute family a blanket or a. com
forter, we can bhow them how to increase
the usefulness of their thin covering by stitch
ing a few layers of newspapers between
them.
A City Unearthed.
The discovery of a deserted city sixty
miles long, cut out of the rocky face of a
winding cliff, rewarded the efforts of a Stev- -
enson Smithsonian institute exploring party -
during the researches in New Mexico and
Arizona the past season. This is by far the
most important find yet made among the
ancient cliff-dwellers. Some of' the houses
contain four or five dwellings, one upon
other, and in the plateau above the cliff were
found many ruins of temples of worship,
built of well-cut, square stones. A compari
son of the collections of pottery and imple
ments gathered in the cliff houses by the ex
.ploring party with those obtained in the Pue
blo villages strengthens the belief that the
Pieblo :Indians are the degenerate descen
dants of the once powerful race that built
the ruined cities of the plains, and then re
treating before some more warlike foe,
carved out these singular dwellings on the
sheer walls of dizzy precipices, and found
them, it may be for centuries, both fortresses
and homes.
Atchison's Trading Post
SIX MILES SOUTH OF FORT
MAGINNIS.
A complete stock of
General Merchandise,
INDIAN GOODS,
And Miners' Outfits.
Having removed my stock of merchandise from Ft.
Maginnis, and added a large and complete invoice of
new goods, I am prepared to supply settlers, miners,
and travelers with as good goods and at as low figures
as any store in this seetion of the conn,ry outside of
Fort Benton,
40 JNO. S. ATCHISON.
Choteau House
NEW HOTEL
Thoroughly Refitted and Newly Furnished,.
JERRY SULLIVAN,
Proprietor.
Conducted on first-class prnnciples. Everything new
neat and attractive. Feeling assured that we can
offer the very best of accommodation, we res
Spectfully solicit the patronage of the
public. .
PRICES REANONABLE.
THE LARGEST AND BEST HOTEL IN CHOTEAU
COUNTY.
PALACE PARLORS
Front Street, Fort Benton.
-: THE'
Finest Tonsorial Parlors
IN THE NORTRWEST.
SAIUEL SPALDIn,
* Proprietor.
CENTENNIAL HOTEL
BENTON, MONTANA.
R. 8. CULBERTSON,
PROPRIETOR.
I1EW AND COIFO1TABLE RO0D IS
With or without fire. The house hso been recently
enlarged and new sleeping rooms added. Board
by the day or weelk. Special rstos given
Regular Boarders.
Passengers en Coacbes wishtsng to. Step
at thi Huease will please Iaferm
the drivers.
F. J. GAUGLER,
Deaier in.a line of
General 8Merchandise
MARTI1nSDALE. .* T,
I always have on hand b fullsupply of goods demand
ed by the trade, and uell tem ams reaaongble
prices.
A good hoteluider the m emagetutlit Of Mr. ar
meet .Mirs. Stieklds & Lund. andb co nplete
backir biOIR, w ei run in. -ounemction/with. ,the
ste'.O-. e tlmt 'iBrook" I . bfr bvrea
Wv.l
DAVIDSON & MOFFITT,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
HARNESS, SADDLES
Saddlery Hardware, Etc., Etc.
WOOL SACKS, TWINE, SHEEP SHEARS, TENTS, ETC.
-o
Agent for Hill's
CONCORD BUGGY AND TEAM HARNESS.
-0
Cash Paid for Hider "'zrs, Peltries, Wool, E d., Etc. Repairing
Neatly a,..c Promp ly Done.
1881. ESTABLISHED 1876
L. H. ROSENCRANS,
--:MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN:
SA DDLE, HARNESS,
SADDLERY HARDWARE.
BlackSnake Whips. Hobbles, I
California Lashes- Halters,
Curry Combs, Riding Bridles,:
Horse Brusbbhs, Side Saddles,
iMexican Spurs, Horse Biankets,j
Block Stirrups, Surcingles,:
Slipper Stirrups, Horse Collars,
Iroe B ua lid Stirrups Harness Soap,
Plaited Bridle Reins, . Feed Bags,
Picket swivels, Whip ntalks,
Glves and MIittens, Tents, 1
Harness Oil, Cinches,
Mills, Leak & Co.'s GloveesalMittols.
Cor. Front and Bond Sts., - Fort Benton, Montana.
SULLIVAN & GOSS,
Harness and Saddle
MANUFACTURERS,
Front Street, Benton. Mont.
Lt"We keep a full line of 8addlery Hardware, Collars, Whips, Blankets and Coronas.
Saddle-Trees of every descrintion, including the celebrated IRON FORK
and LIVE OAK TREES. Particular attention paid to the manu
facrure of
TEXAS, COLORADO, CHEYENNE AND IONTANA STYLE STOCK SADDLES,
Also all grades of Harness, from the Lightest to the Heaviest, suitable for Stock
men, Ranchmen, Freighters and others.
No Machine Stitched Work in our Stock I
Ladies' Saddles alwaye on h.nd. Highest Cash Price paid for Hides, Furs, Wool and
Peltries. Prompt atteniion paid to orders by mail and satisfaction guaranteed.
OVERLAND HOTEL
Front Street, Fort Benton.
This popular Hotel is situated in the centre of the town, convenient to the business houses;
and opposite the steamboat landing. A number of New Rooms have been recently
added, and nothing is left undone which will contribute to the comfort
and convenience of guests.
JOHN HUNSBERGER,
P KOPRIETOR.
ALL COACHES RUNNING INTO FORT BENTON ARRIVE AT'AND
DEPART FROM THIS UOTEL.
WRIGHT & EDWARDS
MINING COMPANY
OFFICE, FORT BENTON, MONTANA.
- 0
CAPITAL, $1,000,000. ' 500,000 SHARES.
Own the Wright & Edwards Mines and Mill Site Attached.
---
TRUSTEES:
JONBR W. POWER, H. L. WRIGflT, iOqEPE' 8. *tILLJ, T. 3o. CoLLINS
3. JJ. DoNHEILL.
JBs EPR;8 . U[ILXL, Proi+doent. J. J. DONINELLY, secreta;ry.
H& L.WRIGHIT, Vice.PrsldentL. T. E. COLLINS, Treaurert.
A. "imI8dmber loths i of liearary steek is oefed for al, at 50 cents per Ihbare

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