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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, March 29, 1882, Image 4

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THE RIVER PRESS 1
d
Wednesday, March 29, 1882. f
JERRY COLLINS. - - - . - - -- EDITOR
THE Southern floods begin to abate.t'
THE President has signed the anti-polyga
my bill. _
HBERY W. LONGFELLOW, the distinguished
poet, died on the 24th inst.
WHEN General Grant dines with the Pres- I
ident look out for some stalwart appoint- I
ments.
The Chinese bill passed the House on the
23rd by a vote of 77 to 65 without amend
ment. Now will the President sign it ?
SENATOR TELLER'S name was sent to the
Senate yesterday as Secretary of the Interior.
Ex-Governor Routt, it is thought, will suc
ceed to the seat in the Senate.
THE Chinese bill is in the hands of the
President. The friends of the bill are confi
dent that it will be signed although strong ef
forts are being made to secuire a veto.
Miss MAOKEY, the American millionaire
heiress is about to marry a Don somebody,
son of Count somebodyelse,. of Spain. She
m;trries for his title and he for her money.
WHILE Congress seems to favor a liberal
appropriation for the Missouri river Delegate
Maginnis should see to it that tlde upper di
vision of that stream secures its full share.
COMMODORE T. C. POWER takes in all the
government contracts on the river this year.
The Commodore is bard to set away with,
as the Democrats would find if he were nom
inated for De.legate.
SENATOR TELLER, it would seem, is to be
the next Secretary of the Interior. We be
lieve the appointment would be a good one.
However, it would be no trick at all to im
prove on Kirkwood.
THE Senate committee on the improvement
of the Mississippi river and its tributaries
have agreed upon a bill appropriating
$5,000,000 for the Mississippi and $1,000,000
for the Missouri river.
THE President has disapproved the finding
of the Court martial in the Whittaker case
and has ordered his dibmissal from arrest.
Let us hope the question as to who slit the
colored cadet's ears will not be opened again'
JUDGING by the following Washington
special of the 22nd to the Chicago Tribune
it would seem that Arthur is only a figure
head for Grant, who is the real President.
"Grant has been here barely twenty-four
hours and rumor has it that he is urging the
nomination of Beale instead ,f Chandler for
Secretary of the Navy, and that he effected
the postponement of the nomination of Tel
ler as Secretary of the Intr:or until meaF
ures can be taken to secure the appointment
of Chaffee to fill the vwcaney in the Senate:"
FAST MAILS FOR THE WEST.
The agitation of this subject by the peo
ple and press of the west is likely to bear
good fruit. The department has urged upon
Congress the necessity for an appropriation
for special transportation of mails on trunk
lines between the oceans with the view of
shortening the time between the East and the
West. The project is in a fair way to be
carried to copletion. The Postmaster
Generjd recently said: '"I have a hope,
if Congrees makes the appropriations pro
posed by the Senate for special facilities 'for
the transportation of mails on trunk lines,
that we may arrange a schedule which will
send mail from New York to the West or
S&n Francisco and get a return in three days
less than it takes now. It takes thirteen days
to do this at present. Now the mails are car
ried on railway trains and go when passen
gers go. This subjects the mails to slow
time and frequent delays.. The mails for the
West now lie in Chicago about four hours,
and in Omaha and Kansas City three hours
more. The railroad companies themselves
will havetto be consulted as to the method of
overcoming these delays-whether it is to be
done by chartering one fast train between
New York and Denver, or otherwise. My
theory is to lay the backbone for the estab
lishment of a fast mail service on the trunk
lines between the two oceans and then put on
attachments or improvements as faet as we
can." _
THE LAND LEAGUE.
We are glad to see that a branch of the
Land League has been organized in Benton
and that active measures are to be taken to
forward the cause here and assist as far as
possible in the good work going on.
On the part of many there appears to be a
mistaken idea as to the object and purpose of
the League. It is by no means a revolution
ary organization, and is as d1¢erent as day
from night from the Fenian movement of a
few years ago. Charles ttewart Parnell,
now incarcerated in prison because he had
the courage to call '~ins by their rtght:
names In revipwing Irelanud'is r s. is the
recognized originator and leard i tBhe prea
ent movement, the principal object of which'
is to bring about, by legal not rtevlat#c|ry
meaos, aland reformn t&tW ndsi tiat witdit
the tenant from the slekgh of poverty and
desatfrn which hrei new foandeto atisher
and better plane. It is direeted again Land
lordism and not against the British flg ; it
does not propose to liberate Ireland, only so
far as her people would be liberated by the
enactment of more just and liberal land laws
-a result that can only be attained by per
sistent agitation.
All great reforms are brought about in this
way. It isalways necessary to pave the way
by agitation-to create a public sentiment
favorable to the reform sought. If William
Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, John G.
Whittier, John Brown and others had not
persevered in the anti-slavery agitation our
land would yet probably be cursed with slav
ery. One purpose of the League, then, is to
keep up the land reform agitation, to create
a favorable public sentiment, and that in
time, with due perseverance, success will
crown its efforts there can be no doubt
whatever.
Another and more immediate object of the
League is to render pecuniary assistance to
those who are bearing the brunt of the fight.
Tenants are evicted by the thousand and
unless aid is furnished them they must sub
mit to the hard terms of landlords. The
opposition would be short lived indeed but
for the hearty co-operation of friends in the
United States and elsewhere. The money
contributed, we have good reason to believe,
is honestly appropriated to advance the cause
of the Irish tenantry against Landlordism,
with all the wrongs and grievances and infa
my the word carries with it in Ireland. Be
yond this the League does not go, and we
have great confidence that its just purpose
will in time be effected. The League in
Benton should, and doubtless will, do its full
share of the good work.
THE UPPER MISSOURI.
The House committee on the improvement
of rivers and harbors is diligently at work
on the appropriation bill and will, it is said,
be ready to report the bill to the House early
in April. Members of the committee are of
course reticent, as they should be, but one
of them has stated in general terms that lib
eral appropriations will be provided for the
Mississippi and Missouri rivers. This much
is at least encouraging, and it is to be hoped
that the "father of waters" will not absorb
nearly all of it, as has been the rtle hereto
fore. The rapid development of the New
Northwest has rendered the Missouri an im
portant stream for commercial purposes and
it is time that Congress should take cogni
zance of the fact, and by improving it add to
its usefulness.
The upper Missouri deserves more than
any other portion of the stream. It requires
immediate improvement to put it in a navigf.
ble condition, and no money could be voted
by Congress for the purpose of advancing
the commercial interests of the country that
would result more beneficially. A hundred
thousand dollars expenc'ed on the upper di
vision of the Missouri would render it easy
of navigation as far as Benton for six months
in the year, and would add wonderful im
petus to the development of the country
tributary to the upper river.
Our Delegate in Congress should Dot fail
to urge this fact before the House committee
on commerce and secure if possible a large
appropriation. Nothing that he can do will
so redound to the benefit of his constituents
and we hope to hear that he has not ever
looked the importance of this matter.
OHOTEAU'S FINANCES,
We publish to-day the annual report of
CountyClerk Tattan which is a detailed ex
hibit of the receipts and expenditures of the
county during the year ending March 1, 1882.
The showing is in many respects a most
gratifying one, and creditable to the officers
who conduct the business of the county.
The levy last year was but 16 mills on the
dollar and two terms of court were held in
stead of one, as heretofore, and still a de
crease in the indebtedness of the county (ex
clusive of building jail) of $6,931,46 is
shown. Including the cost of the jail-not
far from $12,000-the increase in the indebt
edness of the county during the year has
been but $5,908,54. This general exhibit
shows that in some quarters at least there
has been an effort to retrench expenditures
and that the county is fairly started in the
way to wipe out entirely its indebtedness.
The bonded indebtedness of the county is
$52,000 and during the past year this has
been funded at a lower rate of interest, seven
per cent., thus effecting a considerable an
nual saving in the way of interest. Deduct
ing the cash on. hand March 1, 1882, from
the total liabilities at that date leaves the net
in lebtedness of the county $46,456.46. And
if from this we deduct the handsome school
fund balance in the hands of the Treasurer
the indebtedness is reduced to $40,821.32.
This is not a bad showing for Choteau coun
ty with her valuable public property and
buildings.
In'the recapitulation of expenditures it will
'e observed that the expenses of the District
Court,, including Sheriff's fees, etc., reach
the grand total of P8.890.90. I'his is twice
as mach as l tbUaght to be, considering that
dlating the year there were scarcely three
Sweeks of court. In Gallatin county the past
vear .the total couat expease. -were but
ts84Ps . Why ihoild there be so
gtiat. a difference- ,There ia. such a
thjing as hav,!g officials who are too ssealous,
and i mt l w ,ii r fret the records hat~
kiadotaakhadM. 4atn thep ast yearh h
has drawn ovey $5,000 from the treasury for
services. Look at the allowance of $500 to
Talbert for following Waterhouse down the
river, when it would have been a real blessing
to let the fellow get away and stay! There is
doubtless plenty of room for reform in this
direction, and the Commissioners might find
it profitable to give a few hints in the prem
ises.
The expenses of roads and highways dar:
Ing the year were only $2,085.15, not one
half as much as should have been expended
on the roads of the county. If the court
expenses were reduced one half and the road
bills doubled the tax paxer would be much
better satisfied.
The expenses of the poor and infirm reach
nearly $4,000, rather a large outlay for a
new and progressive county. There are too
many who receive benefits from the poor
fund who do not deserve it, and those in
authority should exercise a little more dis
cretion in the premises. Neither is it a
business like method to send paupers to the
hotels to be boarded at regular rates at the
expense of the county, as has been
done in the past, and, under con
tract, will be repeated next year. It is
about time that the county were providing
a regular poor house where parties who
really deserve aid can secure it without such
a heavy drain on the treasury. A poor farm
property managed would more than support
its inmates, and the establishment of such an
institution would be a matter of economy to
the people.
We believe, however, that the commission
ers, ably seconded by Judge Tattan, have
made a well directed effort the past year to
cut down expenditures, and that they have
succeeded in reducing the indebtedness in no
small sum, nothwithstanding the grievous
burdens above noted, is greatly to their
credit. With the benefit of their past ex
perience they can doubtless be enabled to re
trench in many directions and can present in
1883 a statement even more favorable than
t hat we publish to-day.
First National
OF
Fort Benton.
W. G. CONRAD, President
Jos. S. HILL, Vice-President
R. A. LUKE, Cashier
Authorized Capital ........ ...........$250.000
Capital (paid in) .............................. 100,000
Surplus Profits ............................... 28,000
WE TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING
BUSINE9N.
a Will issue Exchange or Telegraphic Trandfers,
available in all parts of the United States, Canadas
and Europe.
Buy at the highest rates, Gold Dust, goin, Gold
and Silver Bullion and Local Securities.
Keep current accounts with merchants, stockmen
freighters and others subject to sight drafts.
Will pay special attention to collections, and al
other business entrusted to our care.
Will pay interest on time deposits, and discount
notes or bankable paper.
Will.make advances to merchants, stock dealers and
others, as are suited to their requirements.
Will give freight ates on wool to all Eastern cities,
and make iberaladvanceson same at a low rate of
interest.
DIRECTOR :
S. T. HAUSER JOS. S. HILL,
T. C. POWER JNO. HUNSBERGER
W. G, CONRAD, R. A. LUKE,
News and Novelty Depot
STATIONERY AND BLANK BOOKS,
MUSICAL IN8TRUMENTS,
PICTURE FRAMES AND CHROMOS,
FINE CANDIES AND NUTh
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC CIGARS,
BIRD CAGES,
PERAMBULATORS,
S TOY WAGONS,
TOY CARTS AND GIGS,
A Fine Stock of Wall Paper,
MEERSCHAUM GOODS,
FINE WOOD AND BRIER PIPES,
CHOICE SMOKING TOBACCOS
CHOICE CHBEWING TOBACCOS,
VELVET CARD, PHOTO AND CABI
NET FRAMES AND EAt3ELS,
In Great Assortment.
CRANE & GREEN,
Fronet sltreet,
Bet .Bond and Benton. FORT B ENTOL
Choteau House
NSw HOTEL.
Thorougy R Befitted ad leoiwly F.mished.
JERRY SULLIVAN,
1 Conducted on est-clas Epikpl Rverythngne
,w.est sda attattv ai~aries thatweesn
tofer the vHy best O~ Ciit1 eath~n, e
1rsj LALEaerJ A1xa agWOr Wo f 0T da 4h
conETY.
+I . + "
ANNOUNCEMENT!
For Thirty Days Only
..-- :-o-:
We will Sell our Entire Stock of
CLOTHING
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
HATS, CAPT, BOOTS, SHOES, ETC..
AT COST !
-:o:
This is no advertising dodge, we mean business,
and will po just what we say. Try us and
and be covinced.
Orders by Mail or Express will be carefully filled, without delay.
HIRSHBERG & NATHAN,
BAKER & DeLORIMIER,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Dry Goods & Notions
MAIN STREET, BENTON.
We call particular attention to our SHOE STOCK, which is
the most complete in town. We are now showing an elegant
line of
CARPETS, EUGS, MATS, HASSOCKS & OIL CLOTH,
Curtains and Lambrequina, in Lace, Jute, and Raw Silk. Excelsior, Royaf, St. Johns
and Household SEWING MACHINES. Domestic Paper Patterns. Stamping to Order.
Measures taken for the Celebrated Wilson Bro's. Shirts.
ORDERS CAREFULLY FILLED,
SPRINIG CARD, 1882.
-0
We have closed out our lines of Furniture, Hard
ware, and Queensware, and will devote
OURSELVES EXCLUSIVELY TO
uROCERIES,
Dry Goods, Notions, Hats and Caps,
Boots & Shoes, Clothing,
_ AND
Gents' Furnishing Goods.
-o
We keep a full line of Agricultural Implements, and mention among othere the famous
Bain Wagons, Mitchell Wagons,
Milburn Spring Wagons, Top Buggies,
Champion Reapers, Champion Mowers,
Tiger Hay Rakes, Diedrich Hay Press.
Furst & Bradley Breaking and Stirring Plows, 12 to 16 inch, Furst & Bradley and Jersey
ville Sulky Plows, Fanning Mills and Scotch iarrows.
-o-
WE HAVE A COMPLETE LINE OF
CALIFORNIA SADDLES AND HRARNESS,
REPEATING RIFLES AND SHiOT GUNS,
AMMUNITION AND SHELLS.
-o
Ladd's Tobacco Sheep Dip always on hand.
-0
We wil ship the largest and most complete line.of Groceries that ever eame to Fort Benton for that trade,
we have made our requsltions for
FANCY SHELF OODS.
very elaborate, and will undertake to tfmish.anything in that line that may be called for. Our facilitiea for
lling orders are greatly improved, and all orders will receive careful and prompt attention.
Owning our own steamboat Transportation, we will lay our goods down in Benton this year from Chicago
and St.,Lotis at .~-ents per pound, and we propose to give our customers 'the beneit of this low rate, in
prices on oar goods.
Having gou. put of the Indiaa T~d4ng buRinessa we will davote ourselvesto the wants of the Farmer and
Stockii~id, to wheno we oter especial inducements. We have arranged to All all orders for Hardware, Tinware
and Stoares at lowest market rate..
/ 1.axcUIr0T CASH PRICBE FO BEBF HIDUS, FURS AND PELTRIES.
M.- Mh I. G.BAKER & CO.
F0,.RTF zwBrTI;O . T.T. , Marh1n ,1882.

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