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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, June 14, 1882, Image 6

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. RIVER NEWS.
The KeyWest arrived in Benton Thursday
morning at 7:30 o'clock-her second trip
this season-with a cargo of 330 tons. Jos.
Todd, master,. Wm. Perkins, clerk.
PAUSEKGBBB.
A Erickson and family, John G Boyle,
B F Williams. Wm Glen,
Robert Burton.
MANIFEST.
O nignee. Destination. Pkgs.
L Pennington.............Benton. ............ 14
S C Ashby. .............. do ................ 3
Mrs W G Comad......... do ................ 1
W G Conrad.............. do ................ 1
T J Toad & Co........... do ............... 609
IG Baker & Co........... do ..............4310
do do ...........Fort Calgary.......... 16
do do ............Fort Macieud..........1330
NWM Police........... do do ........... 117
do do ............Fort Calgary......... 84
Deschamp & Co..........Benton.......(thresher) 1
The following is the manifest of the Big
Ho n, which passed the Coal Banks Friday
evening:
MANIFEST.
Consignee. Destination. Page.
Gans & Klein.............Benton ................ 4
Crane & Green........... do ................ 17
Hirshberg & Nathan...... do ............... 6
W 8 Wetzel............ do............... 51
M Manuel................ do ................ 1
Rivet Pres ................ do ................ 13
J Hu eberger............. do ................ 9
FC Roosevelt............ do ................ 3
ET Brook................ do ................ 1
It Brenuan.. ....... do ... ............ 8
Murphy, Neel & Co....... do ....... ....... 657
ChataHarlss... ........... do ................ 1
W A Miller... .......... do ................ 4
AM Holt r...............Helena.............. . 181
AP Curtin..... .......do .. ...... 261
C, C & (urtin........... do ................. 605
Sands & Boyce......... do ................ 2
HM Parchen & Co....... do .............. .. 1
RSHale &Co......... do .................. 54
H rmau Bros...........d . ........... 73
8 C P bby.. ............. do .................. 1
Greenhood, Bohm & Co.. do .................. '
G Steell...................Sun River.............. 61
l.teell & Co.............. do ............... 32
E J Morrison...... ......Judith................. 6
McAdow & Dexter....... Andersonville.......... 4
Lt Fuller.................Assinaboine............ 1
Mi.oellaneous.
Clarke, Conrad & Curdi', Helena, 1 car stoves.
W S Wetzel, Benton, 1 car lumber.
R g Culbertson, Benton, 2 cars lumber.
Nelson Todd is muster and John A. Hays
clerk of the Big Horn.
The Big Horn is the twenty-second boat
that has arrived at the Benton levee this
season.
The Dacotah, with the "big, big D," has
at last arrived, having run out her gang
plank on the upper levee at 10 o'clock Sat
urday morning.. Capt. Anderson is in com
mand, with Messrs. Parr and Curry in the
office, with W. J. DeGarno as mate. A more
accommodating and gentlemanly set of men
cannot be found on the river.
PAj*IENGERS.
J B Flynn. Fred Green,
Mr IHoust.)n, Mr Daividson,
A M Bellip, J E Mcbonega] and wife,
Mr Flemni g, Rev Mrs Bull,
A S Harl, 0 Embody,
N 4 Embody, Mr Dick,
A P Ayott, H L Finber,
D JI inwifer, P Beron,
Jae Thoml.aon, S B Limb.
Col. Bnits and family got off at Poplar river, and
MiSs Lizzie Clark at Maginnit landing.
MANIFEST.
Conaignee. Destination. No. Pkgs.
A M Holter & Bro..........Helena............... 186
Paynt r, Brown &)V ... .. do ............... 57
AP Curtmn................. do ............... 516
Clarke, Conrad & Curtin... do ............1750
Witmer Bros.. ............. do ............... 476
Cleo Steell................ do ............... 336
W 8 Wotz I..... ......Benton.............145
Murphy, NeelI& Co........ do . ... .......2628
WH Burgeets.............. do ............... 244
Gaus & Klein... ......... o ............... 11
Parie Gibson............... do .....1
Wm Foster................. do 6
Hirshbbre & Nathan....... do 2.... 3
Crane & Green............. do ............... 5
The Riv r Press ........... do ............. 10
C A Bioadwater & Co .....Maginris............. 15
Broadw'r, McCulloh & Co..Assinaboine.......... 151
McAodw & D .................................... 11
John B Smith.................................... 10
RIPPLES.
The Benton passed Buford up on the 6th.
The Josephine left Bismarck on the 8th
inst.-her third trip- with forty passengers
a 'd a big load of freight.
-The officers of the Key West, from the
captain to steward, are as fine a set of men
as run 'on the upper river, and are deserved
ly pppular, both with our citizens and their
own crew.
Tike Dakotah was delayed seven days at
Nick Wall bar. On account of this delay
she was twenty-two days in making the trip
from Bismarck. Her next trip will show a
much better record.
Three years ago the Rosebud made the
down trip in two days and twenty-one hours,
which is the fastest time on record. John
'['odd was master of the Bud at that time and
Capt. Belk, ndw of the Far West, pilot.
Bergh ought to make Captain Belk of the
Far West an honorary member of the Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Abimals.
Captain Balk refused to take cattle down on
his boat unless a sufficient number of tubs or
half barrels were provided for supplying
them with plenty of water on the trip down.
He also insisted on having an abundance of
hay to feed them on the trip down. The
Captain does not propose to have even
"poor dumb brutes" suffer on his craft if he
can help it.
Bad Vriees 9or Beet.
The following from the Chicago Inter
Ocean of recent date will be of Interest to
stock men. While sach prices obtain it is
no wonder there is a stock boom in Mon
tana, where the best beef in the world Is
produced : "The extraordinary price of
beef is worthy of record. Choice beea cat
tie soild $1%,8 per 100 weight on the hoof at
the Stock Yards yesterday ; porter-house
steaks sold for thilrty cents apound at the
markets, eirlolns twenty-five cents, and
six eoin cents for round steaks. This i. the
highest price beef ba. ever reacippd in Chi
cago., and the probabllity Is that it will go
stIl higher. Fner.ar saee pdlng their dairy
Oregsa btome Republiean.
WAsHINneoN, June 6.-This morning Con
gressman Hubbell, Chairman of the Con
gressional Campaign Committee, received a
telegram from Montgomery, a citizen of
Portland, saying that George bad run ahead
of his ticket and would probably be elected
by a handsome majority. Later in the day
George received the following telegram:
POTLAnaD, June 6, 1882.
Wm. U. George, Washington, D U. :
Multnomah will g-ve y.ou 150 majority,
and the State probably 2 500.
(Signed) SOL. HIS,
G C. STEEL.
Multnomah is Representative George's
home county. 4
Representative George was warmly con
gratulated to-day by his Relpublican esso
ciates upon his re-election.. Mr. George is
the first member elect to the 48th Congress,
and he is the only representative from that
State elected for two terms since Oregon was
admitted into the Union.
Coming.
BERLIN, June 5.-Prince Henry, son of
the Crown Prince Frederick William, will
visit America in Oct' ber.
CttEFRII'i GRIAND CHARGE.
The Tempestuous charge of Gen. Custer
at Yeilow tavern, Vs., Where
Gen. Jeb. Stuart tell.
The situation by 3:30 p. in. on the 11th of
May was one of anxiety to all, and all be
heved that the crises was near at hand
Within an area of ten miles ei. hteen thou
sand cavalry were now forming their lines
for deadly battle. The prize was an import
ant one. Not only was the reputation of the
leaders at issue but Richmond was in actual
danger, for at the hour ot noon on the 11th
only the line of Stuart lay between Sheridan
and the Confederate Capital. This was be
lieved at the time by the Union officers in
command, ,and has since been verified by the
interesting article written by Colonel Cooke
and published in the Times of March 18,
1882. Nor wis this all; if Stuart could halt
us in front, if Hampton could force in our
rear and thus hold us until the morrow,
troops could be hastened forward from Pe
teisburg and the Union cavalry could be
crushed on the 12+h. This was the day
dream of Mr. Davis and measures were taken
to effect this end. From prisoners and other
sources of information the staff were fully
apprized of the many distinguished officers
in command of the Confederate line in front
of us,' many of whom were personally known
to those in command of the Union troops.
Stuart, Fitz Lee and Lomax were well known
to Gregg, Merritt, Gibbs and Custer. Stuart
was in the zenith of lis great reputation as a
dashing officer, prererring to fight mounted
ratber thani dismounted, while Sheridan, con
scious of the superior a'mament and tqusl
valor of his horsemen, had the reputation ot
a man whose habit was to win.
It was at this critical hour, as nearly as
(can be remembered, 3:30 p. in., while in
company with General Merritt near the con
vergence or roads oarectuy in trout of
Breatbed'*(rebel) Battery, and in rear of our
dismounted troops, that an event took place
in the life of General Custer that immortal
izes him in the history of the day. Fully
realizing that the moment for striking a d -
cisive blow had come, he rode up to Merritt
and said:
"Merritt , I am going to charge that bat
tery."
His manner was gallant and determined,
and the response of Merritt, "Go in General,
I will give you all the support in my power,"
sent him away in the gayest mood. Ju-t at
this moment General Sheridan and two i r
three of his staff reached our headquarter,
having arrived from Gregg and Wilson, ano
reported the line on flank and rear secure be
yond all doubt. General Merritt Immediate
ly told Sheridan that Custer was about to
charge the battery that had given us so much
tzouble. Sheridan's reply was:
"Bully for Custer. 1.11 wait and see it."
By this time Custer was seen forming his
mrigade in column of regiments, placing his
aimunted band in front. His headquarter's
flag, of the gayest colors, was seen flying in
advance of the moving mass of blue and
glittering blades. The shrill blast of a hun
dred bugles, with the familiar air of "Yankee
Doodle" by the band, rang out upon the bat
tle-field, while fully eighteen hundred brave
men of the Michigan brigade rode boot to
boot into what seemed the very jaws of
death.
There was a depressibn in the plain that
lay between the point where Custer formed
and the eminence on which the battery was
in- position. The task of reaching the guns
was further complicated by a deep "Virginia
ditch" running parallel to the enemy's line
over which were three corduroy field bridges.
This ditch was impassable at all points in
Custer's frent and the entire brigade had to
break from regimental front to column of
fours, crofs the bridge and reform in the
face of a term: fire from the battery, now
t irned upon it: Fortunately, the enemy's
guns could not be depressed sufficiently to be
effective upon the troops while crosslog the
ditch =id s ef' hipg. 'his obstacle overcome
(aud it was done ino very asbrt time) the
charge was made pp the rising ground with
in aigidtot the Un ifli The wild hs e
o! thiads t ofe fretan right to left went
up to ther the ,gmt hosteen as they
d Ue4 -piup.~ h u and plucky
6= .or f t~l*! nI thanp
twenty minutes from the time the bugle
sounded the charge the enemy was complete
ly routed, with the loss of many killed and
captured, with all his artillery, save the piece
and that was flying from the field in an east
erly direction, while everywhere in front of
us could be seen the broken fragments of
Stuart's troops. The fury of this splendid
charge was soon exhausted and became a
fruitless pursuit, as the 'enemy once broken
retired so rapidly that capture was impossible
and the recall was sounded within a mile
from the point where the battery was cap
tured.
General Sheridan remained, with General
Merritt, an eye-witness to the splendid charge
maniftsting great interest when . apprised
that the obstacle of the ditch bad to be
passed; but as he saw the promptness with
which it was overcome and the rapid forma
tions after its passage, his eye took in the
situation at a glance, and he expressed the
belief that Stuart's support to the battery
would be unable to check the force
and impetuosity of the ch'irge. As Custer's
men emerged from the depression at a trot,
and when on the higher ground the advance
struck the gallop, under the firing of the bat
tery, which now had perfect range of horse
and man, the scene was of the most exciting
character. When the guns were reached
and passed, and the brigade was lost to sight
in the smoke and dust that enveloped it, the
whole line from right to left was advaneed,
the victory was assured to the Union troops.
At this moment General Sherman turned to
Merritt, his face radiant with joy, and said:
"General Merritt send a staff officer tt,
General Custer, and give him my compli
ments. The conduct of himself and brigade
deserves the most honorable mention."
The writer had the pleasure of conveying
the gratifying message to Custer, who was
found some half mile or more beyond the
point where he had captured the battery.
Tue chirge was over and the recall was be
ing sounded for the mounted men to reform.
He received the compliment paid him with
evident pleasure, modestly expressing his
thanks, and deeming the "honorable men
tion" of his brigade, while under his person
al command, one of the most pleasing and
fortunate episodes of his life.
A sense of relief was experienced by the
whole command, and the situation, for hours
previous so critical, was now one of un
doubted success. The news that Gen. Stuart
was mortally wounded soon reached us
through prisoners that tell into our hands,
and it was also soon learned that the confed
erate cavalry were unsupported by any
t o ps from Richmond. The latter was de
sirable news, as it made it advisable to move
on the capital, some eight miles from the
battle-field, or at least to threaten the town.
THE C NFEDERATE VERSION.
The following extract from (the rebel)
Colonel Cooke's paper describing this partic
ular event on May 11, in connection with the
fail of Stewart and his subsequent death,
will be read with interest by those who were
present on the main line:
It was now the at ternoon and the Federal
column had not made a decisive advance to
attack Stuart, who was waiting in line of
battle to receive them. About four o'clock
the expected. assault was suddenly made.
Stuart was beside Breathed's guns, near his
centre, when the edge of the woods on the
mountain road swarmed with blue horsemen,
every sabre drawn, and the line rushed upon
the guns. The attack was so. sudden and
overpowering that nothing could stand be
fore it. The- weight of it fell on the left
grader General Lomax. and this gave way
under the pressure. The line fell into. die
order and was apparently about to break
when Stuart. made his appearance in the
midst of the hottest of the fight, calling to
the men to rally. He was everywhere, with
drawn sabre and flushed face, encouraging
his tro bps, and under the effect of his pres
ence the men reform ed and met the enemy
sabre to sabre. Stuart personally led the
charge, for by this time the hot blood of the
soldier was completely aroused in him, and
for a time the result seemed doubtful. I
was soon, however, decided. The Federal
force was too heavy and the right, under the
personal command of General Fitz Lee, be
gan to be shaken also. The battle had evi
dently reached the turning point and Stuart
saw the desperate character of his ituastion.
It was difficult to use his artillery in such a
melee of friend and foe, and his left wing
was soon in utter disorder. The Federal at
tack had at last succeeded in breaking it to
pieces; the men were scattering in every di
rection and seeing Major Breathed near him
Stuart shouted: "Breathed, take command
of all the mounted men in the road and hold
it against whatever comes. If this road is
lost we are gone." * * * The field was a
scene of the wildest confusion. Federals
and Confederates were darting in every di.;
rection, and one of the former as he darted
by Stuart, fired at him and shot him through
the body.
He Did Line His DaS.
"You musn't scold my sister," said an
8-year-old urchin quite pompously, as he
introduced his 8-year-old sister to the pri
mary teacber, "'cause whttn she makes a
uilsttke she cries like msamma does; but
(with a look Of superiority) I 4on't; I do like
papL"
"What does your papa do ?' asked the
amssaed targe$ master of the yeang kiss.
'lHe tbrowe down the beatuwr and say.,
Qh. daten the difference I"
T. C.POWER 809.
HEADQUARTERS
FOR
Farming Implements,
Sheep Men's Supplies,
Miners' Supplies,
Dry Goods, Groceries.
-0
Being agents for the celebrated WOOD'S FARMING MACHINERY, we have constantly
on hand
MOWERS, REAPERS AND EXTRAS,
ALSO THE BEST HAY RAKES IN USE,
--0
Wool Sacks, Twine, Sheep Dip.
--0-
Garden Seeds,
We have now on hand a large and varied assortment of Garden Seeds, fresh from the old
established house of D. M. FERRY & CO.
Dry Goods, hats, Cpi, Boots, Shoes
AND NOTIONS.
Our stocks in the above lines will be complete on the arrival of the first boats, and is large,
selected with great care, and shipped direct from Eastern mirkets. Being large
buyers, our goods come from first hands, which accounts for ths rep
utation we have for
Low Prices and First-Class Goods.
-o
LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
--0-
We can furnish low figures on application on all kinds of Hardware, Glass Ware, Queens
ware and Wooden Ware.
FURNITURE AND CARPETS
OF ALL GR ADES.
Tremendous
CRASH IN PRICES!
AT
To make room for the
immense stock of goods
now enroute from the
East by the first boats.
Be sure and call on the
Clothiers of Montana,
GANlS & E LHZW N.
Upper Front St., Benton, M.T.
NEXT DOOR TO BANK' [email protected] MONTANA.

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