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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, March 30, 1904, Image 8

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GOVERNMENTAL
CONTROL FOR
EMPLOYERS and
EMPLOYEES
m
m
efaffa
By CHAULES W. ELIOT.
President of
Harvard University
HE present tendencies of labor unions and employers'
associations suggest strongly the expediency of estab
lishing over them GOVERNMENTAL INSPEC
TION AND CONTROL, and this for two reasons—
first, that both kinds of association soon become
monopolistic, and, secondly, that they are secret so
cieties. Democratic government, like despotic government, dislikes
secret societies, particularly if they are apt to resort to VIOLEN CE
for the enforcement of their demands.
IN ALL SOCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL STRIFE IT IS IMMEASUR
ABLY BETTER TO USE THE GREAT FORCES OF PUBLICITY, DIS
CUSSION AND FELLOW FEELING BEFORE PHYSICAL CONFLICTS
TAKE PLACE RATHER THAN AFTER THEY HAVE OCCURRED.
It is therefore fin intensely interesting inquiry what modifica
tions of existing labor conditions will tend toward permanent indus
trial peace and be ABSOLUTELY CONSISTENT with the demo
cratic ideal of liberty. To that inquiry I turn.
(1) Steadiness of employment is reasonably desired by both the
workmen and the employer. Labor is a commodity which should be
salable EOR FUTURE DELIVERY, and not be merely delivered
at a price for the passing day. On the other hand, the enormous
investments of capital which many manufactures now require make
it of groat consequence to the employer that he should be able to
count for at least one year on the cost of his labor.
(2) Another common need for workmen and employers is that
condition of labor which permits that laborer to have a settled place
of abode. A nomad population can hardly be a ei.ilized one. Only
a firmly settled laboring population which desires and expects to pass
its life in one spot can be REALLY 1IAPPY AND CONTENTED
and produce good citizens.
(3) In manufactures which require large and costly plants and
numerous operatives the strife between labor and capital would be
pacified in the most substantial and durable manner if means could
be found of giving the workmen two things which they now obtain
but rarely in a highly organized industry—first, A VOICE IN THE
DISCIPLINE OF THE WORKS, including that very important
part of discipline, the dealing with complaints, and, secondly, A
DIRECT PECUNIARY INTEREST besides wages in the pro
ceeds of the combined application of the capital and the labor to the
steady production of salable goods.
Two other humane conditions of labor, if generally introduced,
would render industrial conflicts less frequent and greatly mitigate
their severity. These are the RISING WAGE—rising, that is,
with years and experience—and the PENSION or retiring allow
ance at disability.
AGAIN, A BOLD, ALERT AND VIGOROUS DEMOCRACY WILL AL
WAYS BELIEVE IN EVERY MAN DOING HIS BEST AND BEING
FREE TO DO HIS BEST, WHATEVER HIS STATION OR FUNCTION
IN SOCIETY.
A Woman's Money Value to Her Husband
By Rev. OLYMPIA BROWIV of Racine, Wis.
THERE have been more silly poetry and sentiment about
the home than about ANY OTHER THING in our
modern life. We don't want silly poetry and senti
ment any longer. WE WANT FACTS and to know
what is our duty in this emergency. The home for many
years has been on a false basis. We want it put on a basis of recog
nition of the fact that WOMAN IN THE HOUSEHOLD HAS
A PECUNIARY VALUE.
If I earn $1,000 in a profession and give up that profession to
marry .John Jones, to care for hi.- household and to bring up his
children, I AM WORTH $1,000 TO JOHN JONES. Of
course if a woman is doing nothing in a home her services are not
worth anything'.
BUT THERE OUGHT NOT TO BE ANY SUCH WOMAN IN EX
ISTENCE, AND WE WANT NO SUCH WOMEN.
THE CAUSES Of ECONOMIC SLAVERY
By Count LEO TOLSTOI
What are the
THE SLAVES
N what does economic slavery consist?
forces THAT MAKE SOME MEN
OF OTHERS? If we ask all the workers in Russia,
Europe and in America, alike in the factories and in
various situations in which they work for hire in
towns and villages, what has made them choose the position in which
they are living, they will all reply that they have been brought to it
either because they had no land on which they could
and wished to live and work, or that taxes, direct and
indirect, were demanded of them, which they could
only pay BY SELLING THEIR LAHOR, or
that they remained at factory work ensnared by the
more luxurious habits they have adopted and which
they can gratify only by selling their labor and their
LIBERTY. ^ '
The first two conditions, the lack of land and the taxes, DRIVE
man to compulsory labor, while tin third, his increased and unsatis
fied needs, DECOYS him to it and keeps him at it.
THESE CAUSES, ACTING ON PEOPLE FROM DIFFERENT SIDES,
ARE SUCH THAT NONE CAN ESCAPE FROM THEIR ENSLAVEMENT.
The agriculturist who has no land or who has not enough will
always be obliged to go into perpetual or temporary slavery to the
landowner in order to have the opportunity of feeding himself from
the land. Should lie in one way or the other obtain land enough to
be able to feed himself from it by his own labor, such taxes, direct
or indirect, are demanded from him that in order to pay them HE
HAS AGAIN TO GO INTO SLAVERY.
montana brieflets.
SHORT ITEMS OF NEWS FROM
OVER THE STATE.
\A hat Has Happened in Montana During
the Past Few Days.
B elgrade , March 25.—The Gallatin
Milling" company recently received or
ders for twenty-eight carloads of flour
for shipment to Arkansas, Missouri
and Louisiana. The entire quantity
s to be put in twenty-four pound
acks. The company has decided to
build a 100,000 bushel elevator.
H elena , March 25.—Coroner Yae
ger left today for Littlejohn siding, 17
miles above Helena, to investigate the
cause of the death of a man there.
The man was found dead last night
beside the railroad track, section men
being the finders. His name is un
known, and also the cause of his death,
although it is believed he died from
freezing.
G lendive , March 25.—Fred Wil
iams was brought to Glendive yester
day by Deputy Sheriff Frank, of Wi
baux, and lodged in jail to await trial
before the district court on the charge
of arson. Williams is charged with
having attempted to burn a building
belonging to John Douthett by setting
fire to the contents of a can of kero
sene. The blaze was discovered and
extinguished before it had gained
headway.
B utte , March 25' —The trial of
Mike Mulich on the charge of murder
was begun this morning in Judge
McClernan's court. Mulich is accused
of stabbing Joseph Stukel on the
night of January 31, the result of
which caused Stukel's death a short
time later. Mulich admits the stab
bing, but avers that it was done in
self-defense. Stukel was a large man,
aud the defendant weighs hardly more
than 125 pounds. The fight in which
Stukel was stabbed occurred in a
dance hall at Meaderville.
M issoula , March 25.— There was a
shooting affray a few minutes after six
o'clock yesterday morning at the Ex
change saloon, and as a result Jerry
Wiggins, a bartender, lies dying at
the Sister's hospital, while his assail
ant, Charles Gunther, occupies award
at Parson & Brown's hospital, aud
has but one chance in a thousand for
his life. LenReed, assistant mana
ger of the Exchange saloon, who tried
to prevent the tragedy, escaped by a
miracle. The trouble had its origin
over a woman by the name of Lottie
Cunningham, a variety actress.
H elena , March 27.—Albert R.
Gates, proprietor of the Grandon ho
tel and one of the best known business
of the capital city, was stricken with
apoplexy about noon today and 15
minntesiater a successful business ca
reer of more than a quarter of a cen
tury in Helena had come to an end.
K alispell , March 26.—L. H
Brown, of Danville, Ind.. a stockman,
has been in the city several days this
week, and while here purchased three
head of the Conrad buffalo and will
purchase two more. They will be
shipped to his home in Danville, where
they will be kept for breeding pur
poses.
G lendive , March 26. —Three en
gines pushing a Russell snowplow were
derailed twenty-five miles east of
Dickinson this forenoon. Engineer
Grund of the first engine lost a leg
and his fireman was slightly injured.
The wrecked engines had been "buck
ing" snow for two days when the ac
cident occurred and it was thought
that the blockade had been broken.
H elena , March 26.—Charles Porter
and Hank Williams, both colored,
with Rosie Lourain and Frank Lat
tadi, are in the city jail, held ou sus
picion that they have knowledge con
ceruing tlio robbery of Maggie Smith,
which occurred last Sunday night, iu
which the Smith woman claims to have
ost $2,900. Porter was arrested ou
suspicion at the time of the robbery,
but was released almost immediately
afterwards, as there appeared to be no
ground for suspicion.
L ivingston , March 26.—Billy Ilo
fer, the park scout and guide, was in
the city Thursday evening on his re
turn from trip to his fox island in the
North Pacific. The fox-breeding es
tablishment was started in 1900, and
this year's killing was the first crop.
Mr. Hofer and his men secured about
180 pelts. They will be marketed iu
Loudon. The value of the pelts is
about $4,000, but the Russo-Japanese
war has reduced their value about 40
per cent., as the principal market for
'the blue fox is in Russia. Mr. Hofer,
however, will keep at the business,
which promises in the end to be ex
tremely profitable.
B ig T imuek , March 28. —The 20 wit
nesses called from this county to testi
fy iu the Stewart brothers sheep steal
ing case, which is on trial in White
Sulpher Springs this week, were tied
up iu a suow drift between Lombard
and Dorsey, and were forced to walk
through the suow aud storm a distance
of six miles to Dorsey to catch the
stage for White Sulphur Springs.
B ouldkk , March 28.— There was
general excitement iu Boulder this
morning when the news was brought
to town that Burton C. Warner had
committed suicide bv blowing his
MUSS OT SORES
Awful Suffering uf a Buy
from an Itching
Humour.
CURED BfGilTICURA
Not One Square Inch of Skin on
His Whole Body Was
Unaffected.
" My little son, a boy of five, broke
out with an itching raah. Three doc
tors prescribed for him, but he kept
getting worse until we could not dress
him any more. They finally advised
me to try a certain medical college, but
its treatment did not do any good. At
tbe time I was induced to try Cuticura
Remedies he was so bad that I had to
cut his hair off and put the Cuticura
Ointment on him on bandages, as it was
impossible to touch him with the bare
hand. There was not one square Inch
of skin on his whole body that was not
affected. He was one mass of sores.
The bandages used to stick to his skin
and In removing them it used to take
the skin off with them, and the screams
from the poor child were heart-break
ing. I began to think that he would
never get well, but after the second
application of Cuticura Ointmeùt I
began to see signs of improvement,
and with the third and fourth applica
tions the sores commenced to dry up.
His skin peeled off twenty times, but It
finally yielded to the treatment. I used
the Cuticura Resolvent for his blood,
and now I can say that he is entirely
cured, and a stronger and healthier boy
you never saw than he is to-day."
ROBERT WATTAM,
4922 Center Ave., Chicago, 111., Dec.
30, 1897.
No return in six years, Mr. Wattam
writes, Feb. 23, 1903.
" Your letter of the 21st in regard to
the case of my little boy at hand. I am
truly thankful to say that the cure
effected by the Cuticura Remedies has
been a most thorough and successful
cure to date."
Bold throughout the world. Cutîenr* Re«olT«nt, 50c.
(in form of Chocolate Coated Pilla, 25c. per viml of 60),
Ointment, fiOc.. 8 wk 25c. Denotat London, 27 Charter
house Sq. ; Pari»,.* Rue de la Paixt Boeton ^lST Colnmbut
brains out with a gun. While this
tragedy was being talked about and
the cause leading up to it, another one
was being enacted in Boulder with C.
O. Schodell as the principal actor.
Schoedel formerly lived at the Warner
ranch and is said to be the indirect
cause of a proposed separation be
tween Mr. and Mrs. Warner.
K alispell , March 28.—Thomas,
the 18-year-eld son of .fohn Quann,
who lives a few miles south of Kalis
pell, while in company with another
young man, was drowned in the Flat
head river at the steel bridge Sunday
afternoon. The two had just received
a new canvas boat and were trying it
at that point when the boat capsized
and both went into the water. His
companion cltm? to the boat, while
Quaun attempted to swim ashore.. The
water being ice cold, he soon chilled
aud went to the bottom. His body
was found two hours afterwards.
H elena , March 28.—The Capital
Stock Food company has been organ
ized in Helena, and will engage in the
manufacture of stock food, poultry
food, worm powders, gall cure aud
colic cure. The interested persons
are Heleua men. This will be the
only company engaged iu the manu
facture of stock food aud veterinary
remedies between St. Paul aud the
Pacific coast, aud it is expected that
the concern will find a ready market
for its medicines, as there has been a
demand for something of the kind by
the stockgrowers of the Northwest for
several years past.
Lewistoyvn , March 28.— Word has
reached Lewistovvn that three sheep
herders aud as many bauds of sheep
were lost during the blizzard of last
week in the country sixty miles south
east of Lewistowu. Searching parties
started out and Friday the body of
Pat Haggerty, au old aud well known
herder, was discovered, but no trace
lias yet been found of the other two,
nor of any of the sheep. Haggerty
was frozen to death. He was about
00 years of age. Two of the bands of
sheep belong to Nolan & Thompson
and the other to Ed Currie. Stock
men report the storm as haviutr been
a severe one.
Claims Treaty Is I'nconstitutional.
W ashington , March 28.—Warn.n
B. Wilson, a lawyer of Chicago, to
day filed iu the district supreme court a
bill in equity for an injunction against
Secretary Shaw, the republic of Pana
ma. the Panama Canal company of
France anil others, to stop the con
struction of the Panama canal. He
asks that Secretary Shaw be enjoined
from permitting the payment of a.iy
moneys under Iiis control utuli-r
the pretended authority of the void
act of June 2S, 1902, entitled "Au act
to provide for the construction of a
canal connecting the waters of the At
lantic and Pacific oceans."
He avers that there is no appropri
ation by law of any money for the
payment of any of the construction
expenses, and declares that the act of
June 28, 1902, is iu violation of the
constitution of the United States, at d
that it is null and void. He charges
that the treaty is wholly unconstitu
tional and invalid, both in the United
States and in Panama, in Us essential
features, and gives no rights and im
poses no obligations on either* of the
parties directly concerned.
Charged With Land Frauds
S an F rancisco , March 28.—The
preliminary hearing of F. A. Hyde
and Henry Dimond, accused of ob
taining government lands by fraudu
lent means, was resumed today before
United States Commissioner Heacock.
The attorneys for the defendants asked
that they be discharged on the ground
that the United States had not been
defrauded. They claim that if a fraud
was committed it was against the state
of Oregon and California and in that
case the accused men were answerable
to those states The indictment was
also attacked on other technicalities.
Fine Book and Job Printing a spe
cialtv at the River Press office.
IMPORTED STALLIONS.
J-j C* LOWREY, Of Nevada, Iowa, a
* farmer and importer, will be in Helena,
Mont., about April 15, 1904, with a car of high
class imported and native-bred Percheron Stal
lions. ^lr. Lowrey has had a lifetime experience
with draft horses, importing more than 500 head
in the last 20 years, having crossed the Atlantic
22 times during this time. Is also something of a
farmer, they owning over 1,400 acres of land, liv
ing there, farming and keeping a lot of registered
mares, constantly raising aud improving his stock.
This will be Mr. Lowrey's fourth trip to Mon
tana, he having sold many good stallions here dm-
ing the eighties; among them was the great show
stallion Brilliant—now owned by the Lewis Live
stock Co., of Fort Logan—who took sweepstakes
at Helena in a ring of 40 horses.
If you are wanting a gilt-edge young stallion
from 2 to 0 years old, black, bay or dark grey in
color, good low down thick individuals, don't fail
to come up to Helena after April 15. They will be
sold at
Bedrock Prices
Under a literal guarantee, as there will be no one
around trying to organize companies, giving
away part of the shares to some smooth fellow to
induce him to bring in aud rob his neighbor.
Prices on these horses will be from $600 to $1,200.
For further information write to
H. C. LOWrCy« care Stockman & Farmer, Helena, Mont.
References, Farmers' Bank, of Nevada, Iowa, or Iowa
Agricultural College, Ames, Iowa.
A HOT FIRE
Will destroy Capps' clothing, but this guar
antee covers almost everything else :
COPYRIGHTED JULY I. 1902.
miï THE FABRIC IN THIS GARMENT
W IS WARRANTED ^
\m% PURE WQQl x
EVERY PROCESS FROM THE RAW WOOL
TOTHE»lSHEDJ&ARfepT IS CONDUCTED
UtfDEÄteÖäÄED I AÄSUÄlNßSa 0N IN
I MELTON SUITINGS
Ül ALIZARIN E*ÖYE9 i
STAB LI S HE
839
Beautifully tailored, pure wcol, fast colors. Latest
and most fashionable fabrics, and guaranteed in
every way to give the wearer perfect satisfaction.
S15 the
MADE THE BEST
suit
THE BEST MADE
SOLE AGENTS, FORT BENTON, MONT.
SSS3«
irttî
Oompotinae .
D. G L0CKW00D,
DRUGS AND
JEWELRY.
A Complete Line of Watches,
Jewelry and Silverware on Hand.
D. G LOCKWOOD,
Repair Work oo Jewelry and Watches
solicited. Every job personally guaran
teed .
Front Street, Fort Benton.
We Build. Boats
Parties contemplating a
trip down the
.... Missouri River....
Are requested to get our
figures on Boats of all
kinds.
We Also do All Kinds of Building and
Contracting.
Estimates Furnished ^
HAGEN & WICKHORST
Builders and Contractors.
The W eekly R iver P ress is a good
newspaper to send away to your friends
in the east. It will save you tbe trou
ble of writing letters.

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