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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, July 13, 1904, Image 7

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CHEERS FOE CLEVELAND.
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION
PAYS TRIUITE TO FORMER
PRESIDENT.
The Anti-Uryan Faction of the Party Is In
Full Control.
St. Louis , July 6.— The democratic
national convention to name the par
ty's choice for president aud vice pres
ident of the United States was called
to order in the Coliseum shortly after
the noon hour today by Chairman
Jones of the national committee, and
organized. The open session was
taken up with the address of the tem
porary chairman, and the announce
ment of committees. Tomorrow will
come the address of the permanent
chairman aud the reports of commit
tees, including platform. The climax
of the nominations will not be reached
until the third day, and perhaps
later.
By the time the hall was one-third
full the heat began to increase to a
noticeable degree. The auditorium
from the speaker's stand was one flut
ter as the palm leaf fans bobbed back
and forth. The delegates lost but lit
tle time in doffing their coats. With
the exception of the temperature, which
was a serious drawback, the effect was
not unlike a slow snowfall gradually
whitening the surface of the ground.
Shortly after the noon hour Chair
man Jones directed the sergeant at
arms to procure order. He continued
tapping the table with his gavel, but
it was some time before quiet reigned.
California's appearance with a huge
silk banner and a silk American Hag,
and a yell, "California!'California!
Hearst! Hearst! Hearst!" caused
cheering. Just as the California dele
gation reached its reservation after
marching up and down the center
aisle, W. J. Bryan, who had come in
unnoticed, arose in his place and was
given a cheer. Then an enterprising
member of the Montana delegation
created a diversion by vigorously
ringing a cowbell.
The convention today listened to an
extended speech from Representative
John Sharp Williams, its temporary
chairman, appointed the.committees
necessary to perfect a permanent or
ganization and adjourned. In a ses
sion lasting two hours and fifty min
utes, one striking incident over
shadowed all other proceedings. That
was the enthusiastic and prolonged
cheering which greeted the name of
Grover Cleveland. While the out
burst which greeted the name of the
former democratic president before
its last syllable had fallen from the
lips of the temporary chairman was
noteworthy in Itself, it was magnified
by contrast with the greeting accorded
the actual persons of men who stood
for all that had been opposed by Mr.
Cleveland and others in the party dur
ing the last eight years.
Listening attentively to the demo
cratic doctrine laid down by Mr. Wil
liams, the conservatives found occa
sion for the first demonstration when
reference was made to the record of
former President Cleveland. All the
shackled party interest which had lain
dormant through two national con
ventions was released as by the touch
of a trigger. The name of Cleveland
was echoed from a thousand throats.
Hats, handkerchiefs, fans and arms
were waved, delegates and spectators
stood on their chairs and the last
semblance of order was turned into
confusion which the convention offi
cials were powerless to subdue.
While the outburst was at its height.
Mr. Bryan's following attempted to
convert the demonstration into ap
plause for their leader. The name of
Bryan was yelled lustily, but in vain.
Shouting of "Grover" aud "Cleve
land" was renewed and the Bryan fol
lowing was hissed. The greatest sig
nificance was attached to the showing
maue by the conservatives. Their ab
solute control of the convention is no
longer doubted even by those who
have heretofore declined to be con
vinced.
A^ Mr. Williams proceeded in his
speech his voice increased in volume
and tlie delegates listened attentively.
The convention appeared decidedly
amused at Mr. Williams' humorously
sarcastic reference to the "mutual ad
miration society" of Mr. Roosevelt,
aud when he read au eulogy by the
president ou Mr. Root the delegates
laughed aud applauded. Mr. Wil
liams spoke in an ironical tone that
caught the fancy of the convention
and he was interrupted time acd time
again by laughter.
When Mr. Williams concluded his
address he was completely exhausted.
The prespiration was streaming from
his face, Iiis collar was a soft white
roll of linen, his voice was worn to a
frazzle and could not be heard twenty
feet from where lie stood. As he fin
ished, after speaking for one hour and
forty minutes, the band struck up a
medley of patriotic airs, the stirring
strains of Dixie calling forth wild
cheers that never fail to follow the
song, no matter when or where ren
dered.
Rainy Season Delays Fighting.
St. Petersburg , July 5.—A war
correspondent who has arrived from
Mukden expresses the opinion that
with the rainy season at hand, the
Japanese have lost their opportunity
of dealing General Kuropatkin a
crushing blow. He says the world in
general did not know the weakness of
General Kuropatkin\s army at the
early part of the war, but
that when he left. June IS, Ku
ropatkin had 125,000 men, and rein
forcements were pouring in at the rate
of 2,000 a day.
Earlier, the correspondent thinks,
the Japanese could have done any
thing they wished, if (they had pressed
the campaign with vigor.
Celebrate Republican Anniversary.
Jackson , Mich., July 6.—Five
thousand people assembled in Loomis
park here today to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the birth of the repub
lican party "Under the Oaks," this
city, July 6, 1854. It was hereon that
date that the first state convention
acting under the name "republican"
was held. The state ticket nominated
on that day went through a campaign
to election-day success.
Secretary of State John Hay, who
was private secretary to Abraham
Lincoln, the first republican president,
was the orator of the day. Other
prominent guests were speaker Cannon
of the house of representatives, Sena
tor Fairbanks, republican candidate
for vice president, and Senator Bur
rows.
An interesting feature of the exer
cises was a body of "Fremont voters"
and men who cast their votes for the
"Pathfinder." Grand Army uniforms
were woru and silver locks were kept
among them and the representation of
these "charter men" was notable.
When the morning exercises at the
grove were concluded, the distin
guished guests were driven to the ho
tel where they were tendered a recep
tion.
The Socialist-Labor Ticket.
New York , July 6.— Chas. H. Cor
regan of New York, aud Wm. M. Cox
of Illinois, were chosen as candidates
for president and vice president res
pectively by the national convention
of the socialist-labor party in session
here today. There was very little dis
cussion over the selection of candi
dates.
A Dig Mining Deal.
Denver , July 6.—One of the big
gest mining deals made in this state
for some time was consummated, ac
cording to a report received here to
day, by the transfer of the stock of
the Gold King Miniüg company of
Silverton to the Ventura Mining com
pany. The price paid is said to be
$5,000,000.
Sho-it Stories of the War.
London , July T.—The Liao Yang
correspondent of the Daily Telegraph,
in a dispatch, dated July 7, says: A
battle is proceeding 25 miles from
here. Numbers of wounded are being
brought in from the mountains. It is
believed the Japanese are continuing
their advance, with the object of cut
ting off Mukden.
St. Petersburg , July 6.—A few
nights ago Admiral Togo attempted
to repeat the Japanese exploit with
torpedo boats at Wei Hai Wei during
the Chinese-Japanese war by sending
torpedo boat destroyers into the har
bor of Port Arthur for the purpose of
sinking ships at their anchorage, but
the attempt ended in disastrous fail
ure.
Four torpedo boat destroyers suc
ceeded in creeping into the harbor,
which was not protected by booms,
but only one escaped. Two was sunk
by the shore batteries aud one was
crippled. The reckless bravery of the
Japanese in going to almost certain
destruction excites nothing but ad
miration here.
Another Fire at Exposition.
St. Louis , July 5.— Fire at 2:20
o'clock this morning in the kitchen of
the American cafe, in the Jerusalem
concession at the World's Fair
grounds, threatened Festival hall,
west of the pavilion and the whole Je
rusalem exhibit. After considerable
excitement among the Turks, Arabs
and other Oriental people who were
asleep when the fire broke out, it was
gotten under' control. The American
cafe, which is in two wings and elab
orately furnished, was gutted in both
wings. The loss is estimated at $15,
000.
lîeavcrs .Must Stand Trial.
New York , July *.—George W.
Beavers, former superintendent of thu
bureau of salaries and allowances in
the postoffice department will be taken
to Washington for trial under the in
dictments found there by the federal
grand jury for alleged acceptance of
compensation for securing a govern
ment contract for typewriters.
This was decided at Brooklyn today
by United States Judge Thomas, who
held that the orders given for the re
moval of Beavers were illegal. A
new bond of 810,000 was required,
pending the furnishing of which Beav
ers was remanded to the custody of
the United States marshal.
Water right blanks—only correct
form published—for sale at the River
Press office.
A DEADLY EXPLOSIVE.
Fearful Eriect of Powder Used
In Japanese Shells.
MEN LITEBALLY BLOWN TO PIECES
Or. Wada, Stall Stfi'soun of the Jnpn
EOKC- Navy. UeportN Tluit IIo Ex
tructoil One Hundred mid Twenty
three Fragments of Shell From n
Russian Sailor's Body.
The terrible force of Shiinose pow
der, the new explosive used by the
Japanese army and navy, is shown by
the report of Dr. Wada, a staff surgeon
of the Japanese navy who assisted in
caring for the wounded Russian sailors
from the cruiser Variag, says a London
cable dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.
Twenty-four wounded sailors were
cared for on the French cruiser Pascal
for four days. From one of the wound
ed men J23 pieces of Japanese shell
were extracted.
The largest piece showed that the
outer walls of the shell were not more
than three-eighths of an inch thick and
had been tired from nothing smaller
than six inch guns. Nothing but a
high explosive could smash a strong
steel shell into such minute fragments.
Dr. Wada described how decks were
made slippery with blood. Ile saw
small bits of flesh and bone scattered
everywhere. He stumbled over an
arm here, a leg there. The llesh was
often torli from the bodies. Nothing
but a high explosive shell could have
produced such effects.
The wounds caused by the powder
are no worse than those caused by old
fashioned shells and shrapnel. If a
man hit is lucky enough not to be
killed he stands a good chance of get
ting off unhurt: or only slightly wound
ed. Two sailors stood on the bridge
with Captain Itudnieff and Count Nirod
and a petty officer. One of the new
Japanese shells struck the petty officer.
It was one of those shells provided
with a fuse, taking effect not only on
contact with the water, but whenever
it touches part of the rigging, living
men, or even their clothing.
Wherever the resistance is sufficient
to alter the speed ever so little the
shell is exploded. The petty officer was
blown into atoms. Absolutely nothing
was found of him afterward. Count
Nirod, standing next to him, was
blown to pieces, only one arm being
found afterwai# The two sailors who
stood a little way off from the ex
plosion were badly mangled. Captain
Rudnieff, who stood a little farther
off, was only slightly wounded in the
head by small fragments.
In the old style shells the fragments
of the outer walls and the inner rings
were meant to kill and wound. The
explosive was there merely to burst
the shell and give additional impetus
to the fragments. In the new shells
the explosive itself is meant to kill,
the function of the shell being simply
to convey the explosive to the desired
spot. Referring to the numerous cases
of suppuration of wounds caused by
pieces of clothing entering with frag
ments of shell, Dr. Wada suggests that
every government make it the rule of
the navy that when a figat is expected
every man shall have his body well
washed and his clothes disinfected.
"Happily it is the rule of the men of
our army and navy always to go into
battle in their newest and cleanest
uniforms. This is not because of saiv
ta ry considerations, but it works the
right way all the same."
TRACKLESS RAILWAY.
Novel Litnc Heilig Constructed by
Mannheim Community In Prussia.
United States Consul Lunger, at So
lingen, Germany, reports to the depart
ment of commerce and labor at Wash
ington that a trackless railway is be
ing erected by the community of Mann
heim, which will be the first of its
kind in Prussia. It will run from
Mannheim to Langenfeld, about two
and a half miies, with two short
branches intended for freighting pur
poses.
For entering farm yards lying close
to the road a connector and flexible ca
ble fifty to seventy feet in length will
be used to transmit the current to the
motor car. When these trains pass each
other one will remain standing under
the wires and disconnect ils current
until the other has passed.
Farmers' wagons can be attached to
the end of the train provided the ordi
nary tongues are replaced by shorter
coupling tongues. Five or six double
trips at the rate of eight to ten miles
per hour will be made daily on sched
ule time.
Consul General Cole, at Dresden,
Germany, reports that experiments al
so have been made near Dresden with
railless electric roads, but it seems
that the lines did not prove a marked
success from a financial point of view,
partly because located at points where
the travel was sparse and partly be
cause of the expense in operating.
A .Tiiitaiif.se School Sonjs.
This song is lii'iiiu' sung at the first
j higher school ol' Tokyo, says the St.
! James' Gazette:
Asahi, Shikishima an'l other ships
Kicked the billows of the Yellow sea
And sank the Russian ships.
Lo, the Japan sea is calm and green.
Let us burn Vladivostok.
Let us bury the Russian soldiers in Har
bin.
If we march deep into Siberia
What can Russia do?
Then our glory will rise high,
Then our enmity will be clearer] off.
Our golden people, stand to arms!
Here are swords, our Yamato people.
I "\Ye are the virtuous nation of th'- far
I east.
; Lo, on our Fujiyama the snow is divinely
I white.
se',,
ratii:
?aid
t'lar«
ton.
Notice of Final Proof.
L'nited States Land Office,
Great Falls , Mont., J une 13, iyo4.
)tice is hereby «riven that the following named
ier has filed notice of her intention to make
proof in support of her claim, and that said
>f wii] ] lt . ruiidt' before Chas. 11. Boyle, I". S.
inis>ioner at Iiis otti.e in Fort Benton, Mont.,
S'*ri ;>v, .July 1Mb, 1904, viz: Margaret M.
k. formerly Margaret M. ferny, who made
■>!•'«'! entry No. H'lSft, for til • 8 Va
- NFAi section 17, township £1 north,
-■ names the following witnesses to prove
ontinuons residence upon and cultivation of
land, viz: Ollie Crane, Frank McDonald,
miv tiurlev and Allan Gray, all of Fort Ben
Mont.
J. M. B17 R LIN GAME, Register.
Desert Land—Final Proof.
Ukited States l a n i> Officf. ,
Ghhat Falls , Mont., June 13, 1!K)4.
Notice is hereby given that Madeleine Hansen,
assignee of Abraham Montour, of Chester, Mont,
has filed notice of intention to make proof on
her desert-land claim No. 59HÎ), for the N 1 » SWJ-4,
SE l 4 SWVi, S\\'V4 8EV4 section 3, township 83
north, range 5 east, before Maurice C. Price, I . S.
commissioner, at his office near Hill, Mont., on
Saturday, the 16th day of July, 1904.
Also that Madeleine Hansen, assignee of Bap
tiste Montour, of Chester, Mont., has filed notice
of intention to make proof on her desert-land
claim No, «301, for the SE*£ NW'H, NV£ S\V?£,
SE ^4 SW'Hi section 12, township 34 north, range 4
east.
She names the following witnesses to prove the
complete irrieaton and reclamation of said land:
Donald Cameron, Israel Gagnon, John E. Os
wood and Alfred C. Strode, all of Hill, Mont.
J. M. BURLING AM E, Register.
Notice of Final Proof.
United States Land Office,
Oheat Palls , .Mont., .lime ti, 1904.
Notice is hereby aiven that tlie following named
settler lias tiled notic eof his intention to make
Anal proof in support of his claim, anil that said
proof will be made before Chas. il. Boyle, U. S.
commissioner, at Iiis t.tlicein Fort Hon ton, Mont.,
on Monday, July IS lltO-l, viz.: Alfred Hallbere,
who made homestead entry N"o. 37, for the E' J
S E l 4. SWf 4 SEH, SEVj SWV, section in, town
ship '21 north, range T east.
lie names tii-* following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon and cultivation of s.'iid
land, viz: Peter Tasdall, of Belt, Mont: Olaf
Johnson, Lewis Kelson anil August Ockerman,
of Higlnvood, Mont.
J M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Notice of Fin al Proof.
United States Land Office,
Gkeat Falls . Mont., June 13,1904.
Notice is hereby given that the following named
settlers have tiled notice of their intention to
make iinal proofs in support of their claims, and
that sajd proofs will be made before Maurice O.
Price, !\ S. commissioner, at his ofilce near Hill,
Mont.., on Monday, July 1.8th, 1904, vi/. : Harvey
I). Price, who made homestead entry No.
for lots 5 and *5, SE *4 N \Y, SW^ N Esection
(i, township :U north, range 3 east.
Also Ernest Price, who made homestead entrv
No. 10,'ji)3, for the N y, KWhi section 3, N E\i
SEV4, SK>4 NE*4 section 4, township 30 north,
ran «re 4 east.
Also, Loring Turner, who made homestead pu
try No. 10,20*2, for the SE 1 * N E^ 4 , NK-4 SEV4
section 10, WV« SWV4 section 11, township 30
north, range 4 east.
They name the following witnesses to prove
their continuous residence upon and cultivation of
sakl land, viz: Leonard Stark and William M.
McLaughlin, of Whitlash, Mont.: Edgar Price
and James C. Turner, of Beatrice, Mont.
J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Notice of Final Proof.
L'nited States Land Office,
Gkeat Falls , Mont., June ti, 1S104.
Notice is hereby given that the followingnamed
settler has tiled notice of his intention to make
final proof in support of his claim, and that said
proof will bo made before Chas. H. Boyle, U.
S. commissioner, at his olliee in Fort Benton,
Mont., on Thursday, July 31, Î904, viz: Ernest
S Wright, who made homestead entry No. 13,465
for lots 3 and 4, section 33, township 34 north,
range 8 east ; lot 3, section 5, lots II and 7, section
(i, township 23 north, range 8 east.
He names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon and cultivation of
said land, viz: William Witt, Charles Schilling,
Henry B. Lewis and John Stocking, all of Fort
Benton, Mont.
J. M. UURL1NGAME, Register.
Hotico of Final Proof.
United States Land Office
Gheat Falls , Mont., June ♦>, 11)04.
Notice is hereby given that the followingnamed
settler has tiled notice of his intention to make
final proof in support of his claim, and that said
proof will be made before Chas. II. Boyle, U.
8. commissioner, at his office in Fort Benton,
Mont., on Saturday, July 23, 1904,.viz: Julius
Ernest Zschunke, who made homestead entry
No. 10.1G3, for the NW' l 4 N\VJ£ section 24 E'A
NE section 23, township 21 north, range S east*.
He names the following witnessed to prove Iiis
continuous residence upon and cultivation of said
land, vi/: Stephan Kulage, Robert Klay, John
Connolly and Julius Hart.field, all of Fort Hen
ton, Mont.
J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Notice of Final Proof.
U n i t kd St a t j-: s land o v p i c e
Gjikat Falls , Mont., »June kj, îîm'm.
Notice i.s hereby given that t he following mimed
pettlers have 11 led notice of their intention to
make final proof in support of their claim», and
that said proof will be made before »lohn Mc
Dowell, IT. s. commissioner, at his olliee in Gold
Jiii ire, Mont., on Saturday, July !Md, IDiM, viz :
William Kemble, who made homestead entry No.
10,385, for the &/ 2 SRV 4 , section M'H N R\\ sec
tion 10, township 30 north, raille 3 east.
Also that William Kemble of Whitlneh, Mont.,
has filed notice of intention to make proof on
his d**ert-laud claim No. 5880 for the NE 1 :,,
N Vi SK'.t section 10, township north, range 3
east.
Also that Mary L. Kemble, of Whitlneh, Mont.,
has filed notice of intention to make proof on her
desert-land claim No. for tlie NWl (J , \\'i, 2
NE 1 ^, NW'4 SKVj, N10\ SWlj section 3», town
ship 37 north, ramre 3 east, unsurveyed.
They name the following witnesses to prove
the continuous residence upon ami cultivation of
said homestead and the comp ete irrigation and
reclamation of said desert claims: Murray John
son, David Davidson and Edwnrd Christian, of
Gold liu'.te, Mont.: Hiram F. Smith, of Whit
lash, Mont.
J. M. 1 » I li LING A M f j , L'exister.
Desert Land--Final Proof.
United States Land Office,
Giikat Fai.i >, Mont., June l'.hm.
Notice is hereby '.riven that llilaire Lalîarre, of
Fort Denton, .Mont.., has tiled notice of intention
to make proof on his desert-land claim No. "»ss-j,
for lots I, faction 31, township 27 north, raiiL'e
s east, lot t, section 3, lots 1, ~\ 3, section J, town
ship xîti north, range sea>t, before(.' luis. II. Doyle,
T'.S. Commissioner, at his olllce at Fort Denton,
Mont., on Saturday, the 23d day of .July, DJ04.
He names the following witnesses to prove tlie
complet» irrigation and reclamation of said land:
Alfred LaDarre, Matthew lirum», Archilas Hes
selte and Robert Nelson, .\11 of Fort Denton,
Mont. J. M. DU KLINGA M E, Kelter.
Desert Land—Final Proof.
i'.mtkd S tatus L and U pfick,
Ur.KAT F ai.i.s , Mont., .lime 13, 1 !HH.
Nolic" is hereby yivon that .lohn H. I.azure,
of Fort lii'nton. .Montana, lias filed notice of in
tention to make proof on lus desert land claim
No. 5S8S, for lots 3, 5, « and », tin* SW, .NE U sec
tion i'ti, lot 10, section 'JV, townehipü'.i north, ran^e
s east, before Chus. II. lioyle, I', s. commission
er, at his olliee at Fort Benton, Mont., on Tues
day, the JCtli day of July, l'.iui.
lie nami's tin' following witnesses to prove tie*
complete irrigation and reclamation of said land:
C'liarle.- llrinkman and Edward Harris, of Ma
ria-, Mont: .Mary li. ha/.tire and Delia Yeilleanx,
of Fort Benton, Mont.
•>. M. BUiUNGAMK Register.
Notice of Final Proof.
("mtkij States Land Office,
UitKAT F.u.i.-, .Mont., .June aV, l'.Mi :.
N is hereby L'iven that the t olio wine n h med
•"ettie: - ave tiled notice of their intention to
make rina; proof in support of their claims, and
that sa:o proof will lie made before UeL'ister
and li iver at I". S. land otlice. Great Fall
M 1 'tit., I.n July 30th, l'.ml, viz: William I\ Tur
ner, >r who made homestead enttv So. T5o3 f..r
the >!■;'•.. s\V«4, S\V«.J SE'.i, section 15, SW>.,
lots 3, I, section township 3Hnorth,
AÎ : o William I'. Turner, Jr., who made ho:ne
rteaii entry .No. Î.1U1, tor lots -J, 3, section
NI-.-.i .Nt'4, lots 1, s, it, - ction township -vi
north, ran.e 3 east.
Alru I.aura I homas, w ho made home-te-id
e':tr. lor the W|.; SWi,. lot 1. secth. h
•j:i, h;t- Ij, ., Ill, section township 3o nouh,
ran3 ea>t.
Tn-'y name the following witnesses to prove
their continuous residence upon andcitliivatton
of said lands, viv: \\ illiam P. Turner, Jr.. :'.• t*■
Grant. Ilenry W. Hoffman, James K Cin-tri'f
1. !.ri Themas, all of Galata. Mont
•I. M. Bl'ItLISGAME, Re iris:
Notice of Final Proof.
United States Land Office
(-rueat Falls , Mont., June 20, 1904.
Notice is hereby given that the followingnamed
settler has tiled notice of his intention to make
Qnal proof in support of his claim, and that said
proof will be made before Jeremiah Sullivan U.
S. commissioner, at his office at Fort Benton,
Mont., on Wednesday, July 27, 1904, viz: Ilenry
c. Reichers, who made "homestead entry No.
10349, for the NWHi, section 3*2, township 24
north, range 7 east.
lie names the following witnesses to prove
his continuous residence "upon and cultivation
of said land, viz: Frank McDonald, John W.
Smith, John Stocking. George L. King, *11 of
Fort Denton. Montana.
J. M. B URLIN G AME , Register.
Desert Land--Final Proof.
United States Land Office,
Great Falls , Mont., June 27, 1904.
Notice is hereby given that Benjamin II. Man
deville, of Fort Benton, Mont., has tiled notice of
intention to make proof on his desert-land claim
No. 5803, for NW^, section 15, township 20
north, range 10 east, before Chas. II Boyle, U.
S. commissioner at his office in Fort Benton,
Mont., on Thursday the 28th day of July, 1904.
He names the following witnesses to prove the
complete irrigation and reclamation of said land:
Louis I). Sharp, Charles Lepley, Isaac Postill,
Aniericus L. Morrill, all of Fort Benton, Mont.
J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Desert Land—Final Proof.
I'nitkd States Land Offick,
Oheat Falls , Mont., June 13,1901.
Notice is hereby given that Casper Noble, of
West Butte, Mont., has tiled notice of intention
to make proof on his desert-land claim No. 5933,
for the NEKt SWKi, N;4 SËH section I, township
3(j north, range 1 east, lot (i, section li, townsnip
31) north, range 3 east, betöre John McDowell, U.
8. commissioner, at his otlice in Gold Butte,
Mont., on Saturday, the 30th day of July, 1904.
He names the following witnesses to prove the
complete irrigation and reclamation of said lar.d :
Fred II. Noble, Ilenry Clay Gaines, Albert D.
Pratt and Harry Teed, all of West Butte, Mont.
J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Desert Land—Final Proof.
United States Land Office
Great Falls , Mont., June 27, 1904.
Notice is hereby given that «Joshua Brown of
Gold Butte, Montana, has tiled notice of intention
to make proof on his desert-land claim No. 7789,
for the S l 2 NWJ-4, N# SWfc, section 13, town
ship 37 north, ran ire 3 east, unsurveyed, before
«lohn McDowell, I'.S. Commissioner, at his office
in Gold Butte, Montana, on Saturday, the 30th
day of J uly, 1904.
lie names the following witnesses to prove the
complete irrigation and reclamation ot said'and:
Andrew J. Blevins, Murray Johnson, «lohn
Fromm, Robert Johnson, all of Whitlash, Mont.
J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Notice of Final Proof.
United States Land Office,
G uk at Fa i Ls, Mont., .1 une *-27, 1904.
Notice is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his fntention to make
final proof in support of his claim, and that said
proof will be made before Register and Re
ceiver V. S. Land Office at Great Falls. Mont on
Thursday, August 4th, 1901, viz: Frederick W.
Simero, who made homestead entry No. 8827,
for loi. -, S W *4 NE*-4, Nj-2 S K %, section 5, town
ship 30 north, range 1 east.
He names the following witnesses to prove
the complete irrigation and reclamation of said
land: Henry C. Gains, Ferdinand Gains, Sam
uel Palmer, all of West But e, Mont , Albert
Geoddertz, of Sweet Grase, Mont.
J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
Desert Land—Final Proof.
United States Land Office,
Gkeat Kali.s , Mont.. Juno 27. 1904.
Notice is lierei.y given that Geovue Crain, of
Gold IJutte, Mont., has tiled notice of intention
to make proof on his desert-land claim No. 6494,
for lot 4, section li, township 36 north, rangea
east: WV4 SWJ4, S\V 1 , 1 NWHi, section 81, town
ship 37 north, range il east, unsurveyed.
Also that Margaret Christian, of Gold Butte,
Mont., has filed notice of intention to make
proof on her desert-laud claim No. 5925, for the
SE ^4 SK?;i, section 6, NK'-i NKy, section 7,
NWJi ,N '4 SWVi, section S, township 36 north,
range 3 east, before .1 ohn McDowell, U. S. com
missioner, at his olllce in Gold Butte, Mont.,
on Saturday, the 13th clay of August, 1904.
They name the following witnesses to prove
the complete irrigation and reclamation of said
land: William K. Kent, Robert Christian, Ar
thur Harbock, Arthur II. Few all of Gold Unite,
Mont. J. M. BURLINGAME, Register.
:
:,,
3
2
of
to
-vi
h
See ....
JOHN SENIEUR
About that room you
want papered. Call
ami see the latest style
of
Wall Paper, Mouldings, Etc.
To Horse Owners
The Registeted Percheron
Stallion
CENTAUF
Weight, 1 ,!S0U pou mis.
Will make Hie season at 1*1. S.
Molderbaum's Ranch, four miles
east of Fort Benton.
CENTAUR. 23482.
I.'evistered in the IVrcheroii Stud IS ok
America by Kotiert Haru'ess Son, of Winona,
111.
Color—Dark (.rray: -tripe in face.
Foaled May 1 iw.ts : eol. by l'ortlios 73!)I (cele
brated Brilliant familv i : 1st dam, Adelaine 5th,
13*1,', by Brilliant 737!); id dam, Imp. Adelaine
3d 7371 i 111!) 13), by Cheri <"»l<>4 : 3d dam, Bijou
1537S i by Papillon owned by M. Mitean: Ith dam,
I.izette, by Selim (71!)).
DR. GEO. H. TAYLOR,
DENTIST.
Fort Benton, Mont.
( inii-f located in Stockmen'.- National
Bank Builtliiij.'-.
1 'hone '•) F.
T11K ENTERPRISE
RESTAURANT.
1.1:1': GL. & BR0., Priprietors.
'Front Street - Fort Benton
J # B. LONG & CO.,
Opposite Park Hotel,
Great Falls, Mont.
We Sell....
SHEARING
MACHINES.
Write us for prices on any sizejl Plant.
We Sell SHEEP AND CATTLE.
List your Stock with us.
REDENBACK SHEARING
COMPANY
Harlem, - - Montana.
SHEEPMEN ATTENTION!
We have the best plant in the State
of Montana for the accommodation of
trail sheep. We are located on your
route east, elegant range, plenty of
good spring water, good roads to the
railroad tracks and teams to haul
your wool at a reasonable price.
We solicit your work and would be
glad to correspond with you.
AUDK ESS
REDENBACK SHEARING CO.,
HARLEM, MONTANA.
NOTICE
The Manchester Cooperative
Woolen Mills will be ready
for work July 15
We invite small shipments of. wool
from sheep raisers, to be made into
blankets, skirtings, llannels, etc., for
your own use.
We will buy good buck wool at 15c.
per pound, payable half cash and half
in Woolen Mill shares at $12.f)0 each.
As eastern buyers only take buck wool
at half price, it will pay you to ship
your buck wool to us.
We are ready to take more desert
tilings from residents of Montana who
will take $100.00 stock in our Woolen
Mill.
nANCHESTER
Co - Operative Woolen
HILL COHPANY,
Great Palls, - - flontana.
GEORGE L. OVERFIELD.
Cattle brand as
shown on cut; alao
J. on left hip only;
KU and R-C 011 the
right ribs.
^Increase branded
c? on left ribs or
tli ifjh from fall
of 1894.
liar murk, over
lopti in left and
split in right.
Vent, 1 on the left shoulder. Horses branded
K on left shoulder. Klinge, Shonkin atul Arrow
creek. 1'. (.), address, Fort, Benton.
MILNER CATTLE CO.
M. K. Mu, neu , I'res. and Manager, Fort Benton.
Montana.'
Main brands h
showD in the ac
companying cut*.
Also own all
cattle bearing the
single "square'
t brand, and all
rebranded cattle
bearing only the
croHH P.
AIho own brand
on right hip callec
"square S."
Runge from Bear
1'aw mountains east
ward to Fort Perk
between the Milk an g
Missouri rivers. Also
south of tlie Mis
souri river, between
Arrow creek and Bell
creek, Önonkin ram e
11 l'jN RI KTTE VALLEAUX.
Horse brand h » show n
on left shonlder.
Cattle branded NV on
left aide and hip and
also on right side.
Vent, Att hip
Hange, Teton.
P. O .n Fort Beniov
CLAUS PRTERS,
Licensed Embalmer
a » d Undertaker.
Bond Street, : : Fort Benton
JOHN ROOS.
CITY
SCAVENGER.
Will rati a Job Wairon aiul du all
kinds of haulino'.
Orders f\\ Mail Receive Prompt Attention.
Fort Benton, Hont.
Fine Book and .lob Printing a spe
cialtv at the River Press office.

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