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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, July 13, 1904, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053157/1904-07-13/ed-1/seq-8/

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The Open Shop
And
arryasis
By SAMUEL GOMPERS. President
American federation of Labor
m
KAUE unionism is attacked today more bitterly than
ever before. There is this to be said, however: In
the early days ALL CLASSES were arrayed against
us. Today we have to contend with only a small and
evil souled remnant.
In the days of our youth men who were not sat
isfied with wages and met to discuss means of bettering their condi
tion were CONSPIRATORS AND OUTLAWS. They buried
the records of their meetings and planned for freedom in the depths
of forests.
One who ran away from ill paid or degraded toil and was cap
tured was branded with a white hot iron with the letter "V" for
villain or vagabond. If he ran away and was caught a second time
he was branded with "S," for slave. For a third offense he was
HANGED.
It is well to know the history of this movement to realize the
valleys of tears that have been traversed, the myriad sacrifices that,
have been made, the lives that have been given up for tiie progress
whose fruits we enjoy.
WE FACE TODAY A CONCENTRATION CF CAPITAL AND A DIS
EASE OF CAPITAL WHICH I MAY CALL PARRYASIS.
There was harmony between employers and employed until the
silly movement to bring about what Parryized capitalists call the
OPE X shop, but which is really the NONUNION shop, raised its
head. Philadelphia workirigmen agreed this year with their em
ployers upon questions of hours and labor conditions. The ques
tion of wages was no obstacle.
1 hoy were content to have a member of the Builders' Exchange
as an umpire in disputes. They wore willing to sign an agreement
which would' do away with the sympathetic strike, but they de
manded, and the Parryized employers refused, THE PRINCIPLE
OK THE UNION SIIOP.
. I Low inconsistent! What agreement would be binding in a non
union shop? \\ hat would be the sense of a union making an agree
ment with an employer who could and would Cliineeize the estab
lishment WHENEVER IIE PLEASED ?
THE SO CALLED OPEN SHOP MEANS A NONUNION SHOP. 11
IS THE VEHICLE OF THE HYPOCRITICAL EMPLOYER WHO PRE
TENDS FAIRNESS FOR LABOR, BUT WHO HAS HIS DAGGER HID
DEN IN HIS SLEEVE. I WOULD MUCH RATHER DEAL WITH AN
OUTSPOKEN ANTIUNIONIST THAN WITH ONE OF THESE HYPO
CRITES.
1 am IRREVOCABLY opposed to the principle of the sym
pathetic strike. It hurts the cause of labor. But 1 am more heartily
against the nonunion shop, and to thwart the capitalists who are
striving for that end I would resort to ANY LEGAL means, in
cluding the unsparing use of the sympathetic strike.
The small souled persons who are trying to turn back the clock
of labor's progress arc engaged in an impossible task. You cannot
teach a man the alphabet and then prevent him from framing the
words Man, God, Liberty.
Hie spirituality of generations of sufferers, the weight of millions
of toilers and citizens are back of this movement for the UNION
shop. Men are not going back to chains, to the sixteen hour day, to
nonunionism, division of effort and »SLAVERY.
WE REALIZE THE FORCE OF WHAT JOHN HANCOCK SAID IN
INDEPENDENCE HALL, "WE MUST HANG TOGETHER OR WE WILL
HANG SEPARATELY."
Arbitration Should Be
Prompted by Justice
And Humanity
By NELSON A.
MILES. Lieutenant
General U. S. A.
(R-etiredl
KBIT RATION is not altogether commendable for the
powerful. There is no particular credit resorting to
arbitration WHEN BOTH PARTIES ARE
A ERA I D OR EQUALLY MATCHED and fearing
that their countries may be overrun, devastated or
impoverished.
THE MOST COMMENDABLE THF.ORY OF ARBITRATION IS THAT
OF THE HIGH SENSE OF HONOR AND JUSTICE AND HUMANITY.
It is far more commendable for a powerful nation to lay aside
for the tune being its great power and intiuenee and say to the weak,
the helpless, Wo will adjust our differences AS BETWEEN M EN,
and we will be governed by a high sense of honor and pistiee. That
is commendable, that is grand and glorious, and I trust that not
onlj this proposed arbitration treaty with Great Britain that is being
ad\ anced and urged will be adopted, but 1 trust it will be the
stepping stone, the example, to ALL NATIONS of the world to
unite in a better consideration and a better understanding and a
better settlement of the differences that divido thorn. MEN are
accustomed to resort to the civil courts or courts of arbitration to
settle their differences.
WHY SHOULD NOT GOVERNMENTS, THAT ARE THE CREATION,
THE TOLERATION OF MEN, BE GOVERNED BV THE SAME RULE,
MORE OR LESS, THAT GOVERNS INDIVIDUALS?
Highest Types of American Life
By HAMILTON W. M ABIE. Editor and Essayist
to give the HIGHEST type
MtATlHOM would we name, is a
M of American life? Not the great leaders of commercial life,
™ l,ut the PIONEERS of the west, men of the old south,
sturdy New Englanders. Our idealism wenbl not pick THE
GREAT INDUSTRIAL CENTERS of our country as the thin
to be most proud of, but would name Niagara falls, the Yosemite
Valley, the Yellowstone park. We are idealists.
MONTANA BEIEFLETS.
SHORT ITEMS OF NEWS FROM ALL
OVER Till: STATE.
« hat lias Happened in Montana Durinj
the Past Few Days.
Anaconda , July T.—The biggest
holdup which has occurred in Ana
conda in some time was reported to
have occurred at about 11 o'clock to
night when Andy Mandoli's saloon
was entered by three men. Mr. Man
doli stated that about $600 in cash and
$400 or $000 in jewelry was taken from
him. He said that he believed them
to be Anaconda people as they ap
peared to be familiar with the place.
Butte , July 7.—The police depart
ment has evidence that certain of the
saloon and highway robberies report
ed recently never occurred and that
unscrupulous persons are taking ad
vantage of the invasion of thugs to
report crimes that were never com
mitted, in order to cover up their owb
shortcomings. It is said that in one
case a man reported that the saloon
in which he was tending bar, was held
up and robbed and that it has since
developed the bartender was gambling
heavily the afternoon of the reported
robbery and probably lost all he had.
It is the theory of the police that he
claimed to have been held up to shield
his losses.
Helena , July 7. —The apple crop of
Montana will be short this year.
Quality, however, will be excellent,
and prices good. This is the state
ment of E. N. Brandegee, president of
the state board of horticulture. Mr.
Brandegee also stated that with the
exception of Michigan, the apple crop
will be short in all the states from
which Montana draws her supply.
Light crops are reported in Washing
ton, Oregon and California. Last
year Montana had a full apple crop,
while it is not expected that it will
run much more than 60 per cent this
eason.
Red Lodge , July 7. —Buying human
skin by the inch was the novel experi
ence of a Carbon county rancher.
Andrew Nerlin, of Joliet, has just re
turned from Chicago, where his young
daughter had the operation of graft
• skin upon two large wounds on
her -body successfully performed at
the Norwegian Deaconess hospital.
The child was burned in afire a couple
of years ago, and her wounds refused
to heal. First the father gave a lot
of his skin from his arms. Then he
purchased forty inches from a young
man at ihe hospital, paying two dol
lars a running inch for it. The girl
limps somewhat, but otherwise is quite
well.
Butte , July 8.— Shortly after noon
today Chief of Police Mulholland re
ceived a telegram from Plattsburg,
Mo., instructing him to arrest War
ren Estes, alias Robert Blue, wanted
there for murder, and 15 minutes after
receiving the telegram the man wanted
was behind the bars in the city jail.
Estes is a negro and was engaged in
blacking boots at a stand in tb'e city
hall alley near East Park street when
the chief and Detective .ferry Murphy
walked up and placed him under ar
rest.
Helena , June 8.—Attorney C. F.
Kellev, for County Commissioner W.
D. Clark, appeared before the supreme
court this morning and asked for a
writ of prohibition against Judge W.
E. I-Iarney. The writ was granted and
the hearing was set for September 24.
In the meautime all proceedings in
connection with grand jury indict
ments of Mr. Clark are brought to a
taudstill.
Cheat Falls , July 8.—On the
charge of criminal assault, Frank
Cooper, until recently a resident of
Belt, was arrested at Geyser on a
warrant issued out of Justice Pes
combe's court at Belt, at the instance
of the 12-year-old daughter ot Har
rison DocUery, who alleged that she
was the victim of the assault. Cooper
was arraigned at Belt, and on deposit
r bail in the sum of $150 was re
leased. Iiis hearing has been fixed
for Tuesday of next week.
Missoula , July 8.—Deputy Game
Warden A. E. Higgins returned last
night from Hamilton, where yesterday
he conducted the case against E. F.
Gladding of New York, who is
charged with killing deer out of sea
son. Gladding was arraigned before
Justice Morris, and waiving examina
tion, was bound over to the district
court, his bond being fixed at 8250,
which he furnished. It is believed
that Gladdiug does not intend to light
the case, but will forfeit his bail.
Miles City , July !>.— A burglary,
in which the robbers overlooked a
great opportunity, took place at Terry
Thursday night. J.W Stith's hard
ware store and the store at the post
otlice were entered and from the first
place I s razors and many pocket
knives were taken, and from the latter
a dozen knives and a gold watch
valued at about $2.">. The robber:
missed a grip which was ou the eouu
ter iu Mr. Stith's place which con
tained $4,000 jn cash.
Helena . July it.—Judge E. K.
Cheadle. of Lewistown, will preside
during the next trial of the Gravelle
case. At the morning session of the
m
Uf
Vi
jy
\ !1
FIBROID TUMORS CURED.
Mrs. Hayes' First Letter Appeal
ing to Mrs. Pinkliam for Help :
" D ear M us. P inkham : —I have been
under Boston doctors' treatment for a
long time without any relief. They
tell me I have a fibroid tumor. I can
not sit down without great pain, and
the soreness extends up my spine. I
have bearing-down pains both back
and front. My abdomen is swollen,
and I have had flowing spells for three
years. My appetite is not good. I can
not walk or be on my feet for any
length of time.
"The symptoms of Fibroid Tumor
given in your little book accurately
describe my case, so I write to you for
advice." — (Signed) Mrs. E. F. Hates,
252 Dudley St. (Roxbury), Boston, Mass.
Mrs. Hayes' Second Letter :
"D ear M rs. P inkham :—Sometime
ago I wrote to you describing my symp
toms and asked your advice. You re
plied, and I followed all your direc
tions carefully, and to-day I am a well
woman.
" The use of Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound entirely ex
pelled the tumor and strengthened my
whole system. I can walk miles now.
"Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege
table Compound is worth five dol
lars a drop. I advise all women who
are afflicted with tumors or female
trouble of any kind to give it a faithful
trial." — (Signed) Mrs. E. F. Hayes,
252 Dudley St. (Roxbury), Boston, Mass.
— $5000 forfeit if original of abous leiten • c roiling
genuineness cannot be produced
court,, Judge Smith auuounoed that he
had extended an invitation to Judge
Cheadle to come to Helena and preside
during the trial. Gravelle will be
tried for the third time Aug. 6. It is
expected that he will be tried on the
charge of robbing the Holter Hard
ware company powder house, the jury
having disagreed in the trial of the
case last month.
Butte , July 10.—Official informa
tion was received yesterday by the
Butte clergy of the Catholic church of
the appointment of Rev. Father B. C.
Lenitian to be bishop of the diocese of
Great Falls. Father Lenihan has
been pastor of the Corpus Christi
church at Fort Dodge, Iowa. He is
vicar general of the Sioux City dio
cese aud a cousin of the late Very
Rev. Thomas Leuihan, who was ap
pointed bishop of Cheyenne.
Butte , July 11.—Prominent millers
of the state met in Butte today to dis
cuss matters of mutual interest in re
lation to the fall wheat crop. The gen
tlemen denied the soft impeachmeut
that they were forming a trust to fix
the price to be paid for the wheat
crop, but it is understood they reached
an agreement as to what price would
be offered for certain grades.
Miles City , July 11.—Sergeant
Banks, who was tried in the district
court on a charge of assault in the
first degree, was found guilty Satur
day in the third degree and the jury
gave him 20 days iu jail. His com
panion, O. I). Porter, who was tried
on the same charge and acquitted,
was sent up for 60 days by Judge
Loud for contempt, appearing in the
court room drunk when summoned as
a witness.
Gueat Falls , July 11.—John Fo
garty. a switchman in the employ of
the Montana Central, met almost in
stant death iu the yards here yester
day while engaged in the act of un
coupling two cars. His foot caught
iu the frog of a switch aud he was run
down by the car before he had time to
extricate himself. The accident was
witnessed by several members of the
train crew, but they were powerless to
help him.
~THE
BOSTON STORE
Fort Benton.
This is our last month in Fort Bon
ton. so in order to move goods as lit
tle as possible, we offer everything in
our line a good deal below our former
low prices. And as a further induce
ment we offer to purchasers of So.00
or more
A Discount of 33 1-3 Per Cent.
of our former low prices. This is a
good opportunity tu lay in a supply
of all kind.- of
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING
and SHOES
at less than wholesale cost.
WILL YOU NEED...
A MOWER,
BINDER, or
HAY RAKE?
IF 50, BUY THE BEST! The MILWAUKEE
justly claims this proud distinction. We carry
the Chain Drive flower in 5 -ft., 6 -ft. and 7 =ft.
cut. Also the Milwaukee Steel Junior No. 10.
THE BINDER THAT NEVER
DISAPPOINTS.
Also the Milwaukee Steel Rakes in all widths.
Repairs for these machines are seldom wanted
but we have them always on hand.
COME AND SEE THESE HACHINES. A glance
will show their superiority over all others.
....WE PAY TOP PRICES FOR SHIPHENTS OF....
I™ Sheep Pelts and Pulled Wool,
HIDES, ETC.
McfllLLAN FUR & WOOL CO.,
200-ÎÎ12 First Ave. North,
MINNEAPOLIS. ; : MINNESOTA
Ouiek CAîS11 Returns
AVrite Tor Circulars'«
J-JAVINQ REOPENED my Drug
Business in Fort Benton, I would
respectfully solicit a share of your
patronage
FRESH DRUGS
AND MODERATE PRICES
GUARANTEED.
^Ù 3
W. J. MINAR,
FORT BENTON,
Opposite Grand Union
Hotel «
MONT.
The New HODGE MOWER, Hay Rake
and Special Alfalfa Rake
Manufactured by the Acme Manufacturing
Co., Peoria, Illinois.
Call and Examine Before Purchasing.
THE AERMCTOR,
The best wind machine on earth. A3! steel der
rick. Both wheel and derrick galvanized
and therefore indestructible.
W 0, DEXTER, Agent. Fort f enter, I ont,
Correnoot J 'if>n; , <a solicited Seed for catalogue arc rmcs-s
The New Overland
HOTEL,
FRANK McDONALD, Prop'r.
First-class service. Central location.
Hot aud cold baths.
Furnace heat. Electric lights.
SS" Kates : SI."J5 and 81.50 per day.
st . oo per week.
[FRONT STREET. FORT BENTON
Tel, - M. V. O. Bo:; ltiT.
J B. LONG & CO.,
Opposite Park Hotel,
Great Falls, Moat
We have customers for
several bands of sheep.
*
List your sheep with
us and we will send vou
la customer.
Fine Book and Job Printing ;
ciaitv at the RlVEK Pl'F.aS Office.

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