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The river press. [volume] (Fort Benton, Mont.) 1880-current, December 04, 1912, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053157/1912-12-04/ed-1/seq-6/

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Col. Roosevelt's Assassin, His
Surgeon and Stenographer
»«♦♦« ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•• •—
JOHN SCHRÄNK, the assassin of
Theodore Koosevelt. is a short
stubby man with a calm face,
inoffensive, shrinking manner.
Who at times in connection with mat
ters over which he brooded deeply be
trayed traces of insanity, which affect
ed his father and his grandfather, John
Schrank 1st, a brewer of Erding, Bava
ria. He is thirty-six years old.
Schrank is a morbid man and not a
Socialist He had no intimates except
bis relatives. He was educated in the
public schools and speaks English as
well as German. He came to this coun
try to live in New York with his uncle
and auut after the death of his father
and mother, the father having died the
death of a maniac.
Several times in his life Schrank has
shown indications which mark him as
one mentally affected. He was violent
at his aunt's funeral in Brooklyn. For
-3
; «j
3
0 1912, by American Press Association.
JOHN SCHRANK.
days he returned to the grave, weeping
and mourning, covering the spot with
flowers.
The force of Scbrank's irrational mind
began to direct itself against Colonel
Roosevelt some time ago. It is plain
that for several months he had been
resolving plans for slaying Koosevelt.
He followed the colonel to many cities,
but failed to set an opportunity to (ice
bis bullet until Milwaukee was reached.
In a confession of his crime Schrank
said lie had looked upon Roosevelt's
plan to start a third party as a danger
to the country and finally decided that
it was bis duty to kill the former presi
dent. He told of a dream in which
u
n
1 VS
ft
$
!
Photo by American Press Association.
UEBC'l* HOSPITAL, CHICAGO; l'.OOSEVELT'S
ltOO-M INDICATED DÏ CROSSES.
the late President McKinley appeared
before hiiu and told him that Roosevelt
had killed him so that he might be
come president.
Elbert E. Martin, Roosevelt's ste
nographer, is credited with having pre
vented Schrank from firing a second
shot. Martin is twenty-nine years old
and a native of Manchester, Vt. He
got a position at the New York Pro
gressive headquarters in August and
soon afterward became Mr. Roosevelt's
personal stenographer. lie Is not only
an expert stenographer, but a lawyer.
Martin had one foot on the sidewalk
and the other on the running board of
Roosevelt's automobile when Schrank
flred. Martin went clear across the
Intervening space in one leap, caught
the assassin, threw his right arm
around the man's neck and bore him to
the pavement. Schrank's iieck was in
danger of being broken by Martin's
half nelson hold when Colonel Roose
velt called out. "Don't hurt him; bring
him to me."
Martin dragged the fellow along,
banded the revolver to the colonel and
tben twisted the man's face arouud
so that the colonel could see him. By
this time the police had got up, and
Martin turned the assassin over to
them.
After having received first aid treat
ment at Milwaukee Colonel Roosevelt
m
y - •
Fhoto by American Press Association.
DR. JOHN B. UUliPHY.
was removed to Mercy hospital, Chi
eago, where he was attended by sov
eral noted physicans. Heading the
Ust was Dr. .lohn B. Murphy, one of
the most prominent surgeons in the
world. It was l)r. Murphy who in
ft
by American Press Association
THE PISTOL.
tented the perfected "Murphy button"
now used in Intestinal surgery the
World over and acknowledged by sur
geons to be one of the most important
additions to surgical science. The
Murpliy button is a contrivance for
y%
mm
» ^ s*
ELBEitT E. M A KT IN.
holding together the severed ends of
Intestines and allowing them to do
their work while healing from the
wound> >>f the surgeon's ki.ife. Whei
nature has c mp 'eted the heaiiiig proc
ess the Murphy button is absorbed Into
the system and passes away.
' SELF HEALING TIRE.
Éubber Inner Tube That Holds Air
After Being Punctured.
A Dew form of Inner tube which has
recently been placed on the market is
Well worthy of consideration as seem
ingly representing an important step
In the right direction.
This tube contains uo tiller, no
"dope' of uu.t kind, but is a regular
pneumatic rube intlaied with air In the
usual way. which, owing to some pe
culiar and iimciilons features in
its coiiMnicUon. I* m a large mens
ure seit m 'ji. iii - hihi will Hold the air
for a io:i„' :iiitc. .1 is claimed, even
after iv« «•> i '.' a ven severe puncture.
Tile priii. ii ic on winch the construc
tion o! I in« lire Is I ,ii -te d can nest he
explained in reference to our illustra
tious. I lie innei Iniw is made rattier
heavy at the tread tin.: has Iiulittlded
In it a strip ot canvas seen in section
in rig. I. which represents the ap
pearance of the tube when first made.
We now come to (tie important feature
of the new tube. After a length ot
tubing has been made as usual and
with the structure shown in Fig. 1
the tube Is now turned inside out. An
inspection of Fig. 1 will show that the
canvas strip, forming as it does an arc
of the inner circumference of the tube
r ig. &
Fig. 2.
Fig. L
wimrrme
ciosep
Fig. 4.
SELF HEALING AUTO TIRE.
as first made, is necessarily shorter
than the corresponding arc of the outer
circumference of the tube. The conse
quence of this is that when the tube
is turned inside out the canvas strip
is under tensiou, and. being inelastic
and therefore unable to give way to
this tension, it holds the deflated tire in
a flat position, as shown in Fig. 2. On
inflation the tire is, of course, forced
to assume a circular form, aud the
canvas strip, being now situated on the
external circumference and being, as
already pointed out, iuextensible, com
presses the rubber underneath it. so
that the tread portion of the inner
tube is always under compression and
therefore self sealing. In point of fact,
a puncture made with a sharp nail or
point seals itself automatically, so that
it cannot be detected by the usual
immersion in water.
The diagram of Fig. 4 is intended to
show roughly the way in which the
rubber behaves when a puncture is
made. The nail on the left is shown
in its entering position, when it drags
the Ober of the rubber with it and
raises a tuft of rubber on the inside
of the tube. The nail on the right is
being withdrawn, and the fiber of the
rubber is following in its motion. On
the extreme right is seen a puncture
sealed by the rubber after the uail has
been extracted.
Dictograph's Wide Range.
K. M. Turner, inventor of the dicto
graph, which he says has been mis
spelled dictagraph, gave a demonstra
tion of the various ways in which the
device could be practically utilized in
New York recently.
"The dictograph," explained the in
ventor, "has been known as a detective
device. This is the first public demon
stration of its everyday commercial
importance. With our commercial de
vice a business man simply lifts a lever
and talks to one, two, fifteen or a bun
dred people, as he chooses, at one time
Each party to the conversation is seat
ed in his own office, which may be in
the saine building or several blocks
away. Nobody is obliged to hold
transmitter or receiver. They talk back
and forth as though seated in the same
room. The detective value of the de
vice consists of the fact that the trans
mitter weighs only six ounces and cau
be concealed easily. It can be installed
in four minutes by an expert and can
be wired so as to transmit spoken
words for more than a mile."
A Great Fuel Consumer.
More fuel is consumed in the city of
Pittsburgh and its immediate vicinity
and more coal is shipped to and
through the Pittsburgh district than
in any other district In the world, ac
cording to Edward W. Parker of the
United States geological survey. With
a population of about one-ninth of that
of Greater New York the consumption
of coal alone In Pittsburgh Is nearly
equal to that of the much larger city
Greater New York consumed In 1911
approximately 19,000,000 short tons,
and Pittsburgh used about 10,500,000
short tons. But Pittsburgh consumes
several million tons of coke and con
slderable quantities of natural gas
which, added to the coal consumption
gives that city a good lead over New
York as a fuel consumer.
Economical Reflectors.
Reflectors that may be attached to
any electric light, called asymmetrlca
reflectors, may now be obtained
Their purpose is to throw the bulk of
the light from the lamp in one direc
tion. They are especially useful In
illuminating long halls, for throwing
light into closets, in the bathroom for
shaving or wherever more light Is
needed In a certain spot. Where such
reflectors are employed a smaller lamp
may be used, thus cutting down the
cost of current.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
Federal.
mm alors Joe. M. Dixon Henry L. Myers,
Representative in Congress Charles N. Pray
C. S. District Judge Geo. M. Bonrquin
C. 8. District Attorney Ju. W. Freeman
U. 3. Marshal William Lindsay
Surveyor General J. u. Locke
Collector of Customs John G. Batr
U. 8. Land Offlce, Great Falls
Register, Jnlins C. Peters. Receiver, J. W.
Roberts.
U. 8. Land Office, Havre—
Register, M. w. Hutchinson. Receiver. L. W.
Pierson.
State
Governor Kdwin L. Norrli
Lieutenant Governor W. R. AUen
Secretary of State T. M. Bwlndlehuret
State Treasurer K. K. Eseelstyn
State Auditor C. M. McCoy
Attorney General Albert J Galen
Sunt. Public Instruction W. S. Harmon
Chief Justice Sup. Court Theo. Brantlv
Associate Justice Henry C. Smith
.....W. L. Hollow«}
Clerk Supreme Court John T. Athey
Railroad Commissioner B. T. Stanton
Dan Boyle
B. A. Morley
CountT.
State Senator Thos. M. Everett
Representative A. H. Reter
" H. F. Schwartz
District Judge John W. Tattan
" Frank N. Utter
Sheriff George Bickle
Treasurer William R. Leet
Clerk of District Court Chas. H. Boyle
J. Lee Sedgwick
Clerk and Recorder..
County Auditor
Assessor...
E. Frank Sayrc
Philip Bnckh
County Attorney B.L.Powers
Supt. of Schools Daisy I. Blackstone
Coroner W. F. Wilford
Public Administrator W. O. Dexter
County Surveyor A. W. Merrlfleld
County Commissioners. 2 yrs G. L. Overfleld
" 4 yrs H. J. Wackerlin
" 6 vrs Jno. V. Carroll
City of Fort Benton.
Mayor Ohas. H. Green
City Treasurer F. A. Flanagan
Police Magistrate William Kinder
City Clerk Jolin F. Murphy
Marshal M. Maloney
Board of Aldermen:
Jos. S. Brown Jere Sullivan, Jr.
A.J. Schmidt S. F. Allen
W. K. Harber Charles Lepley
A:
BSNTON LODGE NO. at., A. F. ANi
A. M.—Regular communications of the
above named lodge a re held at 7 :S0 p.m.
on the drst and third Mondays of each
month. Members o f sister Lodges and sojourning
brethren arecordially invltedto attend.
JAKE RITTER, W. M.
J. N. C hesnutt , Bec 'y.
, BENTON LODOK, No. 56,
I. O. O. F.
Meets every Wednesdaj
'ening at Odd Fellows'hall. Visiting roemben
•e cordially invited to attend.
J. C. MYERS, N. G.
A rnold W estpai.l , Sec.
£)RS. PORTER & HOUTZ,
Physicians and 5urgeons
Office : Cor. Bond and Main St.
Office hours, 3 to 5 p. m.
qr. james f. riURPHY ,
Physician and Surgeon
Office over Benton State Bank
Office Honrs—2 to 5 and T to 8 p. m.
Fort Benton. - lion
£)r. c. b. hamilton
DENTIST
Offices over Lockwood's Drug Store
F ort B enton , M ont .
bRE SULLIVAN,
U. S. Commissioner and Notary
Public.
Lmnd Filings and Proofs.
t-ORT BENTON, - - MONTAN.
QHAS. H. BOYLE,
United States Commissioner,
FORT BKNTON, MONT
.undttlings atd proofs. Abstract ot land filing
and proofs kept.
fcîp- Soldi«»' Land Scrip for sale and located.
p. e. stranahan
c. r. stranahan
gtranahan & stranahan
Att«rneys-at-Law
FORT BENTON,
MONTANA.
a. j. schmidt
g. c. schmidt
schrtldt & schrildt
Attorneys-at-Law
FORT BENTON, MONTANA
Office in Grand Union Hotel
H.
ricQINLEY,
Attorney-at-Law
FORT BENTON, - - - MONTANA
Office in the CumminRS block.
f. miller,
Attorney-at-Law
Offices over Benton State Bank
FORT BENTON, - - - MONTANA
L V. BEAULIEU,
ATTOR N EY-AT-LAW.
Havre, - Montana
Office in Skylstead Building
lloyd a . smith,
Surveyor and Civil Engineer.
Prices reasonable, and good work guaranteed.
Reservoir Work a Specialty.
CHINOOK,
MONTANA.
Surety Abstract Co.
FORT BENTON, MONT.
We are prepared to make Abstracts
of Title of any property in
Chouteau County
public
land and
cases.
MININQ
If you are interested in any contest
or any matter before the Interior De
partment, write to Clark & Wright,
registered land lawyers, 902 F Street
N. W. (opposite Gen'l Land Office),
Washington, D. C. Free information
about contests and where to obtain
scrip, locatable upon public lands,
without residence or cultivation.
BARGAINS
$20 Talking Machines
For only $7.50
DOUBLE DISC RECORDS
Only 65c
Regular $1.50 Books
To Close at 60c
CRANE'S
POST OFFICE STORE
This Underwear
Is Remarkable
for its weariHg qualities ;
fit and comfort it brings
the wearer , as it is made
to measure . Can be
built any desirable way
the customer wishes .
An equally desirable
for Ladies also .
TAILOR MADE
UNDERWEAR
and SHIRTS
MEN and WOflEN
*0» P AINTING
FINISHING
PAPER HANGING
DROP A POSTAL TO
S. KN0WLES
FORT BENTON, MONT
Trappers and shippers of
RAW FURS
who wa/nt TOP PRICES a.nd
honest assortments should
WRITE FOR OUR PRICE LIST. WE
quote wK&t Wt pay aad pay what
WE quote. DEHMRAwmCQ. A oio 7 :
UNITED STATES LAND OflTO
My office is in a position to handle all kinds oi
Land Office business, andif you need information
quick or any work done in the office, you can
have it attended to by writing, wiring or telephon
ing to me. My office is in the same building as the
United States Land Office and all work can be
taken up and attended to without delay. *■
•«TALK WITH CAPUTH"
Benton State Bank
Fort Benton, Montana
Capital Stock, •
Surplus, - - -
• $125,000.00
- 9 12,500.00
Directors :
C. J. McNamara G. W. Frields
Geo. B. Bourne
Geo. L. Overfleld
D. G. Lockwood
A. E. McLeish
J. S
J. P. Williams
C. B. Power
L. D. Sharp
F. A. Flanagan
Brown
Officers :
C. B. P owe », President
L. D. S harp , Vice President
F. A. F lanagan , Cashier
J. F. S ullivan , Ass't Cashier
We solicit your business and offer you
every accommodation consistent
with safe and profitable banking
Think of the Inconvenience and lose If yonr
deeds and other valuable papers are destroyed or
stolen. We have fire and burglar proof safety
boxes for rent. Each box le absolutely private
as you will have the only key that will open It.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits
You Can Own a Home
Cheaper in Fort Benton
Than in any other town in Northern
Montana. It's the best place to live
in twelve months in the year in the
United States. Fine schools, fine
churches, good people, fine climate.
Surrounding country rich. Ask about
those cheap town lots. Terms easy.
c. WILL MORRISON
% FORT BENTON, MONT.
Me recommend the
M ontana
E m p l oyment A gency
Both male and female help employed.
J. NIcGOWAN, Prop.
13 Second St. South
GREAT FALLS Mont.
Telephone 438 P. O. Box SU
Bear Greek Goal
Best on the Market
Kindling Wood for Sale
JOHN MUIR, Agent
Phone.
41 red
Burn Gait
LUriP
and NUT
Stoves and Ranges.
NELSON LUriP
and EGG
For Furnaces and Steam.
In
H. LaBARRE , Local Agent.
Leave Orders at Benton Stables.
HIRAM F. SMITH.
Cattle branded on
right ribs .
Horses same brsrd
on right ahoalder .
Vent for cattle srd
horses , same brr .nd
on right hip .
p. o. address —
Whitlash , mot«
Note — Address is given wrong in brand book a
h. t. Hmith , Highwood .
MILNER CATTLE CO.
M. E. M ilner, Pres. and Manager, Fort Benton,
Montana.
Main brands a«
shown in the ac
oompanylag cuts. .
Also owi all
c a t tle bearing t e
single " sqnan "
.brand, and all
rebranded cattle
bearing only
eross P.
Also own brent
en right hip called
"square Ï."
Range from Bear
aw mountains ea - -
ward to Fort Pea s
between the Milk a 1
Missouri rivers. A> 1 )
south of the M:s.
souri river, betweei
Arrow creek and K 1
Sbonkin Range .
Parties wishing to porckas« live
staok will fimà aoH« attractive affer
iaffs la eur advertisia? ce tunas.

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