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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, August 23, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1918-08-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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Atltendon Prodoers!
Small individual store co-operation
a thing of the past.
The Montana Stores Co., a Cor
poration, is co-operating on a plad
where the power of co-operation will
be of mutual benefit to the communi
ty and state. Anyone interested in
co-operation should acquaint them
selves with the principles and work
ing plan of the Montana Stores Co.,
now operating in Sheridan County,
Montana.
All inquiries and dates for xplana
tion on these principles will be cheer
fully attended to by
Gus W. Vahl
Promoter
Whitetail, - Mont.
COOL DRINKS FOR
ot a s
Walk in and sit down
We will treat you right
THE VALLEY
Kelly. & Goodman, Proprietors
Robt. R. Kahle
OUTLOOK
Sells the Champion Cream Saver
Threshers' Supplies
Belting
Tank Pumps
Hose and Guamtid Pulme . Diting
WE CARRY A ULL LINE OF SUPPUSS
FOR. THE ,AN . '
S. a " r C a '
it:f" ý _"-s tý
..OTHE R VICOY FrT LEAC
OUR WASHINGTON LyTTER
Washia.ton, D. C., Ag. 22,--t
all the histoza of the writing of go%
ernment reports no better job has ev
er been turned Eut than the expose
of the unpatriotic character of the
packing trust by the federal trade
commission. It is plain, straight
forward English, and it marshals
the facts in a way that leaves no
doubt as to the justice of the fight
made by the Nonpartisan league
farmers.
Take this paragraph, .for instance;
"Five corporations-Armour & Co.,
Swift '& Co., Morris & Co., Wilson
& Co., Inc., and the Cudahy Packing
company-together with their sub
sidiaries and . affiliated companies,
not only have a monopolistic control
over the American meat industry,
but have secured control, similar in
purpose if not yet in extent, over the
principal substitutes for meat, such
as eggs, cheese and vegetable-oil
products, and are ,rapidly extending
their power to cover fish and nearly
every kind of foodstuff."
THAT IS A SIMPLE STATE
MENT THAT WE ARE FACED BY
A FOOD TRUST IN TIME OF WAR.
That, too, is clear. So long as this
huge monopoly is permitted to live
it will continue to suck profits from
more than half of the total meat pur
chases of all the armies and navies
that are fighting against the kaiser
in Europe and Asia and upon the
seas.
Now, just where is the weakest
spot in the chain by which the allied
nations are tied to the chariot of this
packing trust ?
The federal trade commission finds
that "The monopolistic position of
the Big Five is based not only upon
the large proportion of the meat
business which they handle, ranging
from 61 to 86 per cent in the prin
cipal lines, but PRIMARILY UPON
THEIR OWNERSHIP, separately or
jointly, OF STOCKYARDS, CAR
LINES, COLD STORAGE PLANTS,
BRANCH HOUSES AND OTHER
ESSENTIAL FACILITIES FOR
THE DISTRIBUTION OF PERISH
ABLE FOODS."
That fact of ownership of stock
yards and all the rest of the mar
leting machinery is the central ad
vantage on which the trust is. built
up. Knock out the private monopoly
of stockyards and the rest of the
marketing arrangement, and you
nmock out the heart of the trust.
Public ownership antd free competi
tion of buyers in the stockyards, and
public ownership of the wholesale
markets. which supply the retail meat
dealers, will put the Armours, the
Swifts and the Morrises off their
golden thrones.
And here is the language in which
the commission answers:
"The rapid rise of the packers to,
power and immense wealth, and
their present strangle hold on food
supplies, were not based necessarily
on their ownership of packing houses,
but upon their CONTROL OF THE
CHANNELS OF DISTRIBUTION,
particularly the stockyards, private
car lines, cold storage plants and
branch houses. Similarly the GREAT
PROFITS WHICH THEY HAVE
SPCURED AND ARE NOW SE
CURING are not primarily due to
exceptional efficiency in operating
packing houses and manufacturing
plants, but are secured through their
monopolistic control of the distribu
tive' machinery. This applies not
only to the meat industry, but to the
other branches of the food industry
which they control, as is evidenced
by the fact that particularly in re
cent years they have made far great
er efforts to secure control of the dis
tribution of the product than to se
cure manufacturing plants in - the
case of such products as cheese and
canned goods.
"As long as the packers control
these distributive utilities, producers
will be at the mercy of the big pack
ers, competition will be restrained
and consumers generally will con
tinue to pay the price of monopoly.
"Control and manipulation of the
livestock markets` have been 'the
great 'factors in the discouragement
of livestock production. Control of
the ransportatibn and marketing fa.
eili have been the instruments by
whie competitors have been crushed.
'WA mee no poeibility of afecting
the 'fLdamxetal improvemeat~
which the praes&t's letter sought,
dlert . ofii acquaiition by the feder
al goverseems of the distributive
And be t
*#AIln .MIpewaI tomg e4
F :ic .R f*'K'
upon whW: :e greaw fters' move
ment in the Weest s etSblished--to
open the' cha iels O c© lomerce in
foods ,knd renbei . ductas and in
sure their free flow from producer to
consumer. The federal trade com
mission finds it the one logical and
practical way, whether in time of
war or of peace. That is why it re
commends:
"I. That the goverfment acquire,
through the railroad administration,
all rolling stock used for the trans
portation of meat animals, and that
such ownership be declared a gov
ernment monopoly.
"2. That the government acquire,
through the railroad administration,
the principal and necessary stock
yards of the country, to be treated
as freight depots and to be operated
under such conditions as will insure
open, competitive markets, with uni
form sale of charges for all services
performed, and the acquisition or es
tablishment of such additional yards
from time to time as the future de
velopment of livestock production in
the United States may require. This
is to include the customary adjuncts
to stockyards.
"3. Tha the government acquire
through 4he railroad administration,
All privately owned refrigerator cars
and all' necessary equipment for
their proper operation, and that such
ownership be declared a government
monopoly.
"4. That the federal government
acquire such of the branch houses,
cold storage plants and warehouses
as are necessary to provide facili
ties for the competitive marketing
and storage of food products in the
principal centers of distribution andl
consumption. The same to be oper
ated by the government as public
markets and storage places under
such conditions as will afford an out
let for all manufacturers and hand
lers of food products on equal terms.
Supplementing the market and stor
age facilities thus acquired, the fed
eral government to establish through
the railroad administration, all the
terminal of all principal points of
distribution and consumption, central
wholesale markets and storage
plants, with facilities open to all
upon payment of just and fair
charges."
If the president and congress act
favorably upon this recommendation
--which is the judgment of the best
investigators and stock and meat ex
perts in America, who have been
employed upon the study for the
past year-then the Big Five will be
smashed by one blow of the big fists
of an outraged Uncle Sam. The
railroad administration will be auth
orized to take over and operate the
refrigerator cars, the stock cars and
the stockyards, with their equipment.
The government will take over and
operate the branch meat houses in
the big cities, from which the aetail
ers get their. meats. Every farmer,
every small buyer or butcher, every
co-operative enterprise, will get equal
treatment in the stockyards and in
the market where the product is sold
to the retailer. The graft will be
abolished.
JUDSON KING ON THE LEAGUE
Back from a speaking tour through
'Minnesota, North Dakota and Idaho,
Judson King, secretary of the Na
tional Popular Government League,
has returned to his office here, jubi
lant over the way the folks out West
are waking up to the need for demo
cratic progress.
"The rank and file of the voters
feel that their day.of protest is over,
and the day of construction is come,"
is the way he sizes up the situation.
"They are willing to back up a sen
sible constructive program. They
know that regulation of big business
has failed, and they are going in for
public ownership of, public utilities.
They do not seem to take the alight-I
est alarm when the cry of 'socialism'
is raised.
"Everywhere I found the people
determined to keep the railroads.
They are delighted that President
Wilson has taken over the telephones
and telegraphs. tey are squa1reb
back of the presidenit's war program.
The federal trade commission's re
port on war peoAteerig h e
the people. to the -h~b Ad thi
have no - for ti bllhg meat )Va
" m o ie that - 'teea r
c.. THE ICE MAN
You will need him this weather
and be will come on the jump be
-= cause he knows that you need his
,ice.
.Just.a little ice at very small cosy
will save a whole lot of expense in'
preserving perishable goods.
Everybody wants the ICE MAN
now. Call him yourself, today.
AGENT for CONTINENTAL OIL CO., for Pure
Missouri River Ice, Office phone No 3. Servic "re
all hours. Light and heavy draying, phone 141e
JACK'S TRANSFER LINE JA. K,, ,
Mining Supplies
Buy your blasting powder now, the
demand will cause a shortage. Our
supply is going to be very short .
PLENTYWOOD, HARD MONTWANA
PLENTY WOOD, MONTANA
Save the Middle
Man's Profit
SELL YOUR CREAM DIRECT
to us. We will sell our products
to the consumer. We can ship
the finished product cheaper
than you can the raw material.
Cash prompt payments.
Come in and see us.
PLENTYWOOD CREAMERY CO.
Plentywood, Montana
When a man gets to wantig
real tobacco comfort and
lasting quality he can go
straight to Real Gravely
Chewing Plug every time.
Peyton Brand
Real Gravely
Chewing Plug
lOc a pouch--and wrt
Crewely lats so much longerit
no rors to £chew than di
P. B. Gravely Tobacco COýP
Danville, V W ii'a
* a.
4DVE:jr2

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