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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, October 04, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1918-10-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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c~~nunubig~~~ "ý U l O K ~ O O r R VoL VI. Number8
VOLUME I .
PLENY
PLENTYWOOD, SHEiDAN C, MOANA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER
rDTr IM" P .mLr , ,, .._ .
,~ ~ ,,,; ,s~upa~. -. ... . Ii-'-F~'~~~P1 •, HI~)JIII
HERTLING CABINET' FALLS
AS BULGARIA SURRENDERS
Collapse of Turkey Considedred I ithbI.
Way Into Austria Opened to Alies
War May End Soon
Bulgaria is definitely out of the
war and Turkey, virtually cut off
from communication with her allies
and her armies in Palestine almost
annihilated, likely soon will be forced
to sue for a cessation of hostilities
against her.
Seeing defeat staring her in the
face through the swift progress of
the Serbian, Italian, British, Greek
and French troops in the reclaiming
of Servia and the invasion of Bulgari
an territory, the Bulgars begged for
an armistice, reserving " to them
elves no conditions.
Back Door Thrown Open
In addition to the isolation of
Turkey, the back door to a direct in
vasion of Austria-Hungary is flung
wide open to the Allies and doubtless
the time is not far distant when ad
vantage to the full will be taken of
the new avenue through which the
PRESIDENT DRAWS
FIRST NUMBER
PRESIDENT OPENS CEREMONY
') FNUMBERING 13,000,000 NATIO
','S DRAFT REGISTRANTS t
Washington, Oct. 2.-The drr
of order numbers for the thibt gA
million draft registrants enrolled
September 12 was started Moday by d
President Wilson.
Blindfolded, the President groped
into the great glass lottery bowl and
drew out one of 17,000 capsules. It
contained a slip numbered 322, thus e
giving to men holding that serial Y
number, first place in their respec
tive classes after registrants already C
classified under previous registra
tions. The number was low enough
to touch the list of every draft board I
in the country except one or two of
the very smallest. w
Vice President Marshall drew the c2
icond number and was followed by
sixteen other notables who hal been e
invited to participate in the formal
ceremony of opening the drawing.
When it was over, officers and en
listed men of the army, assisted by a
corps of tellers, settled down to the
task of emptying the bowl. Two t
thousand numbers had been drawnca
And recorded before 4 o'clock in the Wi
fternoon, indicating that probably to
36 hours would be required to com
ilete the wor'. The readers and tell- A
in #orked in relays, so the drawing
ctinued almost without interrup.
t' rough the night. Provost Mar
l General Crowder hoped to fln
'b early Wednesday evening.
t 100 Numbers Telegraphed to
ly the first 100 numbers were M
Beeause o the country by telegraph. a
(of the impracticability of He
(Continued on Page Eight) her
UtDAN COUNTY
COMPLETES QUOTA
)RTI J LOAN SUBSCRIBED ON
e 253,450.00 IS TOTAL
VlT UP TO THURSDAY.
PTDop county has gpne "over
týuaa# d this was done in recobrd
Without any big noises or
. The local campaign om
ere requested to complete the
Oct 1erty bond sale quota by
'nrard, and that was done, too,
h tot ighlt, Oct. 3rd, $253,450.0
t ota, l subscribed in Sheridan
2,the 00oo was the quota
county.
AT SALE DAY.
OUTLLOOK OCT. T
- . Nau, of Outlook, was .
o andinformed us tat
to ea Red cross Ate is u
*hetdas Of the W lo =
theevent.
he enemy can be reached. With the
,ff debacle in Servia and Bulgaria com
es plete, the Austro-Hungarians in At
t bania soon will be put to the test,
and when their evacuation to their
own borders is accomplished the AT
s lies will have welded an iron senu
circle about the Central powers froni
te the Black sea to the North sea.
)t Viewing the situation in all its as
k Pects-the success of the great of
fmive in Beiim and France; the
i- blotting eat of the war zone in the
'r Balkans; the ~utting off of the TurksI
L- from intercourse with Germany and
Austro-Hungary, except by the long
route through the Caucasus and
f southern Russia and the steady gains
that are being made by the Allies in
I making Russia once more a factor
s in the struggle--the darkest days of
- the war seemingly are faced by the
f Austro-Germans. It may mean the
e end of the war soon.
THIRTEEN IOF IN
FLUEMZA IN SCOBEY
Spanish Ialuenza has taken a to
tal of ±igst lives in Scobey during
the five days. Martin Smith, sa.
Suand Ed Lahiere, farmer,
I~of the 8cobey country,
dW.t "isy alight Kilgane
hemadle, i ' u0 mWasaest Was found
dead in h~~ adek Tuesday afternoon,
hav~j been sick for the last five
ZION atb irnnt 16
yeýsr.=eil . agta the
first one to be claimed by the dis.
ease. George Nelson, a painter, lied
yesterday morning. Mrs. Gustave I
Knutson died Monday night. T. L. I
Coughlin, a transient, died Sunday
night. _
Five more deaths have been re- c
ported just before- we go to press. t
Doctors, nurses and civilians are r
working day-and night with new f
cases continually appearing. Many i
whole families are sick without i
either medical aid or household
help. The isituation is extremely
serious.
Caaes Appear in Flaxville
Reports come from Flaxville show
that there are a' great number of
cases in a critical condition and
without sufficient medical assistance.
to properly attend to those afflicted.
A. C.M. Propaganda
Reaches Trenches
A Montama adier in France seds
to Butte a clipping from the Daily
Mail, an English journal printed in
Paris for the soldiers in the trenches.
He says, "If the Montana soldiers
here were back home they would see
that Miss Rankin goes to the senate."
Here's the clipping from" our own"
correspondent:
~(SS. RANKIN'S DEFEAT AT
THE POLLS IS EXPECTED
Her Sympathy With L W. W. Union
Areoses Opposition to Montana
prevails amng politica obpryerrs
that Miss J eaaette Rankk Amai
cals sole lsgrel wm , wil be de
eated in her effort to secure the yre
lad emilatks for _ United
Went aenate fra x esteam Nems
th d2
THE LIGHT OF JUSTICE amBlR~AKIIOG
j FOR THE %P UCEfS IN THE NORTHWEST
ý '-- -.1
Some More
Efficiency
THE FOLLOWING LETTERS .WRI! .N BY OUR EFFICIENT COUN
TY UDITOR, "SUNNYM I D,.~ i D, THE MAN WHOM TH*
STATE PUBLIC k.rWAR. As.~aD .O . S 80. . "EFFI
CIENT" WITH THE "RU"BER VA4P," TELLS TALES.
d Following are two letters writteni
r by our efficient County Auditor to
G. Peter Westerlund of Antelope.
,y For an example of "efficiency"
these letters are prize takers. To a
- casual reader they will "get by," and
s. there is where the "efficiency" is de
e monstrated, But after a little care
, ful study the features of the "nigger
y in the *oodpile" is clearly discern
Lt ible.
d Read the letters.
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN
office of
J. F. REDMOND
County Auditor
Plentywood, Montana
f May 24, 1918.
d Peter Westerlund,
. Antelope, Montana.
Dear Sir:
With reference to seed grain order
No. 631 for seed grain delivered to
C. E. Lindquist, it will be necessary
that you file a claim to support the
C arrant.
You state that we sent you a war
rant in the sum of $210.00, we un
doubtedly misunderstood the appli
caot as to the price you charged for
the grain, therefore if you will re
turn the warrant of $210.00 in pay-|
ment thereof, we will issue a war
rant in the, sum of $230.00.
Have the claim subscribed and
sworn to either before a Notary I
Publiec or a Jzustice of the Peace, at
tach seled aiin order No. 631 to this
claim and kindly return it at your '
earliest coinve.ience, so that we may
e.ssaete c li* Iidi. caaenaetos
J. F. REDIOND, .d
Cou ty Auditor. t
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN
.m. ot
J. FP. RI.MOND
Gounty Auditor
S Platywvod, a
i$230.00.
Very truly yours,
J. F. REDMOND,
. County Auditor.
id We will and the information that
e-"Sunny Jim's" signature was not
signed with a "rubber stamp."
Now in order to make the "Ei
'- ciency" of these letters understand
able some explanation is required.
The first letter for instance.
Prior to the time this letter was
written, a warrant in the sum of
$210 was sent to Peter Westerlund
in payment for a huhdred bushels of
seed wheat delivered by Peter West
erlund to his neighbor, C. E. Linquist
on seed grain order No. 631. Mr.
Westerlund wrote the Auditor, call
ing his attention to the fact that the
r warrant was for $210 ($2.10 per
o bushel), when he understood that the
I Montana & Dakota elevator was get
e ting $2.30 per bushel for the grain
they furnished and his neighbor, Mr.
C. E. Lundquist was paying the
county $2.48 per bushel for the seed
wheat, the 18 cents advance being to
r pay the county for the cost of hand!
- ing the grain, making out papers,
- etc., and that he, Peter Westetlund
should have a warrant for $230.00
instead of for $210.00 which' had been
sent to him, his grain being just as
Sgood, if not better grain than that`
furn d by the Montana & Dakota
Elevatr Company, and his neighbor
was paying $2.48 for the grain.
New note the cleverness of "eMf
ýalese ina," a the first 3aO a
·hest efster. He writes
. sp"ith :ermance to seed Lta 1 ;.
der Na 881 for seed grali delivered
to C.I . Iadquist, it will be .*-es
ser that i you fle a CLAIM TO SUP
POUrRTHE WARRANT.
W"Y rtate that we seat you a war-
rri . the scm of $21O.0, we am
- mriuinu a d.neru.td the appo
eska.e prie. Yu charged mDfor the
#raf sýa it e f you wilt retarn
t i m m.. or $21e. Ja psymeat
ife will inse a warrant h m
a *M will be uqseiary a
SL T BUPORT
Stosems that the
~·r- 7
CLOSE CONTRACTS WITH
WORLD'S LARGEST FARMERS
Local Banker Joins Morgan In Gigantic Farm
ing Enterprise. Thousands of Acres
Will be Farmed Scientifically
NONPARTISAN
LEAGUE TICKET
FARMERS AND FRIENDS OF THE
LEAGUE SHOULD CLIP THIS
AND CARRY IT UNTIL THE
LEAGUE WINS A COMPLETE
VICTORY NOV. 5th.
WE'LL STICK, WE'LL WIN.
U. S. Senate
JEANNETTE RANKIN
National Ticket
Associate Justice S. Court
CHAS H. COOPER
Republican ,Ticket
Railroad Commissioner
JACK HALL
Deinocrat Ticket
State Senator
CLAIR STONER
National Ticket
State Representative
J. S. NYQUIST
Republican Ticket
County Commissioner
JOHN ANDERSON
Republican Ticket
Sheriff
JACK BENNETT
Republican Ticket
County Auditor
BEATRICE K. O'GRADY
Republican Ticket
Co. Clerk & Recorder
A. A. MAJOR
Republican Ticket
County Treasurer
REX MOVIUS 4
Republican Tilkt
County Attorney
J. J. GtJNTHREW
Republican Ticket
County Assessor
H. B. HILL
Republican Ticket
Co. Supt. of Schools t
MABEL V. THAYER a
National Ticket a
County Surveyor r
C. E. CORYELL
Republican Ticket p
County Coroner c.
M. M. JOHNSON
Democratic Ticket 0
Don't forget that Miss Rankin's t
name will be on the National Ticket;
also that of Clair Stoner for State
Senator and Miss Mabel V. Thayer a
for County Superintendent of Schools.
Clip this and take it with you to the d
polls and hunt the names .of the c4
League candidates. In this way you cl
will make no mistake. Vote the t]
ticket straight.
tU
Nonpartisan League
Meetings To Be Held
Following is a list of dates of
. meetings which will be held by the
Nonpartisan League. A prominent
speaker will discuss the program of
I the League from the League stand
point.
The speaker will be a "beaner"
and you will want to hear hini wheth
er you like the League or not, and
the chances are that you will learn
something.
More details later. The dates are
Sfollows: .
Cu~lbcertmnOc, t. 2, p.m.
LaMark Oct. 27, evening.
Sainvile, Oct. 28, afternoon.
Mondak, Oct. 28, eveiang.
Froid, Oct. 29, afternoon.
McCabe, Oct. 29, evang.
M.ediadn Lake, Oct. 0, atternoon.
omesutead, Oct 80, evening.
Antelope, Oct. 81, afternoon.
Dagmar, Oct. 81, evenaing. t
Doole, Nov. 1, afternoon. t
Redstone, Nov. 1, ueveig.
FlsvDIle, Nov. 2, swets.
Wadsu , Nov. 2, evesr.
W Nov. , afternoon.
Dalevrle, Nov. 8, evenisg. a
( tin* Nov. 4, aft ree tm
Pl+itýw d Novo.4 evening. , a
ids .i. . ..w.i .b
=. and s fs~id1
XIIL
,T.4
The following story from last
week's Poplar Standard give interest
ling insight into farming operations
T as projected by Wall Street and local
capital.
Mr. Thomas D. Campbell, pres'den:
of the Corporation and Mr. F. W.
Sg tevens, vice president of the co..ipa
E ny, were in Poplar three days of last
week and before they left the final
clincher was put on the Ft. Peck pro
position, making in certain beyond
doubt that the Campbell-Morgan
Company, the largest farming cor
poration in the world by the way,
will operate on this reservation. The
leases, equipment and machinery of
the Bieseker-Martin outfit, who up to
the present have blazed the trail in
big farming projects for the Ft. Peck
have been taken over by the Mon
tana Company and besides the 4500
acres the Beiseker-Martin people
have prepared for crop the Montana
Company expects to whip some 15,
000 or 16,000 additional acres in the
line for crop within the next two
growing seasons. Next spring they
will put at least 10,000 acres into ac
tual crop and break up some 10,000
acres besides. This company oper
ates in units of 10,000 acres. This
means that they will put 10,000
acres in crop in a certain year and
summer fallow 10,000" acres. The
next year the 10,000 acres in crop
will be turned over and the first unit
sown to crop and vica versa. In
brief the policy of this Company who
farm strictly according to scientific
principles is to have a unit yield a
crop every second year. They have .
crop each year of course but it is a
separate unit each year.
The Ft. Peck project will be di
rected solely by C. J. Beiseker, the
Plentywood banker, according to Mr.
Campbell.
"You may say for us positively
that Mr. Beisker will direct the oper
ations here, said Mr. Campbell. His
will be the last word on the Ft. Peck
project."
Mr. Beiseker expects to establish
pffices in Poplar immediately and de
clared that the work will be handled
from this point. Mr. W. J. Breeke,
of Grand Forks, who has been with
the Montana Company for 12 years
will be in personal charge of the of
fices. Mr. Harry Martin, who was
spoken of in the highest terms by
Mr. Campbell, will, it is understood
direct the full operations for the new
company. The company have pur
chased three new Aultman-Taylor
tractors and by the end of the week
expect to be tearing up the earth on
the Beiseker-Martin place and ad
jacent to it with the aid of 8 tree
Itors pulling 10 plow bottoms on old
ground and 8 bottoms on new ground.
Some of the land the company ex
pect to farm is on another part of
the reservation but respecting the
wishes of Mr. Campbell and Mr. Beis
eker that part of the program will
not be dealt with at th ,;m ....
Mr. Thomas D. Campbell, the pre.
siding genius in all this vast under
taking is an interesting character.
Like all truly big men he is not giv
en to talk about himself. When pres
sed he will admit certain facts but
the interviewer must draw him out;
he is not there to give you a first
p.rson singular inter b any
r or means. "the Standard
.b was inclinec t..a #bout most
anything else thank . This
newspaper was able however to learn
a few things about this young man
38 years of age who is at the head
of the largest ofganifation of its
kind in the world. For instance he
undertook the work on the Ft. Peck
reservation at the personal request
of Seeretay Franklin K. lane, of
the Interior, and Herbert Hoover of
the National Food Administration.
Mr. C.aMpbeU who is)an engineer as
r -as a i r wanted to go to
war. He was willnag to do his share
a~er hre in the fatrng line as he
always has but just now be wanted
to getlt * ts·lt thins. Lano
and Hoove haow that the word's
aat gIy is des. O r 0m py
JU LbY *wt
~! m-;a

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