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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, October 05, 1923, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

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«broadcasts attacks on
labor civil liberties union says
,nNF AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY OF NEW
Effuses to permit defense of work.
1REI liberals is charge.
ÿs AND
tho radio to spread
u ' intr ! j hor and anti-1
• in according to the
aean van Civil Liberties.
A m«le public the re
" ' Ivl correspondence
e: arrving on with W.
fairer of the Ameri-i
-kres- N 3 jeiegraph broad
ephone a n(1
r station* ()fficer , of the
:nf thirties Union, their|
ClU , '..tracked by William
„ Vnf the Department of
cï 2 U organization which
^ (i in a statement
5UPP Iujv evidence was
' R irn< to substantiate his
' of the Union de- 1
I
maintain that, during the
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BUSINESS
He have completed our moving from our old stand at
the Little OI' Store up street to the
KTER BUILDING
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^nere we are now at work placing stock for your in
^ on in this more commodious show room. It
° e a nionth yet before the stock is entirely ar
Nd for the convenience of the public, and until it
*'H be impossible for us to give our multitude of
Römers the attention and service, for which the
NÜAND-STRAND COMPANY, is noted, but our
Comers, we are sure, will bear with us, as we do
? . *° serve them, as we work toward a situation
Wowing
*.*
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A
AND BETTER
ICE THAN EVER
IlLAND-STRAND
t
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THE OLD RELIABLE STORE".
%
Recommend
r e
V
those watches which our exper
ience has taught us require the
least attention to keep them per
forming accurately. That's why
you will make no mistake in asking
our advice on what watch to buy.
I?
il ^
Srac'•— y o%
u.
t*
m
You will find all the newest styles in
dials and cases, and movements of
unquestioned superiority in our store.
J
A. G. AMUNDSEN
—The Jeweler—
» 40.00
recent walkout of the union coal min
ers, the strikers were attacked over
the raido, as was also the Socialist
Party.
Immediately after the Bums attack,
the Civil Liberties Union requested of
Harkness that some member of their
national committee be permitted !o
reply over the radio. Norman Hap
good was chosen to broadcast a state
ment but was turned down
ground that the -programs
pretty well filled for some time to
come."
Professor Robert Morss Levett, act
ing chairman of the Union, then asked
Harkness if he found anything objec
tionable in Norman Hapgood's svnop
sis of his proposed speech which he
had submitted for the approval of the
radio committee on broadcasting.
oil the
were
would fidve^an^jm if Darkness
„ n „,. glVe an appointment to Han
fo ^peak on™ "i th ru liberal America^,
wiÄe°ne a Ä rt,eS °" " y date
ui ratner John A. Rvan or otW
men cans who belive in the consti
as4°mhl nghts , °/ free s Peech and free
cafonwT 5 ' be S )re Ha PS00d's appli
cation was considered.
Harkness re^d to answer these
see tW® ClaiITling that "we do not
ee that any good can be accomplished
?y a discussion which
mvite."
ir T . h L A o ri'i Can f ivil Liberties Union,
MS.«* radio°^roadcasting
nïïT , Â: Hrtn " on Septembw
. ■?r Vie w 0f . the importance of Con
stitut 10 » Week and the fact that the
National Security League is broad
casting on that subject, we respectful
ly request the opportunity of having
Norman Hapgood or some other prom
inent citizen on our committee broad
cast on civil liberty and the constitu
tion.
your questions
Harkness refused to
Union's telegram.
,, lu ls * appropriate that the attitude
of the American Telephone and Tele
graph Company in regard to free
speech should be so explicitly defiant
m connection with the celebration of
Constitution Week,"
declares. "The results of
pondence with that
answer the
Professor Lovett
our corres
. .. organization are
indicative of the danger involved in
the control of the radio by
tions that are reactionary
view of public announcements.
corpora
in their
WORKERS ARE
BLACK LISTED
CZAR LYSLE OF STEEL TOWN IS
ON WARPATH. GETS WARN
ING FROM GOVERNOR PINCHOT
Three workers
who attended the
free speech rally in McKeesport, Pa.,
Sunday, September 9th, at which three
speakers aÄd two other workers were
arrested by order of Mayor Lysle of
that city, were fired from the mills
on the following Tuesday, according to
information received by the Amercian
Civil Liberties Union from the repre
sentative of that organization in Mc
Keesport.
The communication to the American
Civil Liberties Union follows:
"Czar Lysle is on the warpath. He
threatens to deport all foreign radi
cals and to imprison the Americans,
Three workers who attended our meet
ing were fired from the mills on Tues
day following. The owner of the lot
on which our rally was held has been
put through the third degree and
threatened by both the owner of the
mill where he works and the Mayor."
• According to Robert W. Dunn, ?/
sociate director of the Civil Liberties
L T nion, who was one of the five ar
rested in McKeesport, Attorney Gcn
eral Woodruff of Pennsylvania is in
vestigating Mayor Lysle's alleged un
lawful action. In a letter to the May
or of the steel town, Attorney Gener
al Woodruff explains that it is the
Governor's duty to "take care that the
law's of the state be faithfully execut
ed." Woodruff has informed the Un
ion that if Gov, Pinchot finds the
Mayor guilty of violating the constitu
tion of the state, he may bring a mo
tion for the impeachment of Mayor
Lysle before the state Sepate.
"Meanwhile w'e are appealing our
illegal arrests before the Allegheny
Court on Monday, September 24,"
Dunn states. "We are also going to
enjoin Mayor Lysle from his criminal
assaults on the civil rights of the steel
w'orkers."
SAFE ROAD LIGHTING
OF THE NEXT DECADE
CURE FOR GLARE SEEN IN PER
MANENT ROAD LIGHTS.
"Legislature against the glaring
headlight fiend," says the motorist.
But legislation doesn't cure the evils
of glare, mainly because the law which
cuts down the glare so it is "safe"
also cuts down the light so much that
its use is unsafe.
Comparatively speaking, glareless
lights can be, and are made, but their
use requires a scientific adjustment of
the lens, reflector and lamp, each to
each and the whole to the running
plane of the car. Such an adjustment
does not remain permanent; variations
in tire pressure alter it, and jars, jolts
and looseness of parts alter the rela
tions of the lamp and reflector.
For the present, better designs of
lenses, greater strictness in regula
tions as to tilt of headlights ,and new
er and better designs of headlights
must be depended upon to minimize, if
not to cure the evil. But in the future,
the complete cure will come in lighted
highways. .
A hundred years ago cities were un
lighted, or, if lighted at all, were very
poorly illuminated. In thousands of
small towns today the street lamps
are so few and far between that the
neighbor pays his evennig visit equip
ped with a lantern. Yet our cities
are well lighted; so well lighted that
the "glare" trouble of headlights is
easily solved by forbidding, in cities,
any but signal headlights.
Exactly as the Post Office Depart
ment maintains beacons to guide its
mail fliers at night, so will the Nation
al Government eventually light its na
tional highways at night,
volume of traffic which will inevitably
flow' over national highways between
great centers, it will be more econom
ical to light them from the side, than
to permit the motorist to light his own
section of the road with an illumina
tion which causes accidents.
With the
There are 34 state highway projects
under construction representing
now
a complete cost of $1,959,133.70.
Broadus—Powder river bridge nears
completion.
Montana has 650 grain elevators
with combined capacity of 20,202,000
bushels. ...
SEN. WHEELER PREDICTS THIRD PARTY
SAY ^ NEWPARTY LED BY "OUTSTANDING AMERI
CAN WILL PUT ELECTION UP TO CONGRESS.
Chicago, Sept. 26.—-The Chicago
American reports an interview with
Sen. B. K. Wheeler of Montana today
by William K. Hutchinson, Interna
tional News Service Staff Correspond
ent, published under a Washington
date line of September 26, as follows:
The creation of a third party,
led by an "outstanding Ameri
can," would throw the 1924 presi
dential election into Congress,
Senator Burton K. Wheeler, Dem
ocrat, of Montana, told Interna
tional News Service today.
"Making his first visit to the
capital since his election last Fall,
Wheeler, declared the West
tired of both old parties" and
would demand progressive candi
dates in 1924 under threat of bolf
ing.
was
..
WEST FOR CHANGE
The Montana senator saw a
"dead-locked election" under such
circumstances, with the West sup
porting the third party, the South
going Democratic and the North
and Northeast voting Republican.
He did not concede the third party
a chance of winning the elation.
The "outstanding Americans,"
who could lead a third party into
a real heat with its older rivals.
Senator Robert M. LaFolIette and
Senator William E. Borah, in the
order named.
Ford is the strongest man in •
the whole West. He probably can
carry every state west of the Mis
sissippi if nominated by one of
the older parties. There isn't even
any question about the coast
states, including California,
LA FOLLETTE STRONG
"L&FolIette is stronger than the
East ever dreams. He can carry
Wisconsin, Minnesota. North Da
kota, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas,
probably South Dakota and possi
bly Montana, Idaho and Washing
ton.
*4
It is doubtful whether a third
because the
party could win
South will go Democratic as usual
and the Republican party will re
tain Äs hold on the East and
New England."
COMMISSIONERS
PROCEEDINGS
At 2 o'clock P. M. September 22nd,
1923 the Board of County Commission
ers met in Special Session, All Mem
bers and Clerk present.
On motion the Bond of The State
Bank of Plentywood Approved and the
Clerk was instructed to forward Mr.
L. Q. Skelton Superintendent of Banks
the following information: We, the
undersigned Board of County Commis
sioners of Sheridan County, Plenty
w'ood, Montana, wish to inform you
that we now have a good, and suffic
ient Bond signed by N. L. *Neîson,
Mollie Fadness, Peter Marron, H. W.
Earner, and F. N. Huff, Covering
county deposit now 7 in the amount of
$12,621.77, deposited in the State Bank
of Plentywood, Plentywood, Montana.
Trusting that this will meet with
your approval, we are, Yours very
truly, R. G. Tyler, Jens Ibsen, and
Chas. Lundeen, Commissioners of
Sheridan County.
On motion taxes Nels Peter Moe,
page 38, Line 39 in the amount of
$29.72 cancelled account duplicate as
sessment.
On motion the reports of the Coun
ty Clerk and Recorder, Sheriff and
County Clerks Trial Balance Approved
On motion the Clerk and Recorders
Reports showing fees collected for
Butchers Licenses Months ending June
30th and August 31st, 1923 Approved.
On motion the resignation of Fran
cis Madden, Beryle Pierce, and Charles
Johnson, Clerks on tax books , Ap
proved.
On motion the appointment of J. J.
McElroy, Special Deputy Sheriff, tak
ing Joe Kohut to Warm Springs, Ap
proved.
On motion claims were allowed on
the following funds and the Clerk di
rected to issue warrants therefore.
GENERAL FUND
Olson, L. S., justice fees.
Salisbury, Rodney, exp. Care
Insane .
Crone, Emma, exp. visiting
schools .
Crone, Emma, exp. re Teachers..$17.67
Salisbury, Rodney, exp & mile
age
Dolin, Jos. F., county printing..,.$57.60
Dolin, Jos. F. county printing....$20.00
Casper, Guy, exp. on stolen
horses
$33.50
$159.13
$50.83
$101.25
$38.00
ROAD FUND
Nereson, Martin, road foreman. $60.00
Everson, Hal vor, road const.
Sparling, Harry, road const.
Hanson, Henry, road const.
Mill, Co. F. G. road const.
POOR FUND
Patterson, Mrs. Nellie, nursing
Triplett family .$224.00
Grant, Chas. refund Bachelor tax $3.00
Dahlby, Mrs. Julia, board for
Johnson boy.
Dahlby, Mrs. Julia, board for
Johnson boy .
Dahlby, Mrs. Julia, board for
... Johnson boy .
$17.30
..$7.00
$36.75
-$2.50
$15.00
$15.00'
$15.00
BRIDGE FUND
Plentywood Machine Shop, bridge
const. v .
Wolfe, A. E. loading lumber.
SEED RELIEF FUND
Klovstad, S. T. exp. collecting
notes .
At 5 o'clock P. M. September 22nd,
1923, the Board Adjourned.
Attest:
$ 21.00
-$2.50
$74.25
Chairman.
The Union Pacific System pays
taxes of $36,306 a day. This is an in
crease of nearly 300 per cent between
1912 and 1922 or from $4,668,875 to
$13,251,552. These taxes take 6.87
cents out of every dollar of gross
earnings or 27.3 cents out of every
dollar of net earnings.
Hassell—Iron Mask mine has suffic
ient ore showing to put on large crew
men.
Clerk
BOB SIM ON COAL
NATIONALIZATION
By LAWRENCE TODD
Federated Press Staff Correspondent.
Plymouth, Eng.—Nationalization of
the coal mines is today supported by
every section of British labor, but the
hostility of British capitalists to the
miners' plan is so deep that action will
probably await the time when the La
bor party has an overwhelming ma
jority in parliament.
So Bofcf Smilie told me, in an inform
al interview for the Federated Press.
And Smilie, who attained world fame
when he cross-examined the coal-land
owning dukes in the Sankey commis
sion inquiry in 1919, ought to know.
No man in Britain will question his
judgment or his information on this
central theme of the miners' struggle.
1 he miners want nationalization in
order that the industry may be run
for service rather than for profit, and
in order that their own lives may be
made more bearable through an ade
quate and uniform wage scale, regu
larity of employment and improved
working conditions. Their demands
led Lloyd George to create the Sankey
commission, with the understanding
that its report would be taken as the
program of the government. A ma
jority of that commission reported,
after an exhaustive investigation, that
private exploitation of coal mines in
Britain should be abolished in favor of
nationalization or some other plan.
Lloyd George failed to make good.
The miners then drew up their own
proposal, calling for the confiscation
of jdl mineral deposits, since these
were not created by human labor, and
for the condemnation and purchase by
the nation of all mines, since mines
are the produce of human labor.
These demands were made the object
of a strike, but the government suc
cessfully resisted the miners. It in-,
stinctively defended the private
ers of coal lands in their claim for a
toll on industry.
Today the British miners are in pro
cess of recovery from the wage cut
ting lockout of 1921. Smilie says they
will soon be back to a 90 per cent
basis in many districts. But they
know that their plan for rationaliza
tion must come up next time with the
whole force of the British working
class behind it.
"We must fact the fact," he said,
"that no capitalist government will
grant our demand. Nor would we be
safe in bringing it forward in a Labor
party government which held power
by only a moderate majority in the
house of commons. Reaction is or
ganized nationally through the Fed
eration of British Industries and
otherwise, and I feel sure that it is
internationally organized as well. We
have see reaction in armed revolt in
Italy and elsewhere on the European
continent, and we know that British
reaction might also take desperate
steps. If it had the support of the
army, and had the guns, great losses
might be inflicted on the unarmed
workers. We might be crushed out in
spite of our numerical majority.
"I do not look for a sudden indus
trial revolution. I look for peaceful
growth and steady building up of the
power of the workers of Britain. My
greatest hope is that they avoid fac
tionalism and misunderstandings be
tween right wing and left. Unless we
all stand together for the working
class emancipation we shall be beaten
here as the Italians have been beaten."
Smilie inquired as to two men in
the American labor movement. They
were John H. Walker and Duncan Mc
Donald of the Illinois
had watched the attempt to establish
a Farmer-Labor party in America in
which these men had a part. (McDon
ald is still in the fight while Walker
gave up at the 1923 convention of the
Illinois State Federaton of Labor.) In
his own recent triumphant campaign
for election to parliament, the vete' an
leader of the British miners had the
distinction of being opposed by
didate supported by all the capitalist
parties, under instructions from the
respective headquarters in London. A
feature of his campaign was a dem
onstration planned in the city of Dur
ham and carried out by 10,000
members of the Labor party.
All through the fight Smilie cheer
fully acknowledged the charges hurled
at him by the enemy press, that he
has all his life been in revolt against
capitalistic society. His majority was
the largest ever polled by Labor in
the constituency.
own
miners. He
a can
women
STILL FOUND
NEAR WESTBY
Sheriff Hayes and H. A. Roberts
made an unsuspected visit to the west
end of the county Thursday afternoon
for the purpose of stopping the sup
ply of illicit liquor in the west end
towns. The purpose was partially ac
complished as Tney returned to Cros
by in the evening with considerable
home-made distillery apparatus which
was found in
abandoned farm two miles northeast
of Westby—the old Effinger farm.
Inquiry at the neighboring farms fail
ed to reveal the owner of the still, so
Sheriff Hayes and Mr. Roberts en
gaged in a "Carrie Nation" act, de
stroying the contents of several bar
rels of mash, two gasoline stoves and
other utinsils ued in manufacturing
of the liquor which was carried on in
a deserted hen coop. The still con
fiscated was a crude affair, being con
structed by using two copper wash
boilers and the coil was a lead one
and this was the most "deadly" part
of the contraption. Patrons of the
"moonshiner" in the west part of the
county should thank their lucky stars
that Sheriff Hayes made the raid in
stead of the coroner to hold an inquest.
—Farmers Press, Crosby.
some shacks on an
Try a Want Ad—It brings Results.
10 cents a line per issue.
W
ELASTICITY OF QUOTA
CURE FOR STRIKE EVILS
--. •
c "s pbotosed MM,gration law
Washington, Sept. 27.—Much ad
verse comment has been arauvH in
Washington among go^ernmS of
ficiak bv thd overnmentail of
T..1- tV n statement accredited to i
Julius H. Barnes president of thî
Chamber of rnmrôil™ ° T - ."*®
States that immSZH? ° f the Lni 1 tefl
restrictions shouIH^b^l^ia (lao . ta law
of labor stress tn^nl ta" 1 tlTT ?, es
According ot niihMd-io i ' stnk ? e Vi s '
Barnes said^ P ** reports ' Mr *
"Would it Mrtt V.« « ». *• . ,
effective restraint nn a,K
if Tle o? lnÄ ° f P0Wer ;
present fmmio-r?t1 f t f buse as at
faxpd • quotas w « re re *
contract the WGre , free to
Dresses Of
Rare Beauty
The season's newest
colors in a variety of
tones, materials of the
finest weaves, and work
manship that interprets in
exacting detail the new
style tendencies, combine
to present for your aprov
al these most beautiful
gowns. „
A i.
.Co
A
»1
The prices for this Beau
tiful Dress creation de
pend on style and quality
—you can find something
to delight
range of prices, which run
you in our
SERGES — TRICOTINES — POIRET TWILLS
$5.75 $10. 75 $18.50 to $45.00
CREPE SILKS
A WONDERFUL SELECTION TO CHOOSE FROM
$18. 50 to $4 5.00
Kitzenberg's
Plenty wood's Best Ready-to-Wear Store
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A Quiet Dinner
«
The next time you want to give Her a real treat,
bring Her here and let us serve you one of our
tasty, well-cooked Dinners.
It will open the way to confidences and—but come
and see how cozy we can fix you up—almost like
eating in a home of your own.
TRY ONE OF OUR DELICIOUS
DINNERS ANY EVENING
CITY CAFE
HARRY KOIKE, Prop.
tial arbitration in any industry which
vitally affects the public?"
h«-»«*, «.«« w use me mi
™£L. 10P < | u ? ta a " u? s a means of
combating labor troubles
pvtrpmplv nninct in tv>o
to accept terms prescribed by impar
It is generally held in governmental
circles interested in the revision up
ward, rather than downward, of im
migration quality, that to use the im
would be
ext ,f mel y to % country
we H as to labor organizations. '
Quota law, it is noted, is not frar
or administered in favor of labor
capital, or as inimical to the interests
cither. Its purpose is to provide
time for the country as a whole to
as . s imilate its alien immigrants. To
l ake down the bars it is held, merely to
force strikers t0 accept terms, even if
such terms be dictated by an impartial
tribunal would be to degrade a pro
toction devised to raise the standard
S enshiPi int0 a mere 1001 pf in -
as
The
is not framed
or

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