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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, October 26, 1923, Image 11

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1923-10-26/ed-1/seq-11/

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1
i
i
—-tinue in very.
livestock coni declined
bue ranj * r (lue to !
: ' er the ' eastern
ly. 1,1 , u . grasshop
'crding to
: <sucCi t <
tho Montana
Iliv.'tjck Ke
t,.ck • ipments
Pus been
cj short
to deoievc
rough forced
and young
that the local!
force the
of a
i«jiows a do
iNA LIVE
STOCK REp° rt
V
rinS
jj irainl
X.I to
Restock rfP 0 *
\ Scot'
Crop ;
lets. aCC J
.or U
* (jfO
a id
i.ivc
■lay
mi 1
... temp 01
er.denc
rv
a
case;
stock
indicate
m peiled to
:
k aN(.K>
n f ma per
first
during September.
October rains
_ j,,- 0 wth to some
, rsidered of much,
"wn^winter feed. In
. r goou, and winter
tiv good food. The
! ; £ j.ier, and other
Native grasses
s m( ', re extensively;
M muc- ; which looks good
r pi p;
,,f cattle is 99 per
complaint is heard in
, )t t h a t cattle have
• w -ell as usual. Ship
'jp, than anticipated
' e ' , . !h voung stuff and
i.pine .^ol<l at sacri
. . time when there is
• t , ; -apply» aml "hen
. needs to hold these
market prices for
cent
on
October
unis
ber
-aiatco
are
••war 1 .'
ra:
fodder, anti other}
Native
ir.ll
nsuai
. «„r-iv.
non
1?
TV.
w ,u
try
dee s and she-stuff
, ?om e encouragement
hut the general price lev-1
T.;'„ from satisfactory- j
■HFFP \XD LAMBS
'"-i maintain a high condition 1
1 . a t 102 per cent on Octo- |
coming «ff ranges
Li Impro'
s
T*!* lift*
- shape, and some bought
- havt been sent to markets.
KLs continued to purchase
rs September, and prices
•. August. Montana
. firm in holding ewe lambs
* ? ;f r a thing. Few lambs will
; ', ; s ; . ta te. but some are run
■ W and old ewes in corn
f rÿ a view of giving more
r Xre marketing. ,
¥F tND LIVESTOCK CONDI-j
f SS IN THE 17 WESTERN
.q'ATES
k Oc*. er report issued from the
■r Regional Office of this Bureavf
k fet the entire season has been
and
93 compared to 91 last
7 a year ago. Sheep
ed their good condition
th being 97 per cent of
■til compared to 94 a year ago.
M V'RTHWEST DISTRICT
■ -Dry weather and hoppers
range, and feeding will be
Hrtt when stock come off range,
Bfer 5 Co— Ranges good, but
short account hoppers. Hay
_ ' ITHWEST DISTRICT
ypitead Co.—Range short in
■ fcrer section account hoppers
■IN* Stock in good condition,
supply.
Co.—Range is a little short
IB**-- account hopper damage,
shipped very close, in
breeding stuff.
■ kSTH CENTRAI, DISTRICT
[y favorable to ranges
i throughout most of the range
The condition of all ranges
omared to 91 a month ago,
The drought
ia N last year.
ite in Texas and Oklahoma
i bes relieved by recent rains,
Ipiwpects for winter feed are now
i Grass has been curing well in
à of the range country', but some
gfflsion is felt in sections where
o is still growing lest severe
I prevent proper curing. Cattle
the excellent condition of
«r rr.
Co-—Ranges good; grass
» Co.— Ranges closely graz
B»*- have been injurious.
Co.— Unusual number of
fi lTe? , an <l immature cattle of
^B^^ bing shipped. Ranges good.
Hr X Liberty Cos. —Ranges and
HB* * excellent condition.
^°~Feed plentiful.
-o.—Range fairly good, but
mjiired it materially.
M itral district
Kt a er .. C ?- Ha >' plentiful win
■g* Î 111 ^ Pood.
BÎwÎT P° 0(1 - and a
fee *l; stock fat but
£^Hf u L c i young stuff be
î t( ' herds being cleaned
- of range feed, corn,!
IEYS
T ^e it home to
Have a packet in
your pocket for an
Wer-feady treat.
R «Mitions conta
hoa and an aid to
i JJ 16 teeth, appetite,
Ike kids.
* •
iV
'""i fi« kn«
\ K
hay and other feeds.
Golden Valley.—Range best in years
and hay abundant. Disposition among
growers to hold stock, but forced
sales are in evidence.
Judith Basin—Good range and win
ter grass, and abundance of hay and
other feed. Cattle shipments heavy,
and include too much young and im
mature stuff forced to market.
Ijewis and Clark—Younger steers
and fat cows being held where possi
ble because of low market prices.
Meagher—Ranges excellent; plenty
of feed.
Wheatland —Range excellent and
stock are fat but soft. Forced sales
include young and breeding stock.
SOUTH CENTRAL DISTRICT
Carbon—Heavy shipments of cattle
sheep and lambs. Hay supply consid
t*red short. Ranges rather poor,
Gallatin—More fat cattle than us
ual, ranges good, and hay plentiful.
Sweet Grass—Ranges good except
for localities where hopeprs have in
jured it but grass is too green. Stock
are in fine shape.
Stillwater—Some ranges below nor
ma I, but plenty of hay. ,
Park—Ranges good. Shipments of
c;i ttle are heavy, reducing herds,
NORTHEAST DISTRICT
j Phillips—Range good, sheep and
lambs being fed in com fields.
j Sheridan—Good grass, and surplus
j G f feed.
Valiev—Some range damaged by
hoppers; feed plentiful.
EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT
Dawson—Ranges grazed close, but
much hay and com. Many herds clos
j i n g out.
McCone—Ranges short, plenty of
feed for winter.
Richland —Ranges short account
j ,hoppers and dry weather, but good
supply com, and hay for winter.
| *SOUTH EAST DISTRICT
Custer—Hay supply adequate, but
j range injured in spots by hoppers and
j drought.
Powder River—Range green, grass
abundant but shorter in some locali
ties. More cattle shipped than last
year.
Rosebud—Ranges fair to good; hay
crop less than 1922 but still sufficient.
Many immature cattle being shipped
under financial pressure.
Carter—Ranges good, with plenty
0 f hay and feed, marketings normal.
-
REDSTONE
Atty. Greer made a short visit in
Redstone Monday.
Jack Burke left Monday for a visit
a t his old home in North Dakota.
Mrs. D. M. Maclnnes was called to
Helena Monday by the serious illness
of her father.
Aug. Goltermann left for St. Peters
Mo., where he was called by the ser
ious illness of his father,
Randell Gray came from Hope, N.
Dak., Tuesday and is visiting with his
brother Henry Gray.
E. J. Johnson was down from
White tail Tuesday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Beardsley left
Monday for Detroit, Mich., where they
expect to make their future home.
During their residence here they have
made many friends here who regret
to see them leave, but will wish them
success in their new home.
H. R. Raether of Froid was a Red
stone business visitor Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Selmer Cornelius who
have been in Minneapolis for the past
couple of years returned here Monday
to make their home. Selmer has ac
cepted his former position with the
; Engebritson Hdw. Co. Selmer says
| be was never satisfied back east but
always had a continuel longing to get
back To the west again and especially
to Redstone.
Mr. and Mrs. Jake Ness are the
proud parents of a 7 pound girl baby
which arrived at their home Sunday
morning.
doing nicely.
Dr. Ehlers the Scobey vterinary,
| was here Wednesday and inspected a
j C ar load of horses for C. B. Bull ■which
j be will ship today from Daleview for
Mother and daughter are
market in Iowa.
Mrs. Garneau of Plentywood will
play the piano for the dance to be
given here Saturday evening for the
benefit of the Ladies Basket Ball
Team.
V
Ir.
if..
r .

a
*
{
1
i
A Hallowe'en Sale
On
Off
Per
Cent
40
All
Phonograph Records
Calculate the Saving and Make Your Purchase Now
i iPPF ASSORTMENT— CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTAL, POPULAR IN
stpomfnt AI COMICS MUSICAL AND SPEAKING RECORDS; SONGS:
sSK^uctsSÎTssical, popular, sacred, sentimental and
OF THE OPPORTUNITY TO REFRESH YOUR
The
Jeweler
COMIC.
TAKE ADVANTAGE
CATALOGUE OF RECORDS
A. Amundsen
LABOR MUST
DEFEND LABOR
While the rank and file of organized
labor is contributing time and money
the defense of W. Z, Foster and
other members of organized labor
criminally arrested by federal author
ities in
. a raid at Bridgman, Mich.,
œ s - 10 be <le Pl° re <i that part of the
officialdom of the labor movement
loses no opportunity to put these
workers in the most unfavorable light
possible.
It is the right of every official and
every member of organized labor to
disagree with Foster and those who
believe as he does. It is also the
right of Foster and his followers to
disagree with every official and with
members of organized labor.
With logic lacking to answer the
arguments for amalgamation and in
dependent political action, no good
will is to be aroused for those who
differ with Foster and his ideas by
attempting to make it appear that
Foster and his associates have never
done anything constructive for the
labor movement, and are a menace to
it.
. Foster was years ago a member of
the I. W. W. He toured Europe in
working class fashion. He studied
the labor movements of that contin
ent and returned to this country con
vinced that dual organizations like
the I. W. W. were a menace to the
welfare of the labor movement.
Acting as he believed he left the
I. W. W. and became a staunch mem
ber of the American Federation of
Labor. For a while he was the prize
boy with the A. F. of L. officialdom.
He was asked to contribute and did
contribute articles to the Federation
ist, official organ of the American
Federation of Labor. .
Things went smoothly until it be
came apparent that while Foster was
an opponent of dual unionism, he be
lieved that there should be one union
for each industry and that the A. F.
of L. should work to bring about this
needed change in organization. Then
the ardor of officialdom for Foster
commenced to cool.
That these unions in later years
were unable to meet the onslaught of
the employers was not the fault of
Foster but of those who insisted in
the disintegration of a council that
had been formed to bring more united
action among the packing house un
ions.
In the big organizing campaign in
the steel industry, it was Foster who
was intrusted with its leadership by
the international union officials,
though the campaign did not succeed,
it was the strongest move ever put
forth by unorganized workers in a
trustified industry operating at many
points. *
Had the money necessary to put
on the campaign at all pbints at once
been forthcoming, as it was under
Al
j
S T ° P
tod
AT
RAYON'S GARAGE
And get that grade of oil for your tractor or car, at prices
that you will buy. Remember we have a battery for ev
ery car—a part for every battery. Agency for Overland
and Star Automobiles, Fisk and Federal Tires.
SAMSON and RUMELY TRACTORS
stood it would be from interested in
ternationals, victory would have been
achieved.
But forced, thru shortage of funds,
to put on an intensive campaign at
one point, while little or nothing was
done at other points it proved a hand
icap that could not be. overcome.
Men organized at one point would
become restless and demand action.
Finally this culminated in a premature
strike. Premature for the reason that
the money was lacking to send suf
ficient organizers to all points where
steel was manufactured at the same
time. . v
As the membership of the steel un
grew the amount designated for
work increased.
ions
the organization
And today an organization campaign
is being conducted in the steel indus
try by the A. P. of L. with $<0,000.00
left over from the campaign which
Foster managed.
Could that $70,000.00 have been
available at the start of the steel or
ganizing campaign led by Foster, it
is most probable that it w r ould have
culminated in complete success.
Foster and those who believe him
often assailed for their friendli
toward Soviet Russia. It is
worthy of notice that conservative
United States senators return from
Russia w r ith praise and commenda
tion for improving conditions in Rus
sia.
are
ness
It also should not be passed without
consideration that one of the greatest
influence against dual unionism in
the United States has come from the
leaders of the soviets. Radicals who
could not be influenced by the con
servative A. F. of L. officials have
been influenced to stay in the A. F. of
L. where they belong by the leaders
of the Russian movement.
And in this fight against dual \m
ionism none has been more active
and loyal than Foster.
It is the influence of Foster to
with the opposition to dual
ism by Russian radicals, that as much
and more than anything else is to be
credited with checking the headway
of dualism in the United States.
Foster and those arrested with him
at Michigan face pealties of from one
to ten years in prison under the stone
svndicalist law of Michigan.
age -
They face that penalty not for any
thing they were doing to promote
their own selfish purpose but for what
they conceived to be for the benefit
of the workers of the entire nation.
Hounded and harried by a govern
ment and employers hostile to organ
ized labor, it is astounding to see la
bor officials joining the wolf pack that
would send Foster and the others to
the dungeon.
It is the right of every worker and
official to disagree with Foster, but it
is also the duty of every worker and
official to defend members of organ
ized labor when persecuted by those
employers and that government that
have attacked and assailed organized
labor at every opportunity.
Try a Want Ad, it brings results^
DECISION WEAKENS
SYNDICALISM LAW
Los Angeles. —The decision
Judge Frederick Houser of the appel
late court granting a new trial in the
case of Felix Thornton, is considered
by many legal authorities to be a
body-blow to the criminal snydicalism
law as at present interpreted. Several
times previously
been acquitted because the superior
court judged that mere membership
in the I. W. W. was not sufficient to
justify conviction; but this is the first
time this ruling has been made by an
appeal judge.
Thornton's case may be appealed by
the prosecution to the state supreme
court to obtain a final test ruling.
of
defendants have
Û
good/year
Service Station
*
*
O other tire has
the slipless grip
of the famous Good
year All-Weather
Tread. Its high,
thick, sharp-edged
blocks grip hard,
hold fast, and hang
on. The result is a
steady,sure,safe
pace in any traffic or
N
in any going,
a car and tire per
formance perfectly
matched for eco
nomical efficiency.
A• Goodyear Service Station
Dealer » woe tell and recom
mend the new Goodyear
Cord» with the beveled All
Weather Tread and back
them up with etandard
Goodyear Service
O. M. DONALDSON
JOE REDMOND
Plentywod, Montana.
*
GOODYEAR
i*?
i
T
>
r
r
x
FARMERS: ""CORN IS THE KEY
yj
"It is the unanimous opinion of every person who has made a study
of the situation and of the Sheridan County farmers problems, THAT
CORN IS THE KEY to the prosperity of this section of the country.
The Corn acreage of Sheridan County has quadrupled the past
season—Every Community is having its Corn Show—
Helland-Strand Hardware, always abreast of the times has as usual
anticipated the needs of the farmers in this new farming phase, and has
on hand a supply of
« »
•* »
i 4
Come and see our line and you will
find the prices right. They provide
speed and comfort to an otherwise
irksome task.
Built t o save you time and effort—
they are the last word in practical
economy and are made to fit. If
you have a husking bee the husky
buskers will appreciate this time
saver.
"I
[t
—PRICES—
AS LOW AS
AS HIGH AS
Helland-Strand
THE OLD RELIABLE STORE".
CIVIL SERVCE EXAM
ON NOVEMBER 17
TO FILL VACANCY IN PLENTY
WOOD POSTOFFICE— SALARY
$1400 PER ANNUM.
The United States Civil Service
nounces a Postoffice Clerk-Carrer ex
amination, to be held on November 17,
1923, for the purpose of establishing
an eligible register from which selec
tions may be made to fill vacancies as
hey may occur in the position of Clerk
or Carrier, Postoffice Service, Plenty
wood, Montana. Salary, $1400 per
annum.
All citizens of the United States
an
I Batteries
WILLARD
Service Station
It is time to have the batteries Looked After, Cleaned
Repaired and
RECHARGED
A Stitch In Time Saves Nine—to have your batteries
taken care of when they should be will
J
Save Time and Money
*
WE ARE BATTERY EXPERTS—HAVE YOUR
CAR REPAIRED NOW
MOTOR INN
Garage
WILLARD
Service Station
. SIMON SWANSON, Proprietor
who meet the requirements, both men
and women, may enter this examina
tion; appointing officers, however,
have the legal right to specify the sex
desired in requesting certification of
eligibles. Age limits, 18 to 45 years
on the date of the examination. Age
limits do not apply to persons entitled
to preference on account of military
or naval service.
For further information and appli
cation blank apply to The Postmaster,
local secretary, board of civil service
examiners, at Plentywood, Montana,
or to the Secretary, Eleventh U. S.
Civil Service District, 303 Postoffice
Building, Seattle, Washington. __
THE SECRETARY,
Eleventh U. S. Civil Service District,
303 Postoffice Building,
Seattle, Washington.

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