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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, November 09, 1923, Image 8

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MONTANA SHIPS
OUT BEAVER FUR
VALUED AT $50,000
TREASURE STATE, THOUGH
SHORN OF PAST GLORY, STILL
FIGURES AS PRODUCER.
Oct. 27.—While Montana
Helena,
long ago dropped from the position
she held as a fur producing country
the pre- territorial, or even territorial
days, she is still contributing some
what to the fur trade although her
offerings are now confined largely to
the pelts of the beaver and the lesser
valued coyote.
While civilization and the trapper
have wiped out the bulk of her fur
bearing animals there has been ship
ped out of the state during the pres
ent calendar year approximately $50,
000 worth of beaver skins, as it is
shown by the records in the office of
the state fish and game commission.
Under the state law which restricts
heaver trapping to those holding state
permits and which requires the tag
ging of every beaver skin taken, there
has been registered since January 1,
1023. 4,370 beaver skins. These skins
ranged in value from $4 to $20 pci
pelt, with an average value of $10.
Practically all of these skins have been
shipped out of the state, either tbtu
puichase by local or eastern fur hous
es, or through shipment to some out
of-the-state furrier for making up in
to garments.
Under the existing state law the
beaver is protected except in the case
where a permit is issued by the state
warden to an individual to kill
where
where the
game
beaver on his own premises
they are doing damage, or
beaver are taken by a state trapper
acting in the place of the owner of
th< jn every instance the pelt must be
sent to the office of the state game
warden where a metal number tag is
attached and a fee of 50 cents collect
ed for each bine so registered and
tagged. In the time this law has been
in effect there have been registered,
since January 25, 1922, 7178 beaver
When so tagged the beaver
can be sold, shipped or traded within
I he state, but a special permit must
obtained for shipment out of the
state All skins found or shipped out
of 2 the state in violation of the law or
which have not been reported and
tagged within 60 days of the expira
tion of the permit, are subject to seiz
and sale by the state game war.
skins
be
ure
den
Shipment to market of th(yskins 0 .
the muskrat have been very light from
the state during the past year as that
animal is now under protection until
November 1, 1925, except m ca.es
where a permit has been issuer, by the
game warden on a showing that they
arc damaging dams, ditches or reser
There are no restrictions upon the
trading or sale of the hides of the
marten, otter, fox, sable or fisher, pro
viding thev are legally taken dunng
the open season which extends from
November 1 to April 1, following.
WHO OWNS THE
CAPITALIST PARTIES?
î WASHINGTON.—"I don't re- *
member how much I contributed
■* to either the Republican or the +
* Democratic campaign funds, but #
* 1 know I gave to both, said Har
* ry Sinclair, testifying before the
* senate committee investigating *
* his secret private lease of the •
* Teapot Dome naval oil reserve.
* Sinclair, most spectacular of
* all the oil kings since Rockefel
* 1er, spoke to the committee 1I V r a
* low, silky, rather bored tone. He
* gave the impression of a man
* willing to forgive this vulgar in
* trusion into his private affairs,
* because the senators didn't have ^
* any better taste.
♦ * ♦
*
For
«
Protection
Against
Fire, Lightning, Cy
clone, Windstorm
Get a
POLICY
in
the
NORTH WESTERN
NATIONAL
For Rates
See "Jerry" the lit
tle agent.
Call or Address
G. G. POWELL
Plentywood, Mont.
• FRENCH WORKERS
OPPOSE RI HR •
* PARIS.—The council of the *
* French General Confederation of *
* Labor has passed a resolution, *
* saying that at the moment, when *
* Germany has ceased passive re- *
* sistance and recognized her obli- *
* gâtions to make reparation, the *
* council demands cessation of mili- *
* tary occupation which is ruinous *
* for Germany and unprofitable for *
* the allies, and asks for the im- *
* mediate opening of negotiations. *
*

BIG STOCK RUSTLING
CASE IS ON AT POPLAR
Abe Dale, Well Known in Roosevelt
County Tried for Cattle Hustling—
Attorneys Howard Lewis of This
City and McConnell of Poplar De
fending Dale.
DALE FOUND NOT GUILTY
Poplar, Oct. 25.—Judge Comer op
ened the special term of district court
here Tuesday, and the entire day Tues
day and Wednesday till 3 o'clock were
consumed in empaneling a jury. There
are four criminal cases and eight civil
cases. »
The first, a criminal case, is the
State against Abe Dale, and concerns
20 head of cattle which were stolen
from Mrs Anna Hartkopf, a woman
living north of Brockton. Abe Dale is
accused of offering a price for the cat
tle to Bennie Burshia and a man
named Nig Smith, and Burshia and
his wife ad Smith are alleged to have
delivered the cattle to Dale, as per
agreement.
The case began Wednesday after
noon, with Attorney Lewis of Plenty
wood and Attorney McConnell of Pop
lar represetning the defense and Coun
ty Attorney L. A. Brown for the state.
Considerable trouble was had in se
lecting the jury. The following men
were finally drawn for that duty; Ar
chelaus DeTienne, A. D. Picard of
Bainville. Andrew Leutsch and Harry
Walker of Poplar, J. . Maher of Bre
rette, Ross Tdmon and Carl Swanson
of Froid, Nels P. Hanson, Charles
Hawkins and Chris Peterson of Cul
bertson and E. W. Montgomery and
Edward Petei'son of Wolf Point. As
sociated with Attorney Brown in the
Abe Dale case is Frauk Lavigne, dep
uty state stock inspector.
LATER
JURY FREES SUSPECT IN BEEF
THEFT CASE; MANY FACE
COUNTS.
Poplar, Oct. 29.—Jn the cattle steal
ing case which has been absorbing
the interest of Poplar people the past
few days, Abe Dale was acquitted, the
jury taking only 20 minutes to render
its decision.
Dal ewas accused of instigating the
stealing of the cattle, while Bennie
Burshia and Jordan Smith did the act
ual stealing. Several witnesses .were
brought a distance of 40 miles or more
th elast day, and the summing up
filled the court room to overflowing.
County Attorney Brown made a
strong appeal for conviction, saying
that if leniency with alleged offenders
of tils sort only encouraged others to
break into the game.
The next case on the docket is that
of Bennie Burshia, who will be tried
for the stealing of the cattle already
mentioned in the Dale case. This case
should not take long, as by him own
confession he stole the cattle. • Th
Jordan Smith case will come immedi
ately after Burshia's and he is being
tried for the same offense.
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A Quiet Dinner
, The next time you want to give Her a real treat,
bring Her here and let us serve you one of our
tasty, well-cooked Dinners.
It will open the way to confidences and—but come
and see how' cozy we can fix you up—almost like
eating in a home of your own.
>
TRY ONE OF OUR DELICIOUS
DINNERS ANY EVENING
CITY CAFE
HARRY KOIKE, Prop.
LABOR BUREAU SENT
5,000 MEN TO HELP
IN ANNUAL HARVEST
Great Falls Office Placed 1,902 Men,
According to Field Director—
Branch Line Takes Hundreds
of Laborers from Bainville
to Scobey
Helena, Oct. 30.—During the
cent harvest season over 5,000 men
Bdirected to employment in Mon
tana by the federal-state co-operative
employment offices, according to a
statement received by the state de
partment of agriculture from George
E. Tucker, field director of the farm
labor bureau of the U. S. employment
service. The state department pro
vided offices and equipment while the
bureau furnished the
re
were
farm labor
agents.
Frqm the recruiting office at Wilhs
ton 1,361 men were directed to the
wheat areas in Montana, and from
Minot 562 men. The Bainville office
cleared 1,736 men, distributed as fol
lows: Scobev branch 530; Poplar 340;
Glasgow 128; Malta 143; Harlem 243;
Great Falls 262 and Lewistown 90.
The Great Falls office cleared 1992
men who were distributed as follows:
Great Falls 365; Lewistown 424; Fort
Benton 271; Sun River 126; Mocassin
267; Bozeman 92.
Providing congress sees fit to give
the U. S. employment service suffi
cient funds, it is the intention of the
farm labor bureau, in co-operation
with the division of labor of the state
department of agriculture, to operate
more extensively in Montana next
I
season.
The assistant field director of the
service spent six week in Montana,
making a careful survey of conditions
and the most suitable points for es
tablishing harvest labor offices, so that
if the fund are available the farm
labor bureau will be prepared for an
enlarged and improved service.
ERICKSON S HAT
NOT YET IN RING
MAY DECIDE IN 60 OR 90 DAYS—
MEANTIME TALK OF CANDI
DACY IS UNCHECKED.
Great Falls, Oct. 2ft.—Judge J. E.
Erickson of Kalispell, prominently
mentioned as a candidate for the Dem
ocratic nomination for governor in
the primaries next year, is quoted in
the loral press as saying:
It is just a little premature for
I don't believe in
u
any announcement,
lengthy political contests, an do mat
ter how short they are, they always
seem long. I may be a candidate but
there will be no definite announcement
for some time. Perhaps in 60 or 90
days I may decide to 'throw my hat
into the political ring,' but right now
I have made no decision."
A member of the last legislature,
commenting upon the statement of the
judge, remarked that dunng the re
cent session none other than W. J.
(Tinplate Bill) Brennan upon one oc
casion at least pointed out the Kalis
pell jurist as "our next candidate for
governor.
Hotel lobby talk in Butte also has
been credited with centering upon
Judge Erickson as the Democratic
standard bearer in Montana in 1924
and it is understood he will have con
siderable backing in the mining center.
Advertisers Attention—
The Producers News is read by
5,000 people in Sheridan County alone.

SEN. FRAZIER SAYS
FARMER PROTEST GROW
* WASHINGTON. — "Potatoes *
* are bringing 18 cents a bushel in *
* North Dakota, at the railway *
* shipping point, and it costs me *
* 17 cents to put them in the pit *
* on my farm," said Sen. Lynn *
* Frazier, former • Nonpartisan *
* League governor of North Dako- *
* ta, on his arrival here to begin *
* his six-year term in the upper *
* house.
* potatoes in the ground I it would *
* not pay to dig them. Hundreds *
* of acres of potatoes in the state *
* are not going to be taken from *
* the hill." *
* Frczier cited this among other *
* indications of the farmers' present *
* condition, and he predicted that *
* the storm of political protest that *
* has been
rising throughout the *
country Mill continue to grow in *
* power until the farmers are *
granted relief. *
*
I have left 20 acres of *
*
*
Lynn Haines Wants
Progressive Coalition
(By the Federated Press)
WASHINGTON.—Coalition of the
Republican progressives, Farmer- La
tentes, independents and Democrats
in the new senate, for immediate con
trol of all committees, as a means to
prompt legislation in the interest of
the producers, is suggested, in the
current issue of Lynn Haines' Spot
light," formerly the ' Searchlight," is
sued here.
Haines proposes that the 34 senate
committee, both as to chairmanships
and majority control, be divided up
a basis of numbers between the 43
Democrats and the 11 to 14 progres
ive-independents. His plan of chair
manship reorganization against the
old guard includes:
Agriculture, Norris, Rep.; appro
priations, Simmons, Dem.; replacing
Warren, Rep.; finance, La Follette,
Rep., for Smoot, Rep.; foreign rela
tions, Borah, Rep., for Lodge, Rep.;
immigration, Ralston, Dem., for Colt,
Rep.; interstate commerce, Brook
hart, Rep., for Cummins, Rep.
The value of the manufacturing
plants of the General Electric Compa
ny has increased from approximately
$4,000,000 in 1893, to $167,000,000 in
1923, and the square feet of factory
floor space from 400,000 to over 25,
000,000 (on Dec. 31, 1922). The num
ber of employes has grown from 4,000
to over 74,000.
In current year to Oct. 15, Co'^er
Export association has sold, 268,300,
000 lbs. copper at average price of
14.93 cents per pound.
Try a Want Ad, it brings results.
Wi
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For the Carpenter or
The Home Mechanic
Good, sharp Tools not only make the task eas
ier to do, but they aid you in turning out a bet
ter piece of work.
The Tools we offer for your approval are the
highest quality we can get, yet the prices are
very moderate.
Zeidler Hardware
if «
WATKIN S SERVICE
*
V
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A
YOU ARE RIGHT AND YOU ARE SAFE
WHEN YOU DEMAND ANY ONE OF THE
WATKINS 137 PRODUCTS. OUR MEDICINES
AND SALVES HAVE PROVED THEIR MERIT
FOR 55 YEARS. WATKINS LINIMENT CAN
NOT BE BEAT. WATKINS MENTHOL CAM
PHOR FOR SORE THROAT. MUSTARD
OINTMENT FOR RHEUMATIC PAINS. COLD
AND GRIPPE TABLETS FOR YOUR FIRST
COLD. EACH AND EVERY ARTICLE IS THE
BEST THAT CAN BE PRODUCED.
REMEMBER—ANY VANILLA EXTRACT IS
INFERIOR TO WATKINS-THE STANDARD
•IF IT DOES NOT CONTAIN 50 PER CENT
VANILLA.
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J. M. NIELSON
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RETAILER IN SHERIDAN COUNTY
DEPRESSION HITS
NEW ENGLAND STATES
/
By HAY JONES
Federated Press Staff Correspondent
BOSTON.—Curtailment of produc
tion which has hit the textile work
er» of New England so hard dunng
the last three months, is spreading
into other industries. The latest to
feel the blow is the shoe center of
Brockton. , .
The Keith and Douglas plants, the
largest in Brockton, are running rag
time" five half days a week. Most of
the other factories are on a similar
basis. Several are shut down entire
ly, and only two or three small fac
a,Ä
j entirely.
, j n contrast, the fancy shoe indus
| try, with its main center in Haver
j hill, is working full time, and sev- !
I eral of the crafts are reported as |
short of workers.
The sole leather workers of Boston
are still on strike and the entire lo
cal industry is tied up. The plants in
Haverhill have signed the union agree
ment and are turning out cut soles
for the shoes factories controlled by
the Shoe Workers Protective union,
whose contract provides that 0s mem
bers shall not work on any material
from a factory where a strike is on.
This strike extends an arm into Penn
sylvania where a branch of the Arm
our Leather Co. is nourishing a strike
in its tenth week.
Mills of Lumber Export Associa
tion booked two months ahead on
Japanese orders placed before the ;
earthquake, and companies not in
dined to accept additional orders.
To know
how good a cigarette
really can be mad^
you must try a
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44 IT'S TOASTED
Hi
MINERS' UNION WILL
PROTEST WAGE CUT
IN MONTANA FIELD
PRESIDENT AWAITING ADVICES
FROM THIS STATE BEFORE
asking parle* with
OWNERS.
— - akgFTES Oct. 27.— C. H.
president of the International
fjo? ' P Workers, now in Los
Union of Met;ai vvoir . 50 . cent
Angeles, saadjoday tn« . Butte
«tetom Falls, Montana,
" „««ncod vesterdav as effec
*?e lds ' *nember '11, inall ' likelihood
Hve Nov ^ with a protest from* the
would be
union. ad( jedthat he was awaiting
Moyer adtledthat lg in Mon .
^*". s P " taking any action and
SSlÜÄS tWadvices to-day.
,t,
'f^^s^*^********** ** * ♦ * * * ** *
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Range 2,000 Miles

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This Outfit Has Received Messages From The
Following Stations:
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LOS ANGELES. CAL.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.
FORT WORTH, TEXAS,
OMAHA, NEBR.
SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK.
CALGARY, ALBERTA, CAN.
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This Outfit Comes Complete Ready To Install
No Extras To Buy. Ask For Demonstration
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—AT THE
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<>» 1 « 4» 4 ♦ » t « if 1 ♦ fr fr 4 1 < "4 " fr ♦ ' I 1 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 4 ' * 44*
We have the best equip
ped line of Drugs and
Accessories in Northeast
ern Montana
At The
Plentywood Drug
0
or
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(2

ARTHUR W. ERICKSON
Attomey-at-Law
Practice In All Court*
Plentywood, Montana
J. C. STORKAN
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Special Attention
Given To
EYE, EAR, NOSE & THROAT •
Optical Defects *
Accurately Corrected *
PLENTYWOOD
*
*
*
*
MONTANA *
FUNERAL. IRECTOR
LICENSE EMBALM»"
W. L. BRUCE
Prompt attention given to
city and out of town calls.
Lady Assistant. Herse
*
*
*
* *
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J. G. DEBING
Abstracter
PLENTYWOOD ABSTRACT CO. •
Office In Vollum Building.
Plentywood
«
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Montana. •
Residence Phone 165
Plentywood, Mont
*******
*
*
barber SHOP
For Better Service
Shaves 2w
THE WHITE
ONSTAD & GREER
LAWYERS
Plentywood, Montana
Hair Cuts 60c
All other work at Proportionately
Baths
low prices.
Ladies' Massage
ShamP*
Hair Singe
LOUIS MOE, Prop
HOWARD M. LEWIS
Make Your Headquarters
I RLA ND HOTEL
PLENTYW00 D
CONVENIENCES
LAWYER
WHEN IN
MODERN
HELLAND-STRAND
Supplies, Embalming
and Hearse.
Plentywood, Mont.
Undertaking
• ■ ' iV'
• Electric Lighted Steam He* «
• GRAND VIEW HOTEL ,
• 'The Travelers Homeon the .
PHILLIP BOUBASSA, W
Rooms With Running
• And Bath •
• Sample Boom In *
• PLENTYWOOD, MONT ; ,
• •••••
*
«
*
«
* *
♦ curing 11 THIS Abstractman *
♦ SHERIDAN COUNTY AB- •
* n . £T R d CT COMPANY
* Only TOie Best Abstracts Of Title *
Plentywood, Montana
*•♦••• « *
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He said, however, hp u«
mi*ht be possible to arrant % it
ence between the mine
■ i ï ach a «»Sr 8 ^
Senator Johnson Raul, (v
Hogs to South " ^
Sl Paul
Senator Magnus lohne
to South St. Paul from T S* k
day and sold his fall h 0 ^ mbal1 Pri
Johnson drove approxiri.
f rom his Meeker count? fÏL? «e«
tor truck and insisted he g e ÏÏ
for his hogs. A„,| h "
seived $6.75 a hundred
that weighed 2,370 pounds iï h °»
ducting his expenses, he
check for $154.47. Senat«* 8 P* 6 ® »
finished his business about V ohns <*
went over a nea ^° Ul "»•" aiuj
restaurant, pcrchcil himself
ter stool and dined
ar
coun.

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