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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, July 18, 1924, Image 6

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Page Six
thereby enabled to furnish each
tested timepiece with a government !
To ascertain the accuracy of a
timepiece it is placed in a large glass
front refrigerator, equipped with auto
mntic devices that keep the tempera
ture at a fixed point, in which the
watch "runs" for stated pertods at va
rlous degrees of heat and cold. When
the regulator has been set. the flow
of cold air from the ice chest above
the watch chamber is controlled by a |
thermostatic device, and, when neces
sary, warm air is Introduced from the
outside. The tliree temperatures at
which all watches undergoing the test i
are kept are 45, 70 and 95 degrees
To qualify in "class A" a watch must
not vary more than four or five sec
ends from correct time, and, in addi
tion, it must be able to repeat its per
*— ■» « »»firCe
under varying conditions. In all there
are eleven specifications in the test,
of them Involving technical cal
Any variance made by the watches
under test from correct time is record
ed by means of a chronograph,—Wash
ington Star.
Timepieces Are Given
Most Rigorous Tests
Anyone may send his watch to the
bureau of standards for a test to as
certain whether it qualifies as a time
piece of the highest grade, designated
This privilege is used
chiefly by watch manufacturers, who
as "class A.
ure
certificate.
Fahrenheit.
some
dilations.
Italian Genius Came to
a • » t p L / ihrnrv
/UÖ or nrilisn i^iorury
The British museum library is the
first library of the modern world.
Like many other British Institutions,
it owes much of Its greatness to a
foreigner, Anthony Panizzi, a renegade
Italian. Born at Modena in 1797,
Panizzi became a student at Parma,
and then joined a revolutionary move
ment in his native duchy.
The revolution failed and Panizzi
first to Switzerland and then
in destitute
fled;
v across Europe, arriving
condition in London. He became a
teacher of Italian, received an appoint
ment at the library, and came into
power as its keeper in the first year of
Queen Victories reign.
At that time the library, which had
been founded in 1753, was languishing
for want of intelligent supervision. It
contained a valuable collection of
some 250,000 books, but the catalogu
ing and arrangements for reference
were bad. *
When Panizzi left its service, some
thirty years later, it contained 650,000
volumes, housed under a single dome.
This dome, which is second only in size
to that of St. Peter's, Rome, was one
of the many clever ideas of Panizzi,
who was altogether a remarkable ebar
He was knighted some time
acter.
before his death in 1879.
Not to Be Outdone
It was the last day of school before
annual spring vacation and a teacher
in trie junior high school at Anderson
having little success with a class
was
of pupils whose thoughts were bent
the vacation than on studies.
more on
With the training of a first-rate school
mistress she feigned that all was well
with her, but school children are not
"fooled" by a teacher.
Just as the last class of the day ad
journed. she made this remark to the
students :
"I hope you all have a very enjoy
able spring vacation, and hope that
when you come back you'll be in your
right minds—
»»
"Same to you," the children replied
in unison.—Indianapolis News.
Fruitful Land
It has been said that there is no
place in South Africa where some va
riety fruit will not grow and thrive.
Apples, apricots, avocado pears, ba
cherrtes, gooseberries, figs,
nanas,
grapefruit, lemons, limes, pineapples,
plums, quinces, melons, olives, oranges
and peaches are grown In the Union on
a commercial scale.
One of the greatest advantages held
by South Africa as a fruit exporting
country is that, owing to its geographi
cal position, Its products reach the
British market In the off season, and
also reach the United States.
may
The trade has been remunerative de
spite heavy spoilage.
Guard Against Poison
There are many schemes for mark
ing poison bottles, but here Is one of
the safest and best. By the simple
means of pasting a strip of sandpaper
over the face of bottles containing poi
son, says Science and Invention, the
danger of getting a bottle by mistake,
even on account of darkness, is ellm- j
inated. Persons grasping the bottle |
will receive no discomfort, but will
get sufficient warning as to Its poison
ous contents. Most of the body of
the bottle should be covered with
sandpaper. A small label designat
ing the poison should be pasted some
where above the sandpaper.
His Hard Luck
"Take a chance on a raffle, will ya?'
asked the stranger.
"No, sir," replied Levi. "1 nevei
took but one chance on a raffle and 1
won that time.'
Well, if you are lucky, why don'i
take another chance?" asked tin
<<
you
stranger.
Never will ! take another chance oi
a raffle," announced Levi.
I took the chance a man raffled off i
house, a lot. a horse, a wagon, a cov
and a hog. And I won the hog."—Oln
clnnatl Enquirer.

'The tlrm
ur.JL.
Experiments have been made in a
speclally devised tank, in order to test
S truih ot man, 'stories ,.14
octopi attacking human beings an
dragging them to the sea bottom. In
the tank with the octopus expert-1
mented with there was placed a "dum
my " 0 f the same specific gravity as a
man, and this was baited with a crab,
Attracted by this tempting morsel,
the octopus made for the figure.
se i ze d it in its powerful tentacles
and tried to drag it under water, but j
without success. It then went to one
side 0 f the tank and, holding onto
the edge of the glass with some of
its arras, It dragged its prey beneath
the surface and crushed the crab
she „ with its powerful Jaws. j
it is believed that fliese expert- ;
ments afford proof that the octopus
can drag its victims far below the
surface of the water only near rocks
to which it can attach its "suckers." j
There is one spot in the Bay of Naples
where these creatures attain a large
s i ze , and now and then a fisherman
j S reported missing. It is thought that
such disappearances are due to the
r nfo r a,e ,,mn ' s , - ,n * eai,sht
i eg i, y a concealed octopus and
dragged under water. In the case of
such a repulsive and powerful crea
ture as the octopus, it is difficult to
separate fact from fiction. '
Experiments Show How
Octopus Secures Prey
Victory Achieved in
Keeping Soul Young
Byron reminds us that "time writes
no wrinkles on the azure brow of the
, ocean „ but can we say that there is
| any other brow anywhere upon which
he does not place his tell-tale marks?
Me look into the glass with a close
scrutiny some day and the face that
greets us there shows unmistakable
And yet we wonder If it is quite
right to blame all that we see In the
glass on Time, when we think of the
needless worry and fret with which
we crowd our lives. But the brow of
signs of his passing.
a It not possible keep j
It free from the furrows and sears and
wrinkles that are left elsewhere?
Even if we have to allow that the
weight of the years and the years'
cares and responsibilities and disap
pointments must bend down the frame
a little, and take from the step some
thing of its elasticity, might we not
hope that the soul would be able to
keep young and fresh and buoyant
through all the years?
If we could manage to keep the soul
young, why need we care what else
may happen? If we could learn the
secret of how that could be done
would it not be one of the finest les
sons we had learned all our life
through ?—Exchange.
Got u Peeping Tom"
Something exceedingly antique and
rare In the legal line was presented in
Rochdale, England, when a young man
was arraigned In the magistrate's
court on the charge of "unlawfully lis
tening by night under walls, windows
and eaves of Rochdale infirmary, to
hearken after the discourse, and there
from to frame slanders and mischiev
ous tales." He resisted capture when
caught up a spout looking through the
nurses' sitting-room window and was
struck on the head with a hammer by
an Infirmary official, says the Cincin
nati Enquirer. The charge was pre
ferred under an old common law re
specting "night walkers and eavesdrop
pers.
»*
SIX-CYLINDER LOVE" COMING
Popular Broadway Success to Open Chautauqua.
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'Six Cylinder Love," William Anthony McGuire's comedy that had a phenomenal 54 straight weeks run
in New York, has been selected to open Chautauqua. While It is one big laugh from start to finish, Its theme
Is one that strikes a home run for nine families out of ten.
The villain in "Six Cylnder Love" does a lot of dirty work and breaks up two families. He attracts
sunshine friends," patronizes road houses, teaches extravagance, and has an Insatiable appetite for gas
oline. Yes—an automobile—you've guessed It. An automobile that a young couple could not afford—and
which led them as well as the second couple who bought It Into all sorts of difficult and humorous
situations.
«
"Six Cylinder Love" lets the full light of sane reason fall upon the orgy of extravagance In which
American families are Indulging in this age of motordom. While it carries a lesson—it Is so excruciatingly
funny and has such clever lines and situations, that It Is Just one long laugh from beginning to final curtate.
It is well staged and has a splendid cast of well-known stage favorites coached by Ellas Day, famous
Chicago coach.
WILL BE AT PLENTYWOOD CHAUTAUQUA, AUGUST 10-1S—On Opening Day
NOTICE FROM THE COUNTY
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
As patrons quite frequently call at
my office and are disappointed at not
finding me in, I am taking this op
pertunity to advise that the County
'a
mon ^h and my present office days are
Saturdays and the last Friday of
cach mon th. On those days all other
work is made secondary to conference
with callers. But while these are the
only days that one may bo sure of
finding me in, I am at the office on
my th ab f ence an assistant oheVfully
waits upon callers t0 t ho best of her
ability. This notice is merely for the
information of those who might be ■
under the impression that every day |
is a n office day for the County Sup
enntendent. I am always sorry io t
heax, that soma one has made a trip j
R espeC tfully
' ' EMMA CRONE.
_
Certain merchants in Plentywood
wou j,i destroy your free press by a
boycott—the only way to answer
them is by r> similar boycott—Who is
the best man the business men boy
cotters or the farmers? If you want
a press, show these sma 1 own
& mä
n „ gs shyste rs will never try to con
tro j your press again.
MONTANA WEATHER
AND CROP REPORT
_
Helena, July 14.—The dry weather
' bn*
j
! for the week ending July 5th
; made all corn and other backward)
i «JP g S V ed by the^Än^of pS"
; lidt f th . Department for the week
1 endiag j uly 5th Very litt i e damage
j bas occurred as yet from grasshop
j ne rs and only one
damage from hail.
1 ties are as follows;
j
j - -
j or able plant £ù o\
j Mfalfa put up.
county repoi'ted
Repeats bv coun
Northwestern District
Lincoln—Weather too hot for fav
First cutting
Rye bring cut for
:,T.
- j
-
Call For Precinct Caucuses
Precinct Caucuses for the purpose of electing
County Delegates to the Farmer-Labor County Con
vention to be held in Plentywood, Mont. JULY 24,
1924, is hereby called for SATURDAY, JULY 19,
1924.
Every precinct is requested to send one delegate
and one alternate. Credentials must show that the
delegates are members of the Farmer-Labor party of
Montana.
IMPORTANT
Every precinct committeeman should see to that
his precinct is represented at the County Convention
and should call for Precinct Caucuses immediately.
Remember that the precinct caucuses are on
SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1924 and the County Con
vention is hereby called to convene in Plentywood,
Montana, JULY 24th, at 10 o'clock A. M., for the
purpose of endorsing candidates for county offices to
run on the Farmer-Labor ticket.
RODNEY SALISBURY,
County Chairman, Farmer-Labor Party.
■I
hay. Barley and oats heading out.
Labor supply greater than demand.
North Central District
weather.
out than ever before.
very good. .
Hill—Weather quite wann .
com growing very well. M heat i -
mg. General crop condition, v. •
Laoor situation at sto.iHi.-<.
weather, crops
growing fine.' Prospects never better.
Corn still backward. Range excel
lent and stock all fat. Labor situa
lion about normal. ,
Teton—Showers. Températures aie
high making growing com at ions idea .
All gram looking fine , .//^ No cTu
age by hail in some sections. No
Northeastern District
Daniels—All crops making phe
nominal growth. Early wheat .head
in £- Haying started. Labor situa
Non weH balanced. „
-Phiilrps — Warm wjathet exec ^
growing conditions !0i al demand
/f/. y / ram nml clover ready
1 /ttinJ* a
, excellent grow
■ ta |^Ä: No a>r■rtÄ" «p.
Ranges good. Crop conditions vary
| good,
Small
fallow and
Corn, beans,
splendid
Blaine—Dry, hot
grains put on summer
corn ground very good,
potatoes and beets making
progress with warmer weather, rros
pocts for more hogs bein ^^'^p
West Central District
Ravalli—Recent rains have im
proved general crop conditions con
siderably. Pastures improved some
what. Labor supply and demand
equal!
Central District
Precipitation .04 inches.
Winter wheat be
Livestock in good
Cascade
Haying started.
gmmnff to ripen.
condition.
! weat^on a°ll crops/
heading with heavy stand. Wool clip
heaviest in years. Ample labor,
\
growing
Winter wheat
Lewis & Clark—Fin 2 cc.rn growing
; weather. Winter wheat will bo short
due to dry weather. Corn not of the
I best. Sufficient labor. Grasshoppers
not s:rious,
East Central District
Pi alrie—Ideal g owing weather.
Crop conditions best in past ten years
doiiffine me hSJTSc. «S 3 l£ Ä
com and sugar beets to grow very
rapidly. Small grams excellent. Live
stock looking good.
Southwestern District
Madison—Heavy showers on
heavy precipitation for almos'
a> ' South Central District
Gallatin Hot weather with local
erg Soaking rains needed. Crop
' eds fair in dryland, fair to good
j n irrigated. Wool clip heacy. La
bar supply adequate but will need
more men for haying an P -
mng season Som-what
Stillwater—Hot wealn . • - not
dry k in tew mean 1 * raD .
suffering' as ye '• : k,it sW ing
idgrom Z excellent!
Inme damage by hoppers. Livestock
Some.^age by ^opp
Yellowstone—Hot weather advanc
e( j backward crops but unfavorable
to dry j a nd grains. Web worm under
con trol. Good alfalfa crop. Spring
grain heading.
Carbon— Growing condition ideal,
4th—
first
Professional
Directory
\
S. E. Paul
Attorney-At-Law
Practice In All Courts
United States
Commissioner
Plentywood, Mont.
For Anything the Family
Wears, Wait for
»!»
I
A. T Larsen
Salesman
I
I
OLE'S DRAY
?
♦14
♦14
TEAM AND TRACK HAULING
Phone 133
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J. G. DEB1NG
Abstracter *
* PLENTYWOOD ABSTRACT CO. 4
Office In Vollum Building. *
* Plentywood
*
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1
Montana. *
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ONSTAD & GREER
LAWYERS
Plentywood, Montana
♦r.
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£
V*.
HOWARD M. LEWIS
LAWYER
HELLAND-STRAND
Undertaking Supplies, Embalming
and Hearse.
Plentywoôd, Mont.
«
*
*
Johnson THE Abstractman *
4 SHERIDAN COUNTY AB- •
* STRACT COMPANY •
* Only The Best Abstracts Of Title *
Plentywood, Montana
* * * * * # *
*
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«

A. C. ERICKSON
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Practice In All Courts
Plentywood, Montana
FUNERAL IRECTOR
LICENSE EM BALM ER
W. L. BRUCE
Prompt attention given U
city and out of town calls.
Lady Assistant. Herse
Residence Phone 166
Plentywood, Mont.
THE WHITE BARBER SHOP
For Better Service
Hair Cuts 60c
Shaves 26c
All other work at Proportionately
low prices.
Ladies* Massage
Baths
Shampoo
Hair Singe
LOUIS MOE, Prop.
Make Your Headquarters
LELAND HOTEL
WHEN IN PLENTYWOO D
MODERN CONVENIENCES
with exception of few spots crop con
aitions fine over entire county. Corn
growing rapidly. Wheat heading. La
bor situation adequate. Some grass- of
hoppers appearing here and there.
Fallon—No rain. Excellent grow
ing conditions. Corn coming fine,
Winter grain theading out in excellent
shape. Will be demand for labor for
haying and harvest about July 28th.
Rosebud—Rainfall light. All crops
looking good. Spring wheat in the
boot. Com and oats making good
growth. Livestock in good shape,
Beans and beets doing well.
Westby, Mont., July 11.—It is now j
a fact that Westby will have a four 1
FOUR YEAR HIGH
SCHOOL FOR WESTBY
►HHu
What Is a Table Richly Spread
Without a Loaf of
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Mothers Bread
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BUY YOUR
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FLEISHMANS YEAST i
--» .at the™-——.
Plentywood Bakery j
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Canning season is now on and every
woman is busy preserving to have a supply of
CANNED" preserves for winter.
To make this hot task these warm days a
I
u
pleasure as well as a duty, use "THE LARGE
PRESERVING KETTLES
MONS KEROSENE STOVE.
and a "S1M
r>

E. C. Heiland
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The House of Honest Values
ii
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*<■> :« fr* 1 ) 1 ! 1 ♦ 4> ♦ ♦ » ♦ * ♦ " Î 1 ^
The Best Food Served As You Like It
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Bring your family here for their
meals. It is more economical, and
so much less work than trying t°
do your own cooking.
CITY CAFE
HARRY KOIKE, Prop.
the Producers News
$3.00 A Year
year accredited high school tr
This will make th e school
our city second to none in n,-* 1 * 8 '
the state. At first it « te r
tnac it would be impossible t c U Kht
it, but a way cut V /& s
will make it unnecessary tiT? ' vhiî *>
extra tax. - v 10 n av e an
The school board met last t
evening at the Farmers Ues <lay
considered several bids for n m
largement of the school hou J *
car e of the extra class of Wk Î**
pupils and which will gi V p Sch ° d
deal of much needed room î ****
lower grades. m * or the
The bid of C. A. Briber? w v A >•
eighteen miles southwest of thi 1VV
was accepted by the board „
other bidders, as it was tho u 6r tw °
several thousand dollars/ ' esl fy
Mr. Friberg has already
the work on the school house
pects to have it completed
middle of August.
Kxa
en
' >
place
started
and ex.
by the

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