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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, March 20, 1925, Image 1

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HISTORICAL SOCIETY
OF MONTANA,
HELENA.
T
liberty
IS NOT
handed down
FROM ABOVE
THE PRODUCERS
NEWS GOES INTO
EVERY HOME IN
THE COUNTY.
\
A PAPER OF THE PEOPLE. FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE
PLENTYWOOD, SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1925
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF SHERIDAN COUNTY
Official Paper of the City of Plentywood
VOL. VII. No. 30
Continuing the Outlook Promote
Sheridan County News & Dooley Su*
4L
%
m
ay
* :
Northeastern Federal Farm Loan Associations Met At Glasgow Mont
ALLTEAMSARE KEYED IIP TO HIGH PITCH
First Game to Be Played Today (Friday) At the Farmer-Labor
Temple at 2:30 O'clock—Lots Will Be Drawn to De
termine Who Will Play Winner.
BIG DANCE AFTER LAST GAME SAT. NIGHT
One of the Famous Dances at the Farmer-Labor Hall Will Be
Held Immediately After the Last Game Saturday Night,
March 21st—Many Out-of-Town Guests Will Take Ad
vantage of This Occasion to Dance in the Finest Hall in
Northeastern Montana. .
The Basket-ball Tournament to be
played at the Farmer-Labor Temple,
commencing this afternoon at 2:30
promises o be one of the biggest
events in basket ball history in this
ction of Montana. The contending
teams ar e all set for the fray which
ill determine who are the champions
of Sheridan County.
TEAMS ARRIVE
THIS MORNING
The teams will arrive from the
-outh this (Friday) forenoon and the)
Outlook team will drive over from |
Outlook in time to be ready for the I
first big game at 2:30 o'clock,
media ely upon arriving the teams
will draw lots to determine who shall
play first and then lots will be drawn
' ■ tween the balance of the teams to
determine who shall play the winner.
In tha way the elimination process
v ill be applied until the final game on i
Saturday night.
GIRLS' TEAMS
WILL PLAY
The girl?' teams from Outlook and
Medicine Lake will play for the cham
j-uiiship either on Friday or Satur
ay. This will attract considerable
t ention as both teams are very well
trained and a good game is anticipat
GAMES WILL START AT
2:30 AND 8:00
In order to allow sufficient time for
fh. winning team to rest between the
, the afternoon games will start
promptly at 2:30 and will then be
r by 4. This will give the winning
team four hours in which to rest up
(Continued on last page)
Im
ovc
of
BILL GARNER FIGHTS
WILLIAMS TO DRAW
j
!
Raymond Boxer Makes Wonderful Showing Against Heavier
Opponent Who Has Had Many Years' Ring Experience
Decision Was Popular and Both Fighters Earn Respect
of Spectators.
LOCAL BOY SHOWS CHAMPIONSHIP CALIBRE
t Tuesday night, fighting before
a-sized audience at the Farmer
■ Temple, "Bill" Garner of
u nd and Jack Williams of Great
were awarded a draw in a 10
nd bout.
1 s:l5, Garner and Williams 100 k
; spective corners with Jack
it as referee and Leo Zeidler
first round began to wear on
I ectutors were pleasantly sur
at the manner in which .he
boy was conducting ihimself and
punch for punch and keep
ovt red in good shape.
Ilia ns is a particularly vicious
with an uppercut that will 1
the k. o. if it ever lands and
. .I this repeatedly. He shows
years of experience in ring gen
eralship and when pressed hard had
i n pregnable defense. That he
1 hard man to beat by any rtian of
! weight was plainly shown to the
t fans and they were unanimous ;
:, i proclaiming him a wonderful fight
apping
er
er.
"Hill", of course, was the favorite
of the crowd around the ring side. I
He was lustily cheered every time he
made a particularly brilliant attack.
The cheering was no doubt caused in
a large measure by the relief of the
backers of the local lad, who before
the fight did not think that Gamer
(Continued on last page)
WESTBY WINS FROM
WHTTETAIL TEAM
Westby, March 13.—Last Friday
evening the fast Whitetail basketball
team was taken into camp by the lo
cal boys to the tune of 23 to 17 at
i
the A. O. U. W. hall. The game was
a fast one from start to finish and
was without a doubt the best game
of the season.
The Whitetail boys book the lead
by hard and fast work in the first
half by 8 to 2, but the Westby boys
lived up to their reputation of doing
their best and fastest w r ork in the
last half and for a few minutes took
the opposition off their feet by mak- i
ing five baskets in about two minutes. !
Both teams played fast and showed i
wonderful team work to the very last.
*
* FAMOUS LIBERAL CHINESE *
* LEADER FINALLY DIES
*
*
Peking, March 12.—Dr. Sun
* Yat Sen, South China leader, *
* died this, Thursday morning. *
* Surgeons who opera ed January *
* 26th, gave him ten days to live
* but the aged Chinaman clung to *
* life.

* Time and again the story of *
* Dr. Sun Yat Sen's death has an- *
* peared in the daily papers only *
* to be refuted later, but the last *
* report is authentic and the Chin-' *
* ese republic has lost a great *
* benefactor.
*
:
I
i
Ê nn ft WTVÏ ATtF 1
Al Ail I Ml Sr Y.
n - uuwl
POULTRY SHOW
The first annual Sheridan County 1
Poultry Show' held at Antelope Tues- 1
day, March 17th, was a big success in i
spite of the fact that the roads were
impassable for cars. This made it
impossible to get in entries from dis- i
tant points in the county.
R. L. Waddell, State College, judg
ed the exhibits and he stated that the:
entries were exceptionally good. Mr.
1 Waddell also gave a talk on livestock. 1
County Agent Ostby gave a poul- j
try culling demonstration,
About 250 people viewed the exhi
WINNERS
Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds
1. Cock—Richard Grayson.
; 1. Old hen—Richard Grayson.
2. Old Hen—Richard Grayson.
1. Old hen—Richard Grayson.
Cockerel— Alf Hoven.
Cockerel—Bernard Bessire.
1. Pullet— Alf Hoven.
2. Pullet— Alf Hoven.
1. Young Pen— Alf Hoven.
Single Comb Rhode Island Reds
1st. Pullet—Bessire.
Barred Plymouth Rocks
(Continued on last page)
bits.
1.
I 2.
New Evidence looms Up In
Death of Young Millionaire
Principals In Millionaire Orphan Death Quiz
l!
I
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Above are Mr. and Mrs. W D. |
Shepherd of Chicago, foster par
ents of Wm. McClintock, the youth- i
ful heir to $6,000,000 who died from
typhoid fever while his fiancee,
Miss Isabelle Pope (below), waited '
outside the door with a marriage
license The will left all to the
Shepherds, except $8,000 a year to '
Miss Pope So much talk followed -
that the authorities stepped In to ■
leam if there were any ulterior I
causes of death.
EJ 1
John Bauer, Held at Culberson, Claim He Fired Six-Shooter
. • Hitrina of I Î 7 ntip Was Accidental _
to Ubserve Custom, rutting or Lizotte was ACCiaeniai
Victim Tells Different Story.
CULBERTSON BOY IS WOUNDED IN
SHOOTING SCRAPE; ASSAILANT IN JAIL
'
+ _
Culbertson, March 14.—A custom
prac
firing a gun on birthdays,
ticed by many of mixed Indian and
white blood, is alleged to have result
ed here Saturday in a shooting scrape
which Mike Lizotte, 19, a member
of Company E, National Guard, was
shot Through the left leg by John
Bauer, 43, at the former's home at
noon.
The principals disagree on
manner of the shooting. The father
of the victim claims that Bauer was
drunk, while Bauer states that he
was following out the custom among
Indians of firing a gun in celebration
of the birthday of the Lizotte boy.
Bauer is lodged in the Culbertson
jail charged with first degree assault
on complaint of Lizotte's father.
Bauer has served seven and a half
years at Deer Lodge, the result of a
stabbing affair at the Stevens saloon
here, nine years ago, and was releas
ed a year and a half ago on parole.
In an interview, the wounded boy
said Bauer entered the rear door of
the
the house and inquired for the boy's
father. Upon being informed that
the father was out he backed up
against the wall and pulled cut a six
shooter, firing at the lad, as ho turned
to replenish the fire in the kitchen
('stove. The boy bent over wounded
and Bauer fired a second shot at the 1
(Continued on last page)
STATE BOUNTY
SEASON Dll TO
OPEN APRIL 1ST
Mountain Lions, Wolves and Coyotes
Included In Lists—Sheriffs to Sup
ervise.
The bounty season as created by
the last state legislature will open
April 1, after which, until July 1,
payments wifi be made for the kill
ing of mountain lions, wolves and
coyotes, Sheriff Tom Norton was no
tified Saturday in an official commu
nication from Helena.
Introduced by the senate commit
tee on stock growing and grazing and
fostered by the livestock commission,
the measure is intended to protect
(Continued on last page)
OLD TYME DANCE
SATURDAY, MAR. 28
AMERICAN LEGION BOYS TO
PUT ON ONE OF THE OLD
TIME DANCES tOR WHICH
THEY ARE FAMOUS.
Plentywood will again enjoy one
of the old time dances sponsored by
the American Legion at the Farmer
Labor Temple, Saturday, March 28th.
Old time dances are all the rage
in the cities at the present time and
jazz is giving way to the old-fashion
ed trip of years ago.
Everything will be in harmony with
the old-time dance and the music will |
b e composed of musicians who were
the artists in that day. Besides this .
the Legion boys are planning to have
some surprises for the people who
attend the dance.
Everybody, old and young, are go-:
ing to attend the "Old Tyme" dance |
a. the Farmer-Labor Temple, Satur
day, March 28th and take part in
a most delightful social affair and
which will long be 'remembered
the spacious and excellent floor
11 add to the greater enjoyment «of
one
as
wi
the old time dance than heretofore.
The local pos- of the American Le
gion is making every arrangement
for the comfort and ease of their
guests at this dance and people from
nearby towns and country are invited
to attend this dance and enjoy the
bes floor and most elegant surround
ings of any dance hall in Northeast
Montana and as fine as any in
the State.
The beautiful Rado Set which the
Legion Boys have been selling tickets
the past few days will be raffled
eff on the evening of the big dance
and ho lucky winner will receive his
ern
on
prize. __
STOCK MEN AND MEAT EAT
ERS TAKE A SLANT AT THIS
Chicago, March 18.—The annual
report of Armour & Co., packers,
made public Sunday by F. Edson
White, president, in the form of a
letter to stockholders, shows that
sales for 1924 totaled more than
$800,000,000 and that net profits for
the year were $18,309,738, as against
$13,772,026 for 1923. Surplus at the
end of 1924 amounted to $54,807,000,
as against $45,790,803 at the end of
1923.
State's Attorney Prosecutes
Case After Sheperd Was
Exonerated From Blame for
Death of William Nelson
McClintock Because of the
Lack of Evidence to Con
vict.
Chicago, March 17.—True bills
charging murder were reported to
have been voted last Tuesday in the
grand jury investigation of rich
young William Nelson McClintock's
dea.h last December 4 from typhoid
fever.
Previously Robert E. Crowe, state's
attoxpey, had announced the grand
in session until
jury would be kept in session until
William D. Shepherd, McClintock's
foster father and chief heir of his
estate of approximately $1,0000,000,
and C. C. Faiman, former delivery
wagon driver, but more recently head
of a school of bacteriology, had been
charged formally with responsibility
for the youth's death.
Promised $100,000
Faiman followed up his confession
of the early morning that for a prom
ise of $100,000 from the McClintock
estate lie had provided typhoid fever i
perms and schooled Shepherd in ad- 1
ministering ttiem to ÄlcClhitock by
signing a waiver of immunity and
going before the grand jury.
The dapper little claimant of three
degrees from universities, which de
i nied his pretensions, was before the
(inquisitional body one hour and 45
I minutes.
He was followed by Harry Olson,
! municipal chief justice, who started
(the McClintock investigation shortly
i after the youth died.
1 Dr. George Fosberg, who had re
j ported Shepherd discussed germs and
subtle poisons with him, and J. W.
Marchand, former agent for Faiman's
National University of Sciences, who
told of a letter Shepherd had written
regarding a course in bacteriology,
were yesterday's witnesses. ex
pected the indictments will be re
turned in open court tomorrow morn
ing.
The accused man has not broken
under long hours of_ questioning,
while Mr. Crowe held him admittedly
The gtate authorities Tuesday
p] anne{ j exhumation of the body of
Mrs. Emma Nelson McClintock, whose
death placed the "millionaire orphan
in the hands of the Shepherds and
| John E. Bergum died at the Ameri
can Legion Hospital at Battle Creek,
. Mich., on morning of February 28th,
1925 . His father, Chris Bergum, pre
: ceded him by several months and
both are laid away at Immanuel
Lu\ hieran cemetery,
(Continued on page 8)
JOHN ECHO? BERGUM
John was bom at Wanamingo,
Minn. He was out here on a visit
about three years ago. He served at
peace-time duty in Camp McLellan
and Jackson, and places in South
Carolina ancf Alabama, for a period
0 f three years in the army. He
joined the Naval Coast Guards on
August lOih, 1924 and was stationed
at Hampton Roads, Virginia. Due to
sickness he was obliged to resign
from the service and was on his way
out to Sheridan county to visit his
brother Sigard, but could not make
the trip.
The body was shipped to Grenora,
N. D., and six of the American Le
gion service men of that town were
out and acted as pall bearers at the
funeral service on March 8th.
LUTHERAN AID WILL HOLD
APRON SALE MARCH 27TH
The Lutheran Ladies' Aid will hold
their apron sale on Friday, March
27th, at the church basement. _
lunch will also be served and every
one is cordially invited to attend.
Hot
THE BOY IS RIGHT
Puzzle Fan:
used less than any other commodity.
What is it, in ten letters?"
Wiseguy: "That's easy,
PERIENCE."
It costs more and is
u
It's EX
Vlany Items of Interest to Farmers Who Loaned Money from
Government Taken Up and Discussed—Well Known
Speakers Address Large Number of Delegates.
NEXT CONVENTION TO BE HELD IN THIS CITY
Delegates from Northeastern Montana Boost Plentywood for
Next Convention and Win Their Point—A Big Boost for
Sheridan County Metropolis.
FROH) CITIZEN DIES
AT FARGO SUDDENLY
Froid, Mont., March 13.—Friends
here are indeed sorry to learn of the
death of Ed. Be'auchamp of this place
which occurred at Fargo, N. W., Wed
nesday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock. Mr.
Beauchamp went to Fargo a week or
so ago to have some ulcerated teeth
treated and it appears '.hat blood poi
son developed and caused his death,
Wednesday morning the family here
and his mother received word to come
to Fargo at once as Mr, Beauchamp
was very low. They left the same
day but arrived too late to see him
before death. What • arrangemen s
have been made in regard to burial
are not known at this writing but it
is believed that it will be in Fargo
where he has relatives living, ami
we understand, some buried there,
Mr. Beauchamp was one of the
early pioneers of Froid, and has many
i friends here who extend o the bo
1 reaved family their heartfelt sympa
thy in the loss of a husband and 1
father. __
* * * * « ' * » »
* MONTANA WEATHER ^
* WILL BE RADIOED
* IF PLANS PREVAIL
* , - .
* Broadcasting of daily weather *
* forecasts by radio will soon be a *
* realiiy if plans now under way •
* by the Montana weather bureau ;
* offices at Helena materialize -
* whereby the KUOM radio sta- *
* tion of the. State university at
* Missoula will be given the fore- -
* casts. Th e university s ation is _
* the only one strong enough in *
* the state to carry the forecasts *
* to every corner of the state, it
* is said,
* * *
WARREN LOSES OUT
Coolidge Fails to Receive Confirmation of Sugar Trust At
torney's Appointment for the Attorney Generalship of
the U. S. By Senate.
JOHN G. SARGENT OF VERMONT IS NAMED
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CHARLES B. WARREN
NOTICE
All members of the Plentywood
Commercial Club are respectfully re
quested to pay their dues for the en
suing year to
G. A. SIMMONS, Secretary.
The convention of the Northeastern
Montana Federal Farm Loan Associ
ations held at Glasgow an March
17th was very well attended, every
association sending delegates but two.
The Northeastern Montana district
consists of Blaine, Phillips, Valley,
Roosevelt, Richland, McCone, Sheri
dan and Daniels counties.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
WELL REPRESENTED
Delegates from every one of the
Federal Farm Loan Associations
Sheridan County attended the conven
in
tion. The Outlook Federal
Loan Assn, sent Nels M. Olson and
John Stoner as delegates, the Comer
town Association sent Alfred Hjelm
and Henry Skeels. We have not the
of all of the delegates who
represented the Dagmar and Antelope
Associations, but Jack Courtney at
tended the convention as one of the
delegates from Antelope and Niels
Christensen, secretary of the Dag
Federal Farm Loan Association
represented that organization.
SUER. CO. DELEGATES
1 LAND BIG CONVENTION
The delegates from Sheridan Coun
ty suggested that the next convention
b e held at • Plenty wood which propo
sition was voted upon and accepted
with little opposition. This will be
another boost for Sheridan County, it
being the most northeasterly county
0 f the group embraced in the district
an( j was generally believed that
the delegates from the southwestern
counties would object to coming to
this coun ty for the purpose of atiend
i ng a Federal Farm Loan Assn,
Convention.
tation for being a
spread over the
Montana, and most people when the
* opportunity offers are glad to accept
an jnvitaiton to visit Sheridan Coun
names
mar
But Plentywood s repu
live town has
whole State of
(Continued on last page)
Perhaps one of the most bitter po
litical controversies in Congress end
ed March 17th, when Coolidge aban
doned the idea of securing the con
firmation of the sugar trust attorney,.
Charles B. Warren, as attorney
general, after confirmation of his
appointment hod been twice rejected
by the Senate.
John G. Sargent is a former state
at omey-general of Vermont and it
is reported that he is quite satisfac
tory to the New England mill own
ers and manufacturers. The Senate
confirmed his appointment in leas,
than one hour af .er it had been sub
mitted to them by Coolidge, which
would indicate that no time was giv
en to consider the qualification of the
Coolidge appointee.
The RepuW rn administration
which was suppô t ! to be function
ing splendidly leceived a severe jolt
in the late controversy, as it is very
unusual to reject the nomination of
a presidential appointee. Coolidge
and .his advisers term i.he Warren
controversy as a political conspiracy
against the administration, stating
that the Democrats were determined
10 wage a n relentless war upon the
appointment of Warren for political
reasons only. Sen. Walsh of Mon
tana took a leading part in fighting
the administration on the ground
that Warren was a sugar trust at
torney and he produced a large
(Continued on Page Eight)

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