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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 15, 1925, Image 2

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AMERICA'S GREATEST BLUFFER
STARTS SERVING TERM IN
PRISON AT LEAVENWORTH
OIL FIELDS THE FINAL
CLAIMED FIRST SCALING
AND THEN DISCOVERY
Leavenworth, Kas., May 12.—Dr.
turned to the practice of medicine.
nevertheless for the next 12 to 14
medicine will be his profession. His
istering to the ills of his fellow
here. He is No, 23,118.
So opens one of the late chapters
greatest bluffer. Should he live to
years, he will be 72 years old when
shine of freedom. lie was bom in
10, 1865.
"Doc" Cook, the man who has bluf
fed in a big way all through life,
has never vet put one of them across.
But he is still trying. Only last week
in Fort Worth. Tex., he attempted a
bold and grand bluff—of how he had
refused to join a jail delivery. This
was just befoi-e his transfer to the
government prison here. W ardens
Bididle and Zerbst of this institution
will perhaps have many such bluffs
and brainstorms of the famous doc
tor to deal with before he says good
bye.
in
a
er
If the reader is of the younger gen
eration, perhaps they are not fami
liar with the doings of Doc Cook.
Here are some of his bluffs—one of
which he cashed in on—but was
caught.
Doc Cook claimed to have been the
first man to scale Mt. McKinley. He
was given a seat in the hall of fame
besides such explorers as Agassiz
and Herschel. Later his claim was
disapproved. This was in 1906.
CLAIMED HE HAD
REACHED NORTH POLE
In 1909 he returned from the
North, less than two weeks ahead of
Admiral Perry, the real discoverer,
claiming that he had reached the
North Pole. He returned by way of
Denmark—which country officially
honored him. New York gave him
the "freedom of the city" and hung
garland of roses about his neck. Per
ry's sudden return with authentic
data and proofs of he himself hav
ing reached the pole was the bomb I
which epploded all of Doc Cook's
' claims—and the praise and honor he
so gloried in was quickly turned to
ridicule and scorn.
+w ie n na f ti0n r S ° g 7 at
that Doctoi Cook left the countr\,
going to Borneo. There is no record
of his bluffs on the wild folks of the
East Indies, but that there were
some, there is no doubt.
XT , , „
No sooner had the famous' ex-[
plorer returned to the United States, î
than he was busy again "stringing" j
suckers. His ideas were along new;
avenues, however, for, whereas he i
always had specialized on scientists,
royalty and a trusting general pub- !
lic, he now turned his attention to !
widows, orphans and poor folks who
wanted to get rich quick by the oil
well route—and he strung them to the
tune of some $4,000,000.
It would seem that his idea of a
going concern was to consolidate
some 30o bankrupt oil companies with
dry wells and make them into one big
solvent company with flowing wells.
He "sold" the idea of the big com
pany so well to the inexperienced and
ignorant, that he was rolling in mil
lions when the government stepped
HIS OIL IDEAS
BROUGHT $4,000,000
*>
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t
COMING
it
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v
To Antelope
Monday, May 18 th
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Skarning & Company
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Skaming's world-wide popularity, and some of
the leading newspapers' recommendation
sure you that Mr. Skarning, as well as Mrs.
Anna Skarning and others of this
are real artists.
Skarning received his new accordion March 15,
1925, which is special made by the Italian
American Accordion Co. in Chicago, and by
them said to be the finest and most expensive
Instrument ever manufactured.

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company
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Concert
BEGINS AT 8:13 p. m. AND A REAL OLD
NORSK MORRO AFTER THE PROGRAM
ADMISSION
50 cents.
_ •_
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WATERLOO FOR MAN WHO
OF MT. McKINLEY
OF NORTH POLE.
12.—Dr. Frederick A. Cook has re
It was against his will, but
years, should his health permit,
services are free. He is min
convicts in the Federal prison
chapters in the career of America's
to serve out his term of 12 to 14
he again steps into the sun
in Sullivan County, N. Y., June
in to investigate.
Comiction was obvious from the
first. He was sentenced to serve 14
years.
To show the workings of Doc
Cook's brain—he sued a Fort Worth
newspaper for libel, claiming $1,000,- ;
000 damages—after he had been con- !
victed.
Doc Cook had rare gifts, had they
been used in the right direction. He
was endowed with a rare personality,
a beaming smile and affability -that
won the confidence of strangers. He
started life well enough—but he nev
er could control the desire to bluff.
Leaving the home place up state in
New York he went to Brooklyn where
he drove a milk wagon until he had
earned enough money to start thru
medical college. _
He was a member of Admiral Per
ry's party on one of the earlier ex
plorations—but had been missing for
some years when he came from the
north with his announcement of hav
ing reached the pole. Even after all
of his claims were disapproved he
maintained his stand and even went
forth on the lecture platform to car
ry out his bluff. However, his pic
tures were old, his dairies falsified
and in no way had he data which
would stand inspection.
I
SIMSON CHALLENGES
i w r n\ at \t \t » m/^n
ALLEY TO MAT MATCH
a good
He made the gum-drop candy fam
ous—by claiming that by feeding the
Eskimos these colorful sweets, they
braved the intense cold and lead him
to the pole.
If in the prison library here there
is a Who's Who, Doc Cook will likely
gleam a bit of satisfaction, because
there amongst the great is his name.
Great Falls, Montana, May 11th.—
A challenge to Tom Alley of northern
!ther n Montana, state 1 ight-heavy
weight wrestling champion, was re
î ceived by The Tribune Sunday from
j Earl Simpson of Grand Forks; N. D.
Simpson declares that he is willing to
i meet Alley any place he wishes and
under any terms. He states in his
! challenge that he will post a $100 for
! feit for his appearance and as a guar
antee that he will make 180 pounds
ringside the day of the match.
The Tribune is in error when it
states that Alley is light-heavy
weight champion of this state, as Él
wood House carries that honor by
reason of winning from Alley last
a ; winter, but Alley is a good man and
the two men should make
i match,
I
IN DARKEST ARFICA
1 Products of General Motors have
reached into darkest Africa, where
railroad stations are lighted by Del
co-Light.
Doc Cook
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! 25.116
\ ^yfA-TOcAtrc^l CJ
"In Ms prison cell he sits—may
be thinking of his beloved North
Pole — his greatest hoax on the
world. It was "oil" this time and
it landed Dr. Frederick A. Cook in
the U. S. Prison at Leavenworth,
Kansas. ' .
PUBLISHER OF
MONTANA BANKER
HAS HECK OF A TIME
A. B. Casteel Gets Married, Is Put In
Jail and Loses Bride In Course of a
Few Hours—Files Kidnapping
Charge Against Bride's Parents. ...
The marital ship of A. B. Casteel,
who is publisher of the Montana
Banker, a publication gotten out by
the bankers of the State of Montana,
threatened to go on the rocks
at Choteau several days ago when he
was detained there in the county jail
for several hour? at the request of the
mother of his 16-year-old bride, is on
the verge of foundering in a sea of
trouble, it was indicated a few days
ago in a complaint filed by the bride
groom in the Wilson justice court
agains his parents-in-law.
The bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
L. D. Cawley are accused of kidnap
ping by their son-in-law and Mr. Caw
ley was placed under arrest a few
days ago. He later was released on
his own recognizance to appear in
court April 27. The father-in-law en
tered a plea of not guilty and re
fused to discuss the alleged kidnap
ping, except to say to officers that he
could not disclose the hiding place of
his wife and their daughter.
Search was being made Saturday
night for the bride and her mother,
but all efforts to locate them had up
to a late hour failed. The kidnap
ping, according to Casteel's story to
the sheriff's office tock place shortly
after the bridegroom's release from
jail at Choteau Thursday night on
order issued by Co. Atty. Coffey of
k *
"A
!
There is no reason why a
De Laval separator shouldn't
give 100% service
i
!
W
E have frequently advertised our Author
ized De Laval Service. We have told you
that we shall be glad to take care of your
De Laval, so bring it in to us. We have a specially
trained man to do this work. There is no reason
why every De Laval Separator in this territory
shouldn't give the 100% service and long years
of use of which every De Laval is capable.
If you haven't brought in your De Laval, don't
put it off any longer.
Heliand
Hardware
HEATROLAS
FURNACES
Firearms, Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, Tools, Paints,
Oils, Harness, Furniture, Undertaking
PLENTYWOOD, MONTANA
DE LAVAL
SEPARATORS

*
Teton county. Coffey held that as the
girl was more than 16 years of age,
the marriage, performed a few hours
earlier, was legal.
The persistent mother, who had
motored to Ghoteau to recover her
daughter, Casteel says, refused to be
reconciled by the county attorney's
edict and by means unknown to her ,
son-in-law took her away in the night. 1
The sheriff's office a few days ago |
were continuing the search with their
efforts especially directed towards
Lewistown, where Mrs. Cawley is be
lieved to be at the home of a sister
with her daughter.
Mr. Casteel insists that his bride is
over 18. Records in the office of
County Superintendent of Schools
Clara Christison show the girl was
born October 20, 1908.
At this writing it has not been
learned as to the outcome of the
marital troubles of the publisher of
the Montana Banker.
4* ♦ 4' 'Î 1 « S » ♦ ♦ » I * > f i
&
REAL ESTATE II
TRANSFERS |
* » : ■ * ■:< » : < * . h ^H"******** 4
DEEDS
W. H. Irvine to J. C. Beck, $400.00,
lots 3, 3, of 31-33-58.
N. J. Nelson, mayor, to T. H. A.
Ross, lot 25, in sec. 4, Outlook ceme
tery.
Mrs. T. J. Gunderson to French
Farming Co., $1.00, lot 10, blk. 1,
orig. Med. Lake.
U. S. A. to Engebret Torstenson,
patent, lot 4, SW 1-4 NW 1-4, W 1-2
SW 1-4, 2, SE 1-4 SE 1-4, 3, NW 1-4
NW 1-4, 11 and N 1-2 NE 1-4, 10
36-54.
U. S. to Katie Hendrickson, pat
ent, lot 4, SW 1-4 NW 1-4, W 1-2 SW
1-4, 2, E 1-2 NE 1-4, 10. W 1-2 NW
1-4, 11-35-51.
J.ohanna Kelley et vir to S. H. Far
rington, see record.
Ed. Weiss et ux to Jensina Mad
sen, $1600.00, lot 5, block 5, orig,
Plentywood. $1600.
Bessie O. Lipscomb to Anna V.
Riohwine, $4200.00, S 1-2 SE 1-4, NW
1-4, 16-32-57.
IN THE SULTAN'S PALACE
The palace of the Sultan of Selang
or, on the Malay Peninsula, secures
its modern electric illumination thru
the use of a Delco-Light electric pow
er plant, a General Motors product.
I
j (*>£■
"Hello Daddy-don't
forget my WHgteys"
Slip a package
your pocket mu
you bo home lO
Tll^ht.
Give the youngsters
this wholesome, lon^
lasting sweet - for
pieasare^d benefit
tn
en
m
Vse il yrarsrif after
.smoking or when
work drags. Its a .
«JreaHtttle freshener f
i
WRKL
'ytereOerytneaTi
5(9
Fît
IPI/ fAITDT TA
ASK LUUK1 ill
0011 WUIU 1V
TMA DETEIVCDCUID
HilLI ItJjvLil f Ltl\iJilll
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AC CADjllUPw D AMIf
Ul 1 fililULilVü DrillIV
_
Havre, Mont.—The district court is
asked to immediately order O. G. |
Skystead, receiver of the Farmers
State bank to sell the assets of that
institution and close up the receiver- 1
ship, in a petition filed by the Fideli
> and Deposit company of Mary
land and the Maryland Casualty com- ,
Pany Baltimore, two of the bank's 1
! creditors.
- Hearing on the petition has been !
\- et for May 13.
In the petition it is alleged that ac-1
i cording to a report of the state exam- j
i bier assets of the bank are worth
I approximately §25,772.38 of which
! s um about $12,000 is in cash. j
It is claimed that the cast of ad
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Baking
ixPowderi
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ft
tow
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tf(0
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faff?:
Ob
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F.O. B, DAYTON. O,
- •;
T HERE is a new Delco-Light—a
Delco-Light that places electricity
within the reach of every farm in
America. It is lower in price than any
Delco-Light Plant has ever been. And
it can be bought on terms so easy that
no farm family need wait any longer to
give its home the wonderful benefits of
electric light.
All that electric light means in com
fort, convenience, safety and economy is
now available to the million farm homes
that have always wanted electricity, but
have felt that its cost was too great.
Completely Installed at a
Small Extra Cost
In addition to this, special arrange
ments have been made whereby the
Delco-Light Dealer in your community
will install your plant and wire your
house for five lights to be located wher
ever you specify. You will receive with
the plant five beautiful spun-brass light
ing fixtures complete.with bulbs.
And all of this—plant, installation,
wiring, fixtures, everything ready to turn
on the lights—will cost you only $53, in
addition to the price of the plant itself.
A Small Down Payment
Balance on Easy Terms
An Amazingly Low
Price
Finally, we have arranged that this
new low cost for Delco-Light, completely
installed, can be paid on terms so easy
that anyone can take advantage of them.
The total cost is only $248, including
freight (a little more west of the Missis
sippi). But you make only a small
down payment. The balance is payable
on easy terms, arranged to suit your
convenience.
For months we have been working on
the development of this new Delco-Light.
Our years of experience as the world's
• largest manufacturers of farm electric
plants have enabled us to design a plant
that will give dependable electric light
to any home. And our enormous manu
facturing facilities enable us to build this
plant at the lowest possible cost, and to
sell it at a price that makes Delco-Light
a real econoniy.
A Non-Storage Battery
Plant—600 Watt
Capacity
The new plant is a genuine Delco
Light in every respect—full 600-watt
capacity, strong, sturdily built, economi
cal in operation. It is equipped with a
standard Delco starter and an economical
starting battery. And its price is only
$195 f. o. b. Dayton — the lowest price
and the greatest value ever offered in a
Delco-Light electric plant.
Ask tor Details
Never before has such an offer been
made. Never before has Delco-Light
cost so little and been so easy to buy. It
means that any farm home—your home
can have Delco-Light today.
At the bottom of this advertisement
appear the name and address of the
Delco-Light Dealer for your community.
Lall, write, or telephone for full in
formation—specifications of the plant,
illustrations of the fixtures that come
with it, details of our complete installa
tion and wiring plan, and the figures
Delco-Light° W eaS1 ^ y° u can now get
Delco-Light Company, Dayton,
Ohio, Subsidiary of Qeneral Motors

1-,
SIMON SWANSON, Dealer
PLENTYWOOD
MONTANA
D ELCO LIGHT CO., Fargo S ales Branch, 19 Broadway, FARGO, NORTH DAK.
ministering the receivership as sjj° mi
bv reports filed since February 6,
1923, to April 1, 1925, was over .1.
er cent of the money collectetL I
-
EX-KANSAS GOVERNOR
FACES CHARGE TODAY
-- .
Topeka Kan., May 10.—Selection oi
jury' to try Jonathan M. Davis, for
™er governor, on a charge of sohcit
big a bribe for a pardon tor ., -
Grundy, convicted bank president ox j
Hutchinson, Kan., will Degin nere :
Monday morrting in distnc
Defense and prosecuting a *- ^
agreed Sunday night that testing ot
prospective jurors will require ;a d
or two. Although ^
- Peterson, former Hank commission
Ä'Ä
son w iU. not be tried until later.
_ - -
THERE ARE MANY SUCH
gjn Shiftless-_"I »never pay any
attention to knockers.'*
Keen Friend:—"I know that's true
Bill—Not even opportunity.
court. :
»
MKh. ^£^«^£¥£158?
Oh MRS. HARDING, DEAD
-
Washington, May 9.—Mrs. Caroline
Kling, stepmother of the late Mrs.
Florence Kling Harding, died sudden
ly t odaj( 0 n the tram e n route from
Florida to her home at Columbus,
Ohio.
FARMERS ELEVA
TOR COMPANY
OF OUTLOOK
OUTLOOK, MONT.
To the Stockholders in the
above Company:
Please take notice that any
grain that you may have in
store in our elevator at the
and not sold, will not be
sidered in the Patronage Divi
dend for the past year and will
therefore become Next Year's
Business,
con
Our Annual Cutoff will
take place on or about May
20th, 1925.
FARMERS ELEVATOR COM
PANY OF OUTLOOK
T. J. Larson, Mgr.

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