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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 22, 1925, Image 1

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A** 4
Historical SOCIETY
OF MONTANA,
Helena,
rt
^ v>
\VC*
AC^
,V> V
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
LIBERTY
IS NOT
HANDED DOWN
from above
THE PRODUCERS
NEWS GOES INTO
EVERY HOME IN
THE COUNTY.
Published Weekly
A PAPER OF THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEO PLE
Plenty wood, Montana, Friday, May 22, 1925
Official Newspaper of Sheridan County
Entered as Second Class Matter, October 18, 1912, at the Postoffice at
Plentywood, Montana, Under the Act of March 3, 1870 Pub. Weekly
VOL. Viil, No. 7
Sub. Rates: $3.0o per
. Foreign $3.75
year
per year
FOUL MURDER COMMITTED AT SCOBEY
BODY OF VICTIM
FOUND BY TEACHER
Corpse of Carl Siegert Found Floating in Poplar Creek With
Bullet Hole in Head, Where He Was Thought to Have
Been Committed in Place Currently Rumored to Be
torious Gambling Den.
CORONERS JURY BRINGS IN
VERDICT OF MURDER
Sheriff and County Attorney Reported to Be Very Lax in
Running Matter Down, As Murder Is Presumed to Have
Been Committed in Place Curremently Rumored to Be
Operating Under a Permit of County Officials.
Murder and .robbery stalks the
streets of Scobey and casts a shadow
over Daniels county.
The dead body of Carl Siegert,
with a bullet hole through his fore
head, was found floating in Poplar
eek, 20 feet below the bridge be
tween Scobey and the old townsite,
last week,
and
furore of excitement over this climax i
of a long period of lawlessness in the |
count seat of Daniels county. Whenj*
the body was first noticed by Miss
Craddock and Mrs. Johnson, two
Scobey school teachers, it was float
ing in the river. They reported the
find to the Chief of Police and the
Sheriff who brought the body to the
shore. The bedy was fully dressed
and a cup was pulled down over the
ears and face covering the bullet
hole in the right temple that was the
cause of his death.
The people ci the town
surrounding country are in
a
ROBBERY MOTIVE,
IS BELIEF
Siegert disappeared
streets of Scobey about three weeks
ago. About the same time rumors
were current in the town that a row
took place in a notorious gambling
den in which a strange man was said
to have lost considerable money and
then got it back at the point of a
gun.
from the
When Siegert was found his poc
kets were stated to be turned inside
out. The common belief is that rob
bery was a predisposing cause of the
murder.
Siegert arrived in Scobey last Oc
tober and was making plans to start
a pop factory in the city.
Coming from Long Prairie, Minn.,
he seemed to be in comfortable cir
cumstances and to always have money
in his pocket. Whether he was in
veigled into the mad whirl of the
lawless life of the Scobey under
world and lost his roll before or af
ter he was murdered are moot points
on the streets of Scobey today.
(Continued on last page)
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS PAY
ROOSEVELT COUNTY BACK TAXES
Sherdan County Pays Roosevelt $8,623 After Conference
Between Representatives of Both Counties—Expert Ac
count Dwyer Checks Up Books and Gives Report of
Amount Due Roosevelt County.
As a result of a conference be
tween the county commissioners
Sheridan and Roosevelt counties
was agreed that Sheridan County pay
Roosevelt County the sum of $8,623,
this amount constituting the share of
delinquent taxes which had been col
lected by Sheridan County since
Roosevelt County was organized.
Under the Montana Statutes some
forty per cent of the delinquent taxes
are to be paid by the original county
into the treasury of any newly cre
ated county. Several payments of
delinquent taxes have been made by
Sheridan County but there was a
balance still due Roosevelt county and
to arrive at the accurate amount the
board of commissioners of this coun
ty arranged with John D. Dwyer, an
expert accountant, to make a check
of the hooks in the treasurer's office
at Plentywood. This was done and
Mr. Dwyer made a report at a meet
ing held last week between the board
of Sheridan county and Chairman W.
R. Young and members of the Board
of County Commissioners from
Roosevelt county.
In announcing the settlement Chair
man Young and Weinrich stated that
overy courtesy possible had been ex
tended Mr. Dwyer by the treasurer
of Sheridan County and the board of
commissioners.
of
it
;
j
I
I
,
j
* i
I
* I
* ;
■■■■ ;
* <'.n Saturday evening» May ."0, *
* a Grand Ball will be given by *
* the Farmer-Labor Association at *
* the Farmer-Labor Temple. The *
* proceeds will be for the benefit *
* of the Temple. Th e stage will *
* be finished on the evening cf the *
* ball and the hall will be in un- *
* usually good shape for dancing. *
* The feet of the dancers will keen *
* time to the rythm of the music *
» of White's orchestra. A large *
* trowd is expected from the sur- *
* rounding towns and country. As *
* the ball will be one of the events *
* of the season everybody will be *
* there. / *
* GRAND BALL FOR BENEFIT
qf FARMER-LABOR TEM
* ple WILL DRAW LARGE
* CROWD.
BIG DANCE AT
F. L TEMPLE
SAL MAY 38
*
*
* * *
*
MARTIN NELSON TAKES
OVER HELLAND'S UNDER
TAKING BUSINESS
Martin Nelson, the coroner, took
over the Heliand Undertaking busi
ness last week when Mr. Heiland sold
the hardware store to the Peterson
Company. Mr. Nelson who had been
in charge c.f the Undertaking busi
ness while it was owned by Mr.
Heliand, will continue the same
courteous and efficient policy that
has characterized that business in the
past.
The parlors will remain in the
same location and the only difference
will be in the ownership.
* *
* *
* *
* PRODUCERS NEWS GET
* PRINTING CONTRACT *
*
of *
* At the adjourned session
* the Board of County Commis- *
* sioners, Monday, the Producers *
* News was awarded the printing
* contract for the ensuing iwo *
« years.
* There were only two bids filed, *
* that of the Producers News and
* the Plentywood Herald. There :
* were very little difference be- *
* tween the bids. The Board af- *
* ter due
* the contract to the farmers pa- *
* *
* per.
consideration awarded *
******
*
MRS. EMIL STENMARK
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Mrs. Emil Stenmark entertained a
number of her friends at a party at
her home on the south side Thursday
evening in honor of .her birthday. Re
freshments w T ere served in the way
of ice cream and cake. The guests
were: Mesdames Louis and Ole Moe,
Jens GronvcJd, Dan J. Olson, Lawr
ence Olson, Wm. Newlon, S. T. Klov
stad and Charles E. Taylor. A very
happy evening was spent.
Work on Ophei m G. N. Extension May Start Soon
SENATOR ANDERSON SUES WHEAT GROWERS
WE NOTICE
I
—BY P. J. Wallace—
PERTINENT AND IMPER
TINENT PARAGRAPHS PER
TAINING TO THINGS AND
EVENTS OF GREAT AND
SMALL CONCERN.
THAT'DR. O. M. LANSTRUM,
owner of the Record Herald, and J.
M. Hobbins, vice president of the
Anaconda Copper Company are fra
ternizing very closely recently. The
latest joint enterprise engaged in by
the above-named medicine men of two
political
groups is a sucker suction organiza
tion known as "The Pacific Northwest
Commercial and Industrial Exposition
lion" to be .held in New Y'ork in the
spring of 1920. Doc is chairman and
Jim is a mmeber of the Board of Di
rectors and everything is lovely,
o o o
Back in February some of the
try followers cf the Doc and Joe Dix
on noticed that the lobbyists of Doc
and the Company were working joint
ly for the passage of
Resolution No. 10" which was recog
nized as the "Pacific Northwest In
dustrial Exposition. This came as
a jar To the boys who were fed
the mental pabalum that the Anacon
da Company was dishing out money
to everybody who opposed the elec
tion of the Hon. Joe. The silencing
0 f the attacks cf the Record Herald
0n the Anaconda Company after elec
tion made many honest supporters of
Gov, Dixon realize in a dazed sort of
\ Va y that the whole thing was a well
staged game of hokum intended to
bolt the electors into voting for Gov.
Dixon who was elected with the aid
0 f Anaconda money four years be
fore.
supposedly antagonistic
coun
"Senate Joint
on
__
1HE BIG MUDDY KU KLUX
KLAN, which issued a notice threat
ening to usurp the functions of the
civil authorities recently if their con
ception of "decency" and "good mor
als ' were offended should read the,
story of the Grand Dragon Stephen
son in the Producers News this week,
ims gentleman is being prosecuted
for murder, rape, "indcency" and on
the ground that he is a moron. This
sots a rather toublesome precedent,
Several thousands of one hundred
per centers passed through the Klan
klavern at one time or another since
the crafty Bill Simmons conceived the
idea of roping in the gentlemen^with
ten dollar bills and no gray matter.
Every one of these per centers in
cluding the "Big Muddy Knights of
. e are object, to prosecu
tion, if being a moron is illegal.
At a meeting in Indiana, where
Grand Dragon Stephenson was the
main attraction, a Klan lecturer gave
a talk, the burden of which was that
the Klan had "cleaned up" a certain
town in New Jersey. He told all
•ahout how the Klan was supposed to
have driven out all the bartenders and
keepers of bawdy houses, made war
Jewish businessmen, organized a
campaign to expel all Irish police
men from the force and boycott the
Italian barber, the Swedish
and the Greek restuarant
masseuer
man. Since
then practically every well known
Klan leader has been indicted for ev-1
ery crime in the calendar from shoot
ing craps to manslaughter. This in
eludes raps, seduction and sodomy.
In spite of this some local Kluxers
are still foolish enough to. engage in
a cross, burning stunt outside the
house of some local poor woman. As
long as there are morons running
around loose, there will be smart
businessmen to hand them a pillow
case into which their heads can be
jammed while the business of going
through their jeans is attended to.
-
SENATOR T. J. WAI SH in thp
course of an interview published in
a Butte paper stated that he contem
plated a visit to Europe at an early
date. He informs the public that he
will pay a prolonged visit to the world
court sitting at the Hague and study
the methods employed in settling dis
putes between nati^j by this so-call
ed tribunal which is controlled bythe
International Bankers. On his re-!
turn he will probably endeavor to per
suade the Senate to send a represen
tative to sit with this gang of judi
cial crooks. This policy will not sur
prise people who do not yet forget
that Senator Walsh was one of the
leaders in the plot to deliver feh«
destinies of the people of the United
States into the hands of a League of
Nations where England would have
six votes to America's one on the
on
(Continued on page 6)
CHARGES OFFICIALS USED POOL
MONEY FOR PRIVATE CAMPAIGN
Says Dwight R. Cresap Caused to Be Published in Montana
Wheat Grower, Defamatory Matter for the Purpose of
Defeating His Candidacy for Director Last Summer.
**********
* SCHNITZLER SHOWS FAITH *
* IN NOR THEA ST MONTANA *
* Poplar.—As an example of *
* faith he has in his home state, *
* Senator John Schnitzler, one of *
* the largest individual farmers in
* Montana, is putting in over 7,000 *
* acres ff crop this year on his *
* farms c.n the reservation. *
* For many years Schnitzler has *
* farmed on a large scale but this *
* is the largest acreage he has ev- *
* er put in. Last year Senator *
* Schnitzler, who owns the First *
* State Bank of Froid, is reported * I
* to have cleaned up a small for- * i
* tune on his crop and proof that * ;
* .he believes 1925 will be another
* banner years is shown by the *
* enlarged program he has mapped
** * I
* j
* !
* 1
j
:
I
1
,
T , - _ - . ...
Boys from Dooley Team Players
Wer Out of rorm and Numerous
Errors Made.
!
*
out.
* Schnitzler was in Poplar the
* latter part ci the week to bid on
* tribal land listed for sale.
* * *
*
LOCAL TEAM WINS
FROM DOOLEY BOYS
Slow Game is " tôn B* Plenty« ned
In a rather «low game last Sunday
at the Herald baseball pai^k, the Plen
tywood team won freon Dooley by a
score of 13 to 7.
i Ben Moe took the mound for Plen
tywood to begin the game and
Kingsley hurled for the Dooley
| boys. It was plainly discernible
from the first that Moe was not in
condition and he walked man af^er
i man, and after trying vainly to get
control of the ball he gave his posi
, tion to the regular pitcher for the
! local team, who hurled for two in
I nings holding the Dooley team score
j less. The Dooley pitched hurled the
game through the nine innings and
pitched a nice game although touch
ed freely for hits, and he, too, show
ed lack of condition, a natural result
of the first game of the season,
The Plentywood sluggers were on
the job, however, and gradually gain
ed on the lead which the Dooley
ball tossers amassed in the early in
| nings of the game and passed them
with a good score in the fifth inning,
after which "Wop" Bromberg took
the mound, and pitched a fine game
I for the remaining four innings,
Numerous errors were made by
j both teams which is to be expected
during the first games of the sea
I son as the boys have only had weath
i er which would permit but a few days
practice.
Both teams showed up well and
give promise of developing into fast
aggregations before the end of the
season. The Dooley team is to be
congratulated on the sTiowing they
made, when the fact is considered
that the whole team is made up of
borne boys, and we venture to say
that they will give any team in the
! county made up of local players en
j tirelv a hard run if they win from
them.
The Plentywood boys showed lack
of condition and made numerous er
rors which was to he expected, but
it is also knpwn that one of the
| players had been out the greater
share of the night before and no
; doubt some of his errors could be
traced to this source. It is a well
known fact that a baseball player
cannot spend the night in skylarking
and P la Y bal1 the next da Y and ^ is
i hc *> ed that Manager Fishbeck and!
i Captain Gulhckson lay down hard
; and . fast 111168 1 ™ reRard . to breaking
S training rules. The business men of
i Plentywood and the fans have done
! splendidly in support .of a real ball
team and they are entitled to real
service. Let us hope that the base
ba11 b °Y s wil1 realize this a " d "ill
not bave to 1)6 dis «plined or dis
cbar £ ed not appearing at their
best on the diamond. The whole
community is behind the ball team,
and errors which are bound cree P
] n . durin S a game even among the
bl f leaguers, are overlooked, but
wihen , ? baseball Player deliberately
P u *. 8 bim8elf ia a condltl °n where he
18 habl6 to make errors « n . easy outs,
'V e believe we are safe in saying
that the fans will not stand for such
performances.
, , , ....
statements published in the
* ana ^ heat Grower last summer,
' vere wh , oll y fals6 > malicious*defama
tory and unprivileged demands judg
ment the defendan t in the
SU JÎ? $°0,000. .
!^ b f complaint recites that in an
*lfî tack on Senator Anderson during
th ® campaign for the election of di
*j£? c ~ < ?f' s su ^f ed + tke Uresap com
bination, the "Montana Wheat Grow
er" of July 15, 1924, published a
statement tending to show that Sen
ator Anderson had not paid his mem
bership fee in the organization. This
statement was spread broadcast over
the state just preceding the election
and was intended to convey the idea,
the complaint charges, "that plain
tiff was then indebted to the Mon
tana Wheat Growers in the sum of
ten dollars upon a promissory note;
that plaintiff was then and prior
thereto falsely representing himself
&g a U p member of said Associ
St.
In a complaint filed in the District
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Dis
trict, Senator J. W. Anderson sues
the Montana Wheat Growers Associ
ation, Dwight R. Cresap, B. D. Hol
lenbeck, J. C. Root, B. A. Swall, Wm.,
McBridge, Joe Hoffman, Ted Berg
strom, John Walton and Joe Barrt
for libel.
Senator Anderson charges that the
Mon
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
«
ation; and that plaintiff was so false
ly representing himself for the pur
pose of being elected a director of
said Association.
MEAT OF THE
PLEADINGS
The meat of the whole story is
contained in paragraph seven of the
»
(Continued on last page)
PETER KREBSBACH
CROSSES DIVIDE
Dies at His Home in Plentywood Af
ter Lingering Illness of Several
Months of Anemia and Complica
tions Tuesday Noon.
FUNERAL SERVICES THIS
MORNING AT 10:30 O'CLOCK
Peter Krebsbach, one of the pro
of Plentywood and this section
of Montana, a man well known to all
pioneers and highly respected as
by all who knew him, crossed the
divide which separates this world
from the next, Thursday noon, after
a lingering illness of many months
duration, the result of anemia and
other complications,
Mr. Krebsbach came to Montana
from North Dakota to where he had
emigrated from Minnesota as a young
man and was one of the early citi
who did much to help build up
neers
a
man
zens
the city. .
Deceased was bcirn at Spring Hill,
Minnesota, April 21, 1875, being 50
years oid at the time of his death,
The funeral was held at the
Joseph's Catholic church, of which
deceased was a member, this, 1 nday,
| morning, at 10:30, Rev, Fr. O Rourke
j officiating, and after the solemn High
?*lass the remains were conveyed to
the Plentywood Catholic cemetery,
where they were laid to rest,
All of the business places of Pien
tywood were closed during the funer
al ceremonies.
Deceased leaves to mourn his de-
parture of this 11:2, hia wire and
! children, a son and wo daughters,
j Lloyd, Gladys and Glow,
i . Tbe . out-of-town relatives who at
tended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs
! Joe Krebsbach, Knox, N D., x.ick
Krebsbach, Kongsberg, N. Dg Mike
Krebsbach, Esmond, N. D.; FLoience
J> rebsbac N R Sm0 " d ' V n' n° hn
Krebsbach, Browns Valley, N. D.
The funeral was a large one and a
testimonial to the esteem with which
deceased was held in this community,
FATHER WILHELM CELE
BRATES SILVER JUBILEE
Father Jacob Wilhelm will cele
brate his silver jubilee of the 25th
anniversary of his initiation Into the
priesthood of the Roman Catholic
church on July 8th. The feast will
occur at Vibank, Sask., Can. Father
Wilhelm has been a missionary priest
in that territory laying north of
Raymond in Canada for a number of
years.
g ^ OFFICIALS TENTA
TiŸELY AGREE TO BUILD
Farmers Have Already Subscribed $115,000 of $250,000 of
Stock As Guarantee of Good Will tö Railroad Company
—Grading of Roadbed Will Start This Summer.
*
. tv «j i T tji
Fmst Big C ime ot reason In Plen
î> y Tw 68 ,, P i aCG JÎ t
Y 8y Afternoon at
4.UU Lioc ._ ;
rrr. u u * ,, j 1
The baseball fans are all pepped-i
up" over the game which the_ Pieu-,
tywood team wll play with Scobey
next Wednesday at the Herald ball
park m this city . ,
Scobey and Plentywood are ancient
enemies in the baseball world and
-
baseball in Sheridan or Daniels
county will want to miss.
nitche b r ey foÏ a the n !elîo d n bvîh ' name
0 f "Swcde" Eisb?re If thl
ot fewede Kisberg. it the tans
have followed baseball history in the
big league, they will remembe,- that
ÄÄ fcv wÄÄl
fc>ox at the time they won tneir last
P 6 ™?*! OT .
liveredby the famous t.virler and
the Scobey fielders are going to have
their hands full, even though they
have a $1500.00 pitcher.
This game is really a battle be
tween Sheridan county and Daniels
county as to who has the champion
team, and this is the first game of
a series of games which will be the
hardest fought games ever witnessed
in this section of the state. Scobey
would almost give up its county seat
to beat Plentywood and the local
boys are set for a battle in which no
slios can be made.
Every Sheridan county
fan should be at the Herald Ball
Parks Wednesday afternoon at 4:00
o'clock and boost for their home boys.
Scobey is coming down loaded to the
and it behooves the rooters
*
*********
* WALT WILLIAMS WILL
* SING ON RADIO KGW,
* MAY 27 FROM PORTLAND
•J
*
* The radio fans of Sheridan and *
* Daniels county arc notified that *
* Walt Williams, formerly a home- *
* steader of the Plentywood terri- *
* tory and a barber bc.th at Plen
* tywood and Scobey for a number *
* of years, leaving Sconey where *
* he had a shop a couple of years *
* ago, and locating at Portland, *
* Oregon, where he nas become *
* quite a noted singer, will sing *
* over broadcaster ivGW at Pc.rt- *
*~land on Wednesday, May 27th, at *
* 10 o'clock P. M,, western time *
* or 11 o'clock P. M. central time, *
* the time of this section, so the *
* News is informed t>y Atty. Paul *
* Babcock, who received the news *
* from Mr. Williams the first of *
* the week.
*
*
*
SCOBEY TO PLAY
HERE WEDNESDAY
.
this city and county to get out and
lie 'I ) beat them. _
The regular admission charge of
50c for adults and 25c for children
; under lo will be charged,
j
baseball
of
PLENTYWOOD TO
PLAY LAKE SUNDAY
Medicine Lake Has Strong Team and
Is Re-enforced to Meet Fast Plen
tywood Team.
Next Sunday, May 24th, the Plen
tywood ball team will journey
Medicine Lake, where they.will cross
bats with the baseball team of that
city.
to
A fast game is expected as Medi
cine Lake has a fine aggregation of
players this season and they
curing some of the best players
other nearby teams for this big
struggle.
The Plentyood sluggers are going
to have their hands full if they
turn with Medicine Lake's scalp and
a tight game is looked for from start
to finish.
A large delegation is going down
from Plentywood to cheer the local
team on to victory and the Medicine
Lake fans will be out 100 per cent.
are se
on
re
»
Opheim.—At a mass meeting held
here last Saturday, at which Great
Northern officials and about 500
farmers attended a tentative agree
ment was made towards the laying
of tracks from Scobey to Opheim at
an early date.
The railway president and general
counsel; A. H. Hoagland, chief engi
neer, and James Robinson, assistant
general freight agent.
Construction is contingent on the
farmers in the Opheim-Scobey dis
trict purchasing 2,500 shares of
Great Northern stock at par as evi- ,
dence of their good will toward the
railway company. Within a few
hours after Mr. Gilman stated his
proopsitic.n, $115,000 of the $250,000
stock guarantee had been subscribed,
and officials of the North Country
Railroad committee announced that
they could raise the balance in two
or three weeks.
Grading of the roadbed will he
started this summer, immediately
following the approval of the plan by
the beard of directors of the Great
Northern system, and rails will be
laid next year. Mr. Gilman said that
it was proposed to have the line in
operation by October 1, 1926,
Mr. Gilman and his associates ar
rived in the Opheim country last
week Thursday in response to an in
Ration of the North Country Rail
road committee of which W. C. Kahle
of Opheim is chairman. Other offi
ci als of the committee are John Ma
son, vice chairman; H. N. Isaacs, sec
vet and p F . Smith, treasurer,
n|s ^ mmittee has been workillg on
the pro oaition of tti the G » eat
Nort ï, e rn interested in the proposed
! exension for several months
Mr Gil Ml . H land and Mr
i p„„v,
S=
ÜSTSf * SSS
hv thp railwav
' B ^ re he terms on
Ä the Great Northern would
th extension, Mr. Gilman made
| ... • _ rps , pnt condi .
| tfe" rf'X Taüway com"^ emm
eraän « its ear " in « s - its «USes, and
itg general f u tu re outlook.
The basis of the sale of stock to
! the farmers is par, which is $100.00
?' 0 n 1 'the P market todav k 65'
1 ern stock on the Tnarket toda Y ls b5 -
1
MR. AND MRS. CHRIS
DALL CELEBRATE
GOLDEN WEDDING
At the Lutheran Church at Antelope,
Sunday, May 17th
Hundred Guests Present.
Over Two
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Dali of Ante
lope celebrated their Golden Wed
ding at the Lutheran church at that
city, Sunday, May 17th. Services
were held at the churoTi and Rev.
Egge cf the Plentywood Lutheran
church officiated, before relatives,
descendants and friends to a number
of two hundred.
After the service the relatives and
guests repaired to tfte basement of
the church where a bountiful feast
was served.
The oldyweds were tne recipients of
several presents of gold.
There were present eight children
and ten grandchildren, besides Mrs.
Thompson of Grenora, N. D., who was
a guest at the wedding of Mr. and
Mrs. Dali fifty years ago, on the
17th of May, in Hutchison county,
Minnesota. A son and daughter, who
reside in Sheridan county, Jake Dal!
and Mrs. Guilder Hovet were
pres
ent, besides a son Obert Dali, with
whom Mr. and Mrs. Dali have resid
ed for the past several years, were
present, together with guests from
Minnesota and Canada.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Dali are pio
neers in Sheridan county, coming
here with their sons and daughters
many years ago, where they have
sen the country change from a wild
prairie to a garden spot. Both
joy good health and hope
many years more.
cn
to live
Read the ads in this issue of the
Producers News. They contain .
value for th e person who wishes
save money.
real
to

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