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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, June 05, 1925, Image 4

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The McClintock Case
Reads Like Fiction
Gold - Greed- Romance - Death
In a Chicago court room sits a
lawyer—interested in a criminal case
as he has never been interested be
fore. He is William Darling Shep
herd, now on trial, charged with hav
ing killed his "millionaire orphan
ward, Wm. N. McClintock with ty
phoid germs.
In the evidence now being intro
duced, the state will attempt to show
that a plot more than twenty years
old existed in the Shepherd home to
obtain the McClintock fortune.
Shepherd and his wife,
Shepherd, were co-guardians of "Bil- ;
McClintock through the will of j
Mrs. McClintock who died in 1909.
The Shepherds were living with
Mrs. McClintock at that time, Mrs.
Shepherd and Mrs. McClintock hav
ing been school day triends. McClin
tock, Sr. w T as killed in an automobile
accident shortly after the birth of
Billy" which brought the Shepherds
into the McClintock home.
Young McClintock, who had just
passed his twenty-first birthday and
was engaged to be married to Miss
Isabelle Pope, died in the Shepherd
McClintock home, December 4, 1924.
A will, drawn by Shepherd and at
tested b'y Shepherds house servant
a few months after young McClintock
had reached Ms majority, made tke
Shepherds chief beneficiary. It also
provided for Isabelle Pope an annuity
of $8,000.
The fact that Miss Pope had waited
outside the sick room with a license
to marry him, as young McClintock
died, attracted public attentiez to the
case.
Julie G.
• i
ly
..
Rumor followed rumor as to the
attitude of the Shepherds toward i
their ward's financée at that time,
until the district attorney took notice
and an investigation w T as stared.
The investigation developed evidence
which brought Hairy Olson, a Munici
pal Court Chief Justice, Into the case !
with charges that the plot of the
Shelpherds to obtain the McClintock
fortune also involved the deaths of
McClintock's motht* and Dr. Olson,
buried sixteen and three years, re-1
spectively, revealed mercury in suffi- .
dent amount in M*». McClintock's
body to have cause death, examiners |
say.
The confession ot C. C. Faiman,
head of a science school in Chicago,
that he had supplied Shepherd with
typhoid germs, taught him to keep
them and administer them—and that
he was promised $100,000, is the
state's strongest care,.
Faiman was jointly indicted with
\
>
Shepherd but granted a separate
trial.
Mrs. Shepherd was named in the
verdict by the coroner's jury as be
ing guilty with her husband—but was
vindicated when a grand jury refused
to indict her.
That is the McClintock case to
date. It is holding the interest of
the whole nation as the trial pro
gresses. What will the verdict be?
MONTANA OIL GOES UP
AND G. N. BURNS COAL
IN MONTANA ENGINES
SPOKANE.—Forty oil burning
freight locomotives operated be
tween Havre, Mont., and Spokane
by the Great Northern railroad
are being changed to burn coal
it is announced by railroad offi
cials here.
Increase price of Montana oil
was the reason ascribed.
Because California oil is rela
tively cheaper, locomotives of
the road west of here will con
tinue to burn oil, it was said.
Locomotives east of Havre have
always burned coal.
iR
k !1
»
if
For
The Man Behind the Gun
■i V-'
The Beating Shakers
Protection
They Save All the Grain
The minute the head of a
bundle cornes from the feeder, the
first t hresherman,the Big Cy lind zr,
tears into it. The lig teeth of the
cylinder and concaves are set by
hand, close enough to thresh every
kernel cut of the head, but not so
close as to crack grain.
At the speed of a mile a min
ute, the Big Cylinder throws the
flying straw' and grain to the
second thresherman, the "Man
Behind the Gun The grain gees
through its grate, is stopped by
the check plate and saved.
More than 90 per cent of the
grain is separated right there, and
separated forever, in a Nichols &
Shepard thresher.
The third thresherman, the
Steel Winged Beater , then takes a
whack at the straw, batting it
down to the fourth thresherman,
the Beating Shakers, that bed, beat,
beat the straw, 'till the last kernel
of grain is beaten out and saved.
Nichols & Shepard—25-50
Oil-Gas is 2-cylinder heavy duty
tractor that pulls the full rated
capacity on either belt or draw
bar w T ork. It threshes steady as
a ^steamer."
Against
Fire, Lightning, Cy
clone, Windstorm
Get a
POUCY
in
the
NORTHWESTERN
NATIONAL
NICHOLS e SHEPARD COMPANY
THE RE D RIVER SPECIA L L I ^ JE
'Threjhcrs
T r a C t o r s
See Us For Full Information
For Rates
See "Jerry" the lit
tle agent.
MEDICINE LAKE, MONT. '
Call or Address
»
if?
G. G. POWELL
Plentywood ,Mont.
Shepherd Faces Jury
On Murder Charge
Tel
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Wm. D. Shepherd, accused of
killing Wm. McClintock his "mil
orphan" ty
phoid germs, as he faced the court
in the trial now in progress at
Chicago, The State is working for
hanging.* Below, Mrs. Shepherd,
who was charged with being equal
ly guilty but was freed when the
Grand Jury refused to indict her.
\
'Because it SAVES AU the GRAIN*—
The Four Threshermen
—The Steel
I j /^Winged Beater
The Big Cylinder
1
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V- V
r,a
CAN CHAUTAUQUA OPER
ATE WITHOUT GUARANTEE
Can Chautauqua and Lyceum Com
panies come into the smaller towns
and cities without a guarantee ?
Frank N. Mitchell, who is known as
a school man and publicity agent
throughout the Northwest, says they
can. The Misner Playmakers which
he is to bring to the Fanner-Labor
Temple next Tuesday evening, June
9th, is an experiment he is conduct
ing to prove his contention. He has
bought this company from the Mis
ner School of the Spoken Word of
Omaha and is playing representative
towns "on his own.
ranks with the best in the Chautau
qua and Lyceum fields and the pro
gram is built to entertain. Variety
is the keynote. Mr. Mitchell has
adopted the slogan: "A Mitchell At
1 traction is a Good Attraction" and
the people sponsoring the movement
say that he will make good his prom*
I ises.
••
His company
, _ , ™ -r ~ „ Tm -,
ÄCÄIN^T MftNT I IFF
ütîLriiilU I IflA/i* I • Lili
Holding that money deposited in a
bank is payable legally on check or
certificate of deposit presented across
the bank's counter m Business hours
and not on demand made by a letter,
George M. Bourquin of the federal
court of Montana has decided in favor
of the defendant company in the suit
of the Montana Life Insurance oom
panypany against th e American Sure
i ty company. The Montana Life In
surance company brought an action
! to recover from the surety company
$9,000 it lost in the First National
Bank of Higihwood which it alleged
was insured by the defendant. At
the time of the bank's closing the
plaintiff company had $13,000 on de
posit in the institution.
In its defense the surety company
alleged that it had given the life in
surance company notice prior to the
bank s closing that the latter should
immediately withdraw its deposit
from the bank, and that the plaintiff
company failed to follow these' in
structions. The Montana Life Insur
ance company answered that it
T
Lt
m
IV
iAjLs
,
, _ ■, * iad
made demand and introduced letters
to support its contention that demand
had been made.
Judge Bourquin, in holding that
the writing of the letter does not con
stitute a demand for the money on
deposit within the meaning of the
law and that the defendant compa-1
ny is therefore not liable on its bond,
says in part:
Money deposited in bank is pay
able on check or certificates of depos
it presented across the bank's coun
ter in business hours for payment
then and there made into the
hands of the presenter of the paper,
That alone is the legal demand that |
the bank is bound to recognize, that |
is by this bond stipulated and the
plaintiff made none such. Letters
even if sent and received are not a
legal demand. Plaintiff failed to ;
perform its contract, and condition
upon which alone defendant engaged
to idemnify plaintiff was not satis
fied, and the bond expired without li
ability imposed upon defendant."
The law firm of Stewart and Blown
of Helena represented the American
Surety company in the litigation and
Gunn, Rasch and Hall of Helena, rep
resented the Montana Life Insurance
company.
NORSE GATHER
FOR CENTENNIAL
MUCH INTEREST AROUSED IN
MONTANA BY CELEBRATION
ON JUNE 7, 8 AND 9—GOV.
ERICKSON TO ATTEND.
Much interest is being stirred in
Montana by the coming Norse cen
tennial w-hich will be celebrated at
the Minnesota state fair grounds on
June 7, 8 and 9. Among the dis
tinguished personage expected to be
present are President Coolidge and
the premier of Canada, as well as the
chief executives of several states.
The centennial marks the anniver
sary of the landing in America of a
small boat that brought 53 passen
gers to establish the first Norwegian
settlement in America. Since this
party of pioneers arrived and settled
in New- York state, many thousands
have come and have helped to found
an agricultural empire in the north
west and build this district into the
garden spot of the country,
Many persons, of Norse descent in
this state are planning to attend the
centennial,
MONTANA GOVERNOR
TO ATTEND.
Gov. Erickson has signified his in
tenti-on to lie present. The Montana
tention t 0 be present. The Montana
j executive was named after John
j Erickson, who discovered the Moni
: tor type of vessels which revolution
ized naval warfare in this hemisphere,
Governor Erickson is expected by all
1 who know him to live up to the magic
of his name and make a great hit at
I the Centennial.
! --
j JUDGE 1. G. DENNY
!
!
CALLED BY DEATH
BUTTE.—lullus G. Denny, 66, at
, torney in Butte for many years and
prominent in th e Democratic party,
died Friday evening following an op
eration for acute appendicitis,
j was a candidate for governor in the
j Democratic primaries last summer,
; had been a candidate for congress in
1 the primaries two years before, and
j served as a member of the Montana
legislature in 1923-24. He is sur
j vived by a son, Captain Thomas R.
California,
; WAS SOCIALIST CANDIDATE
In the big socialist campaign of
1912 to wrest Silver Bow county
1 from the
He
Denny, stationed -at the Presidio in
panies Judge Denny was candidate
for Judge of the District Court. He
soon after,relapsed back into the old
party folcls and was candidate for
Governor in the Democratic Pri
maries last fall. Judge Denny was
well known throughout tho state as
an orator.
Misner Playmakers
Show Here June 9
The Misner Playmakers wiho will
appear here, Tuesday, June 9th, at
the Farmer-Labor Temple is one of
the best known companies of the i
kind on the platform today. They
are products of the Misner School of
the Spoken Word, the Home of j
Omaha's Little Theatre Movement.
Many in town have heard the Misner
programs over the radio and are
somewhat acquainted with Mr. Mis
ner's work. The company to show i
here is known as the "Biggest Little j
Company on the Platfrom". It con- 1
sists of four artists presenting a
program that is unique, full of ac
tion and light enough for summer
enjoyment. It is not a high-brow re- j
citai, but a delightful entertainment '
for those who enjoy the best,
company carries an orchestra and :
special scenic effects.
The
:
N. P. CASE MAY HANG
Washington.—How many mil
lions of dollars a comma may
sometimes be worfln to the gov
ernment was a question raised
today by D. F. McGowan, attor
ney for the forest service, before
the congressional commission in
vestigating grants to the North
ern Pacific Railway company.
Mr, McGowan contended that *
* in copies of the original land *
* grant act of 1870, a comma was *
omitted from a lengthy sentence
providing for disposal of mort- |
gaged lands defining their stat
us and specifying the rights of
the company in them; and he
held that this emission gave the
authority to withhold the land
from settlers longer than w-as in
tended by congress.
To substantiate his position
that the correct English required
a comma where, he said, one was
placed in the original act, Mr.
McGowan presented a letter giv
ing a grammatical analysis of the
sentence. This letter, signed by
Prof. Tucker Brocke, secretary of
the English department of Yale,
and chairman of the Yale gradu
ate school, and George H. Nettle
ton, chairman of the English de
partment at Yale, Mr. McGowan
contended, supported his argu
ment.
In addition, he read a supreme
court opinion stating that con
gress was presumed to know the
rules of grammar which led
Chairman Sinnott to remark,
aside from the commission's rec
ord that "we ought to give this
,\
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I
What a joy comes to the wife and
the kiddies when "Daddy
bers them with a Long Distance call !
His actual presence comes over the
wire with his familiar voice, his in
quiries about their health and the
little happenings of the household.
Every Bell telephone is a
Long Distance station, inviting
the traveler to communicate
I with those who are dearest to
Is him, those who miss him. most.
Days are shorter to the home
folks when they know they
will hear from "Daddy,
calls are major events in the
life of the family.
And Station-to-Station
make telephoning inexpensive.
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Bell System
<-v
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One Policy
One System
Universal Service
an ' 1 all Directed
toward
Better Service
A
'rai»V
The Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Co.
i
judge a raise in salary."
James B. Kerr, counsel for the
railway company, took the post
j|
l!i

Plenty wood Auto Co.
Is the Exclusive Agent for
The Famous
il
'*!
MAXWELL aud CRYSLER
j
AUTOMOBILES
Prices ranging from $1033 to $2443.00.
summer
and enjoy the nice
Buy a car now
We are always ready to give you a
days,
demonstration.
Our Battery Service department is the best
in Plentywood. We give you the benefit of
our long experience filling, repairing
charging batteries.
and re
work. \ our car
We guarantee our repair
will run like new after it has gone through our
We also do Oxy-Acetey
overhauling process,
lene welding. Come in and see us.
Samuelson & ledders
Plentywood, Montana
whether
tion that the comma,
omitted, or not, was of no conse
quence. • _

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