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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, July 10, 1925, Image 6

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SOVIET GRAIN TRUST RUN
FOR USE OF PEASANTS
Prevents Speculation and Suffering—Aids Industries—Buys
Thru Co-Operatives Produce Plan—Enter Flour Produc
tion Where Capitalists Have Been Taking Huge Profits
to Detriment of Producers of Both City and Country.
MOSCOW, (By Mail)—About forty per cent of all the grain
marketed in Russia passes thru the hands of the State Grain
Trust, an organization just now celebrating its three year anniver
sary. Three years ago, when the Soviet Union went over from the
basis of war Communism to free trade between city and country,
this trust was formed out of the remnants of the old Commissari
at of Supply, an organization which existed to commander grain
and other supplies and apportion them where needed by the emer
gencies of the state.
Under the new economic policy, the*
peasant could sell grain where he
chose, and the function of the new
grain trust was to buy it from him,
trying if possible to control enough of
the market so that the peasant might
, - , . •, . ,i_
be protected against P^yate specula
tion. It was this trust, last aut
umn, when the crop failure started
... e • - „voir, orw i
wild shifts °£. p £ lce ® Stabilized
hvestock, whioh swiftly^ stabilized
markets and prevented much suffer-.
"Great is the importance of the
State Grain Trust," says Smirnov,
commissar of agriculture, in an in
terview given on the third anniver
sury of the founding of the trust.
"This trust, newly organized three,
vears ago, had to build a market for
peasant produce, stabilize prices, and
keep this all in harmony with the in
terests of state industry, .he condi
tions of our transport and our monop
oly of foreign commerce.
mg.
IMPORTANCE OF
GRAIN TRUST
AIDS
INDUSTRIES.
"Capital was very scant, and con
sisted chiefly of leftover supplies of
the department of supply, most of
them the things which ihe peasants
had not wanted. Bank financing was
still imperfect and inadequate,
in its first year this Grain Trust
handled the equivalent of 45 million
. bushels of grain. (This figure reduces
the animal products anti other com-,
modities 10 their grain equivalent.)
This was almost twice the amount ex
pected for its first year's work. Oyer
half of this went straight into aiding
state industries, helping put them on
their fee;.
But the big achievement of the
first years was the building of its
apparatus, both for buying and sell
ing, using for this purpose the net of
co-operative stores, wherever possible,
y r £ at exis;ed.
By the second and third years the
work could be much widened, so that
now the State Grain Trust is handl
ing 40 per cent of all the peasants'
grain reaching the market. It has
partly put through a new plan for
lines * of grain elevators, which will
greatly strengthen its work. Ihe
comme, via. production of (lou, ror
Î f ,hU t™.t ^
li ansferred to this trust. . -
Kihinchuk, head of the Central Co
operative Union of Russia, also pays
Yet
BUYS THROUGH *
CO-OPERATIVES
his respects to the Grain Trust in an
interview regarding its relations with
the cooperatives. "We have had the
most attentive and kindly treatment
from the Grain Trust," he says, "both
in. our central organization and in
our local scaitered branches. Our
contracts with them have increased
steadily. _
"In its first year the Grain Trust
did only 14 per cent .of its buying and
16 per cent of its selling through
the co-operatives; this has now in
creased to 25 per cent and 29 per cent
respectively. Actually the proportion
of sales thru co-operative organs is
much larger, as only the large scales
made on contract are listed as made
'with the co-operatives/ while very
many sales thru smaller co-opera
tives count as if made by the "Grain
Trust's own branches," as these
smaller co-operatives often have that
function. I should Judge that about
half of all the Grain Trust's sales are
really thru co-operative stores. As
our net of co-operatives grows strong
* -
GOITRE VANISHES
St. Louis County Banker Saved An
Operation by a Home Treatment
Note: It would be illegal to publish
these statements if not true.
W. J. Vance, Banker, Valley Park,
Mo.. says: "Two days before using
Sorbol-Quadruple, I had a bad hemor*
rhage in my throat caused by tight-1
êning which produced severe cough
ing. Twenty-four hours from first
application of Sorbol-Quadruple I felt
relief, and in forty-eight hours no
ticed it was reducing. In three weeks,
one side has vanished and the relief
is bevond expression. * You make
use of this and I will gladly answer
all questions."
Manufactured. by Sorbol Company,
Mechanicsburg, O. Sold by ail diug
stores. Locally at Plentywood Drug.
♦ •
V
Idle Hour Pool Hall
V
« *
When in Plentywood we invite your patronage. We
- 1 *
have a full line of CIGARS and SOFT DRINKS—
three tables for Pool and Billiards.
o
V
Geo. Wright, Prop.
4
Plentywood
Montana
_ • _
o
er, we expect the grain trust to leave
the retail trade in our hands.
Enters Flour Production
Something over one hundred and
I fifty million dollars is the present
j y ver of the Stale Grain
••
I Trust of Russia. Kamenev, in pre
i dieting its future steps, says: "When
1 ever possible it is using even build
co-operatives to handle the re
^ trad J in the villaRes . It must
now take up the special field of flour
production, where more than any
*vhere else, the competition of private
capital has been felt. It will also do
mare export. The state can rely on
this trust as one of the most serious
-1 • ools for regulating the grain
mar
ket.
It is rather startling for an Ameri
can, just returned from the United
States to Russia, to see how openly
and cheerfully they expect "trusts" to
do price-fixing and to "control the
market.'' What a completely differ
ent meaning the word "trust" has in
For the Russian
trusts are state-owned, and directed
for the benefit of the workers.
the two countries!
/innT\ r \*r/\ HH\T i ittv
A xTRONOlVI Y A nil I
I *1111/
OUR WEATHER
;
1
J THE GREAT TELESCOPE
At p as adena, California, the Mt.
Wilson telescope is by far the larg
es ^ j n ^he world and on account of
some 0 f th e discoveries with this new
| instrument we believe that a descrip
^j on 0 f ^lis g rea t machine and the
stor y 0 f ^s installation will be of in
j terest to many of the readers of the
p ro ducers News.
; Q ne ^ moP t important pieces
" f tw* great instrument is the 100
inch piece of glass that is placed in
, e "P °' telescope. This one
f™** an £r°T
hal * î on % J h . e Pans Glass ' Vork f
ex P en merited for three jears to cast
a P 1Gce that would be acceptable, then
thl , s taken b / bttat to Pasadena
thÆtesTeÂi t ttek
gfffpacked
i" P*™«™ "ken by autos timed
„„K- & imies per hour up to
thé 1 lop ox Mt. Wilson when it was
' placed in the top of this great teles
I cope,
The telescope hangs in a carriage
By Prof. G. R. Pettie
weighing five hundred tons and all is
covered by a canopy weighing one
hundred tons. The movements of all
this machinery is controlled by elec
tricity, •
After the canopy is removed and
this great lens pointed to that point
in the heavens desired, then the clock
; timing machinery is applied to hold
the instrument back against the ro
tation of the Earth upon its axis and
holding to one point so Jong as the
operator chooses,
This telescope is a Carnegie
' dowment and is used mostly
technical purposes. With it one can
measure the size and distance of the
giant starts and go beyond and bring
into view new universes that the
light we now see of some of the great
suns starts on its way a million years
! ago.
Since writing my last week's fore
cast, we have a number of complaints
from different localities of scarcity of
moisture. This condition may pre
vail locally, but in general, we be
, lieve that there, will be sufficient
i moisture, but the most we can expect
, now is local showers.
en
for
I
1 _
BAND MUSIC AT
MOTHERS' CAMP
- . muinuw
' w ^ ' - ,
The Plentywood Band will play # at
the Mother s Camp, at the evening
program, July \ . Chancellor
Brannon, of the State University, will
1 be on the program the same evening,
There will also be free movies,
Indications are that the attendance
at the Camp will be a record breaker
f° r Mother s Camps in th® State,
The program will b® very much
worth while both from an education
as as >a recreational stand
point. Anyone in the county is in
'*ited to attend.
Remember the date July loth to
18th.
Bakery*
*
UM. hr OUdjn Baku
S ALLIE —beautiful and vivacious leader of the debutante set.
ANNE CODDINGTON—Who had gone to school with Sallie and was her
best friend until she made up her mind to marry.
CURTISS WRIGHT—A brilliant young architect who* has achieved an in
ternational reputation. He disapproves of the "jazz" type.
TED BILLINGS—Whose main objective in life is arranging "petting par
ties" with pretty girls.
ELLIE MITCHELL—Whose finishing-school education has taught her the
latest and most effective, if unconventional, methods of combatting
ennui.
WARREN FISHER—A gay philanderer of Wall Street whose time is oc
cupied chiefly in avoiding his wife,
MARJORIE AND BOB CHENOWETH—Of the married set and Sallie's
staunch friends
Curtiss Wright comes to Jackson
ville, Florida to draw plans for a
railroad company of which Sallie's !
father is president. He is invited
to stay in Sallie's home. Propinquity ;
and Sallie's undeniable charm win
.him in spite of his avowed aversion
to the artificial atmosphere in which
she moves.
Sallie, being Sallie, gets lonely, the
night after she and Curtiss become
engaged while Curtiss is away on
business and goes on a cocktail par
Anne Coddingtcn tells Curtiss
hoping that she, herself, will find ad
miration in his eyes and Curtiss,
though he still loves Sallie, stays
away from her and becomes attentive
to Anne.
Sallie, from pique, starts to Miami
to attend a house party being given
by the Divines who are nouveau riche,
Warren Fisher, who has made love
to Sallie in Pensacola, boards the
same train and announces that he
too, is going to the house party,
persuades Sallie to get off at Holly
wood, have dinner at the Country
Club and then drive on to Miami,
which he says is a pleasant distance
But time slips by and Sallie,
tv.
He
away.
Mrs. Fisher Apologizes to Sallie, But—
Yourself!" was Elite's frank ans- your husband's age begin to look
outside diversion.
I I
wer.
Mrs. Fisher rose In indignation.
"Really, you are impossible. Just
what do you mean?" she demanded.
"There's no use getting excited
about it," Elbe's voice was unusually
calm but in her eyes, there was a
glint of bitterness, of lost faith in
humanity and of a love that had
turned to ashes.
"Just this,'' she answered, "you are
the sort of woman who allows her
self to "go" mentally after she's had
her husband so long that she regards
him as a fixture. Oh. there's no ex
cuse for it, especiall ywith you, for
you haven't even babies. A man like
your husband longs for the com
panionship of someone whom he can
discuss subjects that are lively and
entertaining. Oh, I don't mean com
mittee meetings anti Refuge homes
for starving Russians. I mean
wants scintillating, responsive con
versation. He can talk about
Reparation Plan at the office. He'd
like to hear what you think of
"Iris Storm" and what Michael Arien
meant whe she said she had a -Mpag
an body and a ChiseUmrst ,4aiud."
He would like a few devàt stories
to go along with his caviar—instead
of a resume of Y'OUR activities dur
ing the past twenty-four hours.
Mrs. Fisher hung on her every
word.
he
the
"
Has he discussed our private life
with you. Miss Mitchell ? That is,
at least,, inexcusable and an offense
against good taste for which you,
yourself, can find no pardon."
So the shoe fits, does it?" Ellie
flung back at her, 'really, I had not
meant to be personal. It Is the usual
thing that happens when men about
..
If'
ID
it
Id
FARMERS EEVA
TOR COMPANY
OF OUTLOOK
OUTLOOK, MONT.
r»* '
I.
, . , , .
We Wish to thank ail those
who saw fit to attend the an
. , , .
nual meeting tor being pres
en j anc j taking part in the dis

CUSSlon.
We àrè again handling the
twine that we handled last
year and we want you to
come in and make known
your wants, the price will be
just in line with any other
twine that is sold, and any
profits we make on it will be
next
in your DIVIDENDS
year.
COME IN ANYWAY
FARMERS ELEVATOR COM
PANY OP OUTLOOK
T. J. Larson, Mgr.
realizing the lateness of the
and that she is unchaparoned be
comes nervous and insists that they
. . .. _
■ 16 Divines,
* car breaks down and they are
forced to take refuge in an unfre
quented Inn in a small town. Before
Sallie retires Warren Fisher enters
her room and makes desperate love
to her. She repulses him and lie
comes terrified when he admits that
j the car story- was planned so that he
! might be with her alone. She rushes
from the room and
hotel notices a suspicious looking man
in the lobby who watches her every
move. She arrives at the Divines,
dishevelled and late. She receives a
; cool welcome but refuses to talk. The
next day Mrs. Divine, afraid of her
flimsy social position, has Ellie ask
Sallie to leave. She and Ellie return
1 home and Sallie received a note from
! Mrs. Warren Fisher saving that she
1 Fisher calls, discloses that she had a
! detective watching Sallie and her
| husband intends to name Sallie in a
j suit for separation; Ellie steps in to
1 the defense of Sallie—now read:
hour
leaving the
on
j will call for a private talk.
Mrs.
"You seem to have a fund of in
formation mi the subject.
"I've been the object for their con
Ellie
••
fessions for several seasons,
admitted, "and yet, knowing all of it,
I have not been immune to their flat
tering attention."
Y r ou mean?"
I That is my affair, Mrs. Fisher.
Personalities are contemptible. I
have only dealt in them to give you
the benefit of my experience.
"Thank you, I thinL; I understand
better," she said falteringly, "then
you believe I could win Warren's love
back if—
"Certainly, if you want it" and
she mi K i.i — ,..«u "personally
M
..
..
• •
I wouldn't.
But what must I do about the Inn
episode and—
"I would suggest that you apolo
gize to Sallie."
No no," I interrupted, "that is
scarcely necessary and besides, it
doesn't make any difference,
voice was peculiarly listless. Too
many things. I suppose, had happen
ed in swift succession.
But, if she's innocent and it's not
her fault, I AM sorry and" she hesi
tated, looking down at 4he toe of her
slipper.
"Yes, what is it, Mrs. Fisher?" I
44
• •
• *
**
my
a
3lll3IH3lll3lH3>H3lll31H3HI3lll311l3ni3»l3HI3HI3ni3»l3lll3HI3HiaiH3HI3IH3IH3lll3|
FORDS
D
D
D
D
I
As an authorized dealer for the FORD MOTOR
COMPANY we offer you efficient and prompt FORD
service, capable mechanics and a complete line of
FORD parts at your command.
I
s.
vS
Ford Cars
• Ford Trucks
Fordsons
D
ID
D
D
Lincolns
f OXY-ACETYUNE WELDING
LATHE WORK DEPARTMENT
Si
A
. r
. . y --- .
g
MARKUSON EPLER CO.
MONTANA
i
MEDICINE LAKE, :
asked, sensing trouble. .
I'm feorry I mentioned your name
to these friends with whom I am
staying. I was so upset, I couldn t
help it. Really, I couldn't."
"You mean you told them vile
things about my character and con
nected mv name with your husband!
I demanded.
"Why, yes, but I'll tell them I was
mistaken."
Ah! the cruelty of it, the unfair
ness. I could see them, the eager
ness with which older women tear
into particles a young girl's reputa
tion, I could hear them exchanging
and each time exaggerating the story.
"She would tell them fchat she was
mistaken" as if that ever lessened
the damage. Already telephones
had carried the juicy bit of gossip
over the wires. And at the same hour
the Church Circles and Sewing Cir
cles would have it.
And Father and Curtiss Wright.
How glad Anne Coddington would be
..
..
when she heard that ugly story.
What was it that Curtiss Wright
had told me, "You who run in poppy
fields are sa drugged with the per
fume and color of the petals that it's
almost impossible not to get lost in
the maze of blowing blossoms.''
"Get lost" yes, that was it. For
with the story abroad, all the loveli
ness of life was fleeting. Every
where, I'd be conscious of sly glances
and surreptitious nudges freighted
with moaning. One moment of mali
cious scandal and the whcJe future of
a young girl's life could be changed
from sunlight to darkness.
T did not arise when Mrs. Fisher
departed. I sat staring out at a tree
beside a window. It lifted its branch
es and in its top was a bird's nest—
that little symbol of peace and safe
ty.
That was the kind of love that
had wanted. My little nest. My mate.
Children.
been the things I had desired and
yet I had thought that all this reck
less romping had been a necessary
prelude through which I could pass
unscathed and untarnLshed.
In spite of my continued frivolity,
Curtiss, had, evidently, not ceased
All the time these had
love me. Why, he had even sent
lillies of the valley the morning
m
I A Man's Meal
&
*
»
t
< >
o
* * Nine out of ten men, if you
\ ' ask them what meat they enjoy
i ► best of all, will answer as one
<► —STEAK.
. nui*
WESTS CAFE
o
* »
V
« •
j Plentywood,
Montana
m \f j o ni j Bob Cbcn*
my t * ei ? aI ^ ur ^ 4 . °5 ha t upon my return
tired of Anne and would
he would b ^ ^ the past foolish
06 wai g
ne 5f J° ^ ' Not with the weight
of sor< iicl scandal resting hea\i >
mv shoulders. . T . .
P It w __ g0 f ar from the thing I ha ,
Jntid oJ there, the soft blue of
the twUig ht, the sweetness of God s
c i ean aj r , the lighted v
£ i re€s> bursting with fresh buds
... little buttonieres upon
branches
Springtime!
A ^ (} for me What?
, on u. «.ft silently without an
the
answer.
(To be Continued j)
Youngest G. A. R. Member?
geventy-two
Seconds,
Warren D. _
years of age. of New Rochelle, N. i.,
claims to be the youngest living mera
Grnnd Army of the Re
ber of the
public.
Old Painting of Roae.
The earliest known painting of
recently found on frescoed
In ancient ruins at Knossos in
Island of Crete and dates from
about 1G00 B. C.
rose was
plaster
the
A W
v
fl
I
to
me
of
K
SAY "BAYER ASP RIN" and INSIST I
t
Unless you see the "Bayer Cross" on tablets you are
not getting the genuine Bayer Aspirin proved safe
by millions and prescribed by physicians 24 years for
Colds Headache Neuralgia Lumbago
Pain Toothache Neuritis Rheumatism
■■

if
-
V
V
••
which contains proven directions, j
Handy "Bayer" boxes of 12 tablets
Also bottles of 24 and 100—Druggists. *
Aspirin is the trade mark at Beyer ManoXactnre at kioooeceticecideeter of SehcjUcedd
*•

*

A4
*
>
m
||
*
T
*
I
Readiness
To Serve
5

%
One of the chief values of the
telephone is its constant, continu
ous, consistent readiness to serve.
The receiver is always on the hook,
the operator is always ready to re
ceive the call, the exchange through
which the call is to be made is al-.
ways there, ready to serve.
In a retail store the clerk may be
busy, the particular article wanted
may be sold out or the place closed
to celebrate a holiday. But the
telephone is always ready.
It costs the Mountain States
Telephone and Telegraph Com
pany many thousands of dollars
every year to maintain its .lines
ready to serve,
pense could be lessened if the work
men were permitted to take their
time about repairs. But, to keep
up the standard of service which is
always the Company's ideal, re
pairs must be made NOW.
The telephone must be ready to
serve, whatever the emergency.
g
44
Much of this ex
I
i
#1%
y
s
%
y
3
#
y
y
The Mountain States
Telephone and Telegraph
Company
l
g
i
One Policy, One System, Universal
Service, end All Directed Toward
Better Service
y
y
y
y
"9
y
m
turn me over
cEr^r- p]o
(5'nenbe üape/A Japxin
yj jnd non
I
mm
M
mW* 1
V:
i
Lifre Ts^runtfed
catfish complained
to her mate—

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