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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, August 21, 1925, Image 8

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OCCIDENT ELEVATOR
BOOSTS WHEAT PRICE
AT PLENTYWOOD
Last Tuesday the Occident elevator
boosted the price of wheat an even
ten cents in Plenty wood. The price
here this morning for No. 1 dark hard
is $1.52 and the highest quotation on
wheat to arrive in Minneapolis is only
$1.78 which makes a small margin
if the wheat from here does not get
the very highest price at the termi
George Lindgreen, the agent for
the International Elevator Co., stated
upon being interviewed that he is go
ing to follow the Occident prices.
Fay Bradley, manager of the Farm
ers' elevator is yet undecided about
following the Occident, as the station
grade for wheat at Plentywood is not
fully established, he is not sure if the
average wheat from here will demand
top prices. ■
O. F. Aplin, superintendent of the
Occident elevator, was in Plentywood
Wednesday when a News reporter
asked him regarding the boost of
prices, he replied that they needed the
wheat and were willing to pay for it,
but did not state if these prices would
last or if the Occident were paying
the same prices at other points. It
is understood that the prices at Re
serve were raised the sam day and
that the Farmers and Victoria eleva
tors are paying the new prices. There
is considerable comment in the streets
to the reason that actuated the
Occident in raising the price at this
time. It is freely hinted that the big
old line company is bent on giving
the Faimers elevators at Reserve and
Plentywood a lesson, as these two
companies have been the strongest
competitors of the Occident in this
territory.
nais.
;t
MINNEAPOLIS JAILOR
VISITS PLENTYWOOD
John Bow. who has been a member
of the police force in Minneapolis for
a generation and is now city jailor in
the Mill city, is visiting Mrs. Rose
Gibson at Co me rt own this week. He
is accompanied by Mrs. Bow, who is
a sister of Mrs. Gibson, and Mr. and
Mrs. A. C. Olson and daughter, Lois,
and Mrs. A. W. Funck. Mr. Bow vis
ite-d many old friends in Plentywood;
and reports that he had a very pleas
ant time during his stay.
The Bow party are leaving for
Self ridge, South Dakota, this week,
and will motor from there to Minne
apolis after they visit some friends,
1 TT 1 TYT nunmTf/\r\ t \i
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"New'way"' harve" invention
with which the inventor has been ex
periementing for the past five years.
is being tned out on the farm of Ole
Swenson near here and Is attracting
•tÄ used in the new ma
chine is entirely different from that
used in theregular twine binder. The
machine cuts a swath of twelve feet.
The stalks of grain are elevated into
a revolving bin which through a prin
ciple of centrifugal force draws the
heads inward and causes the stalks to
extend outward. When the bin is full
ÎSiSÂKiÂ
about five feet thigh, apparently solid
and substantial and containing about
the same amount of grain as twenty
shocks. It is claimed that the grain
cures perfectly and that the shocks
may be grouped to permit of early
plowing. The expense of twine and
of shocking* is eliminated, the build
ers believe.
The machine has not been manu
factured on a large scale as yet and
it is said to sell for a thousand dol
lars, but it is said that quantity pro
duction would greatly reduce this
price.
DOHENY APPEALS OIL SUIT
Appeal from the decision of Judge
McCormick in the United States Dis
trict Court at Los Angeles annulling
the oil and gas leases obtained from
former Secretary of the Interior Fall
by the Doheny oil interests has been
filed in the Circuit Court of Appeals
at Los Angeles.
Miss Brownlee of Wolf
Point Is County Princess
Miss Margaret Brownlee of Wclf
Point was chosen princess of Roose
velt county, being winner in a con
test sponsored by the Wolf Point
Herald. As such Miss Brownlee will
go to Helena during the state fair as
the guest of the fair management.
There with the princesses from more
than forty other counties she will
have part in selecting from their
number the Queen of Montana for
1925. The Queen will receive many
additional honors and as the guest of
the American Legion will attend the
National Legion convention at Oma
ha and from there will go by invita
tion to the petroleum exposition at
Tulsa, Okla.
Miss Brownlee is an accomplished
young lady, worthy in every respect
of the honor which her friends have
bestowed on her,— Froid Tribune.
y
ASSESSMENT LIST CORRECTIONS
The following corrections in the as
sessment list as recently published
were given out by County Assessor
Aspland today:
W. D. Dooley's assessment should
read 25 head of horses instead of 10
head of horses, of a total value of
$550.00.
Hans A. Olson, Westby, should read
10 head cf cattle $250.00, instead of
6 head.
Dr. Storkan, library should read
$40.00 instead of $1,000.00.
Buried Treasure' ,
Lands Roosevelt Boys
in Toils of Law
<<
U
(Continued from page one)
put his treasure into another box and
hauled it to a pasture on his father's
farm jus outside Bainville. He re
moved sod in sections, putting it and
the loose dirt on a canvas so it wouid
not become scattered and leave evi
dence of digging. He buried his box
of money and replaced the sod so that
after a shower or two no marks re
mained.
The possession of so much money
filled the boy with the desire to pos
sess some of the things money will
buy. Recently, it is said, he went to
Williston and purchased an old auto
mobile for $70. The boy, with money
to spend, easily attracted companions
and four, three from Bainville and
one from Culbertson, appear to have
become associated with him. They
had ideas of adventure.
The Culbertson boy, according to
reports, helped himself to the use of
a car belonging to his father and the
gang is said to have collected such
articles as a couple of rifles, a .44
revolver in a holster and a guitar.
Two of the boys were brought to
Wolf Point, accompanied by relatives,
and the other two, including the chief
j actor in the story, are expected,
buried riches is true is a matter of
conjecture, even among those who
know the boy and are familiar with
local history at Bainville.
I
Boys Arrested
j Wolf Point, Aug. 17.—Four boys of
Bainville and Culbertson, who came
to the attention of Deputy County
Attorney Foor and Sheriff Anderson,
when their title to certain property
in their possession was questioned,
have been brought befose justice and
j district courts,
brought before District Judge Paul
Thursday, who, after questioning
them, left them in the custody of
their parents and reported the cases
to the state probation officer, who also
is expected to investigate. The other
two boys, Richard Meinhardt and
Russell Poter, did not appear and
! Judge Paul issued warrants for their
arrest. They were brought here Fri
day and arraigned before Justice
Charles Gordon, who bound them over
to the district court on a charge of
burglary. Their hearing is set for
August 27.
Whether or not the story of the
Two of them were
SHERIFF RAIDS OUT
LOOK BOOZE JOINTS
Continued from Page One)
P^elj spied an especially
groomed Goldbncker. -
snenff took after th e fleet-footed
. trough the back door.
Whlle doing so four other goldbrick
er ; s . ran out front door and jump
®d a waiting automobile, stepped
on the gas and drove in a furious
manner > n the direction cf Scobey.
llhe y left several decks of "shade"
'Y 0 ™- card ? several suits of
clothes behind them in Outlook, for
lca they are not likely to return
lor , SCl J™ e tx m e -
; Another stranger, who fell into the
hands of Sheriff Salisbury, seemed
i dazed and stated he could not under
the proceedings. He exclaimed
"Why Bill told me he had it fixed
j with Al." When the sheriff told
b , e could not anything up in
Shenda ? count y a ^ reat light dawned
upon him and he again exclaimed,
1 "Why I never thought I was in Sheri
SsF!* SSS TH "
t b a( i
^üooÄ wïe pre"a Lg to tere
the farraers wh p t p * "
money at the elevators ; T J ejl . '
"2 -as made kn t h , ic
7 T sto™ ta
News ' ' k Producers
' P ,„_ c ,
Th • • t •, . d , , „
are l Y J ed b 1 i svval J an d slivi^
Charley Naw > s y pi Wunderlich a S
Kà don - s Pc<olhallj Jo h n Bould's Place
p roceedings ^ all of the 2ove
fiE be Judge Paul
;
well
The under
Publicity Drives Crop Grab
bers Into Their Holes
(Continued from page one)
eastern sharks have filed no more in
junctions and that no new receivers
are being appointed to harvest farm
ers' crops. The two injunction cases,
which were exposed, have been set
tled. The opinion of Judge Lowe, de
fining the farmer's rights under fore
closure proceedings has been careful
ly read and studied not only by farm
ers but by the lawyers of the county.
To supplement this opinion showing
that a farmer has a right to stay
on his place and harvest his crop
without interference during his year
of redemption period we herewith
give the following extract from the
statutes of Montana as given in the
Revised Codes of 1921. Section 9449
reads as follows:
"Possession of lands during pe
riod of redemption.—The
, mm pur
chaser of lands at mortgage fore
closure or execution sales is not
entitled to the possession thereof
as against the execution debtor
during the period of redemption
allowed by law while said
tion debtor personally occupies
the land as a home for himself
and his family."
The constitutionality of this law,
passed by the legislature of 1921, has
been upheld by the supreme court of
Montana in two decisions handed
down recently. These decisions can
be found in the Montana reports,
numbers 64 page 47, and 67 pages
and 8. This law gives the right of
possession to the farmer against all
comers during the period of redemp
tion which extends one year from the
date of foreclosure sale. He can drive
off anybody who tries to grab his crop
or commit any other anti-social crime
in any way he thinks most effective.
The purchaser is entitled to fair rents
and profits during the period of
demption but there is no law to com
pel the farmer to pay such rents be
fore the period of redemption expires.
The shark has no legal right to grab
the farmer's crop during that period
unless the farmer contrats to do
Not only the farmers are aroused
at the attempts made to grab the
farmers' crop this year. Even the
small business men, who called the
farmers wiho voted for their own can
didates at the polls, bolsheviks and
other pet names, are aroused at the
brazen attempt to take the farmers'
money away by such illegal means.
They realize that if the farmer
robbed that grass will grow green
thç. streets ant the goods will rot on
their shelves. They also are up
arms against the anti-social sharks
who are fattening on the lifeblood
the oppressed.
execu
re
so.
-
"I Don't Want to Co Back
to Scobey/ Cries Girl
(Continued from page one)
condemned by the Helena jurist who
released her. It was also shown th
she was held incommunicado in Sco
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bey and that the political understrap
pers of the Barry and Bill 'Stephens
and Sid Bennett political machine de
nied her the right to consult counsel,
which has been sanctioned by law
since the time of Magna Charta.
It was also shown to the court that
Judge Comer, the old gang judge, had
no jurisdiction, but assumed it any
way.
She was denied trial by jury, a
right that was won after a hard
fought battle by the people of Eng
land from their oppressors, and was
reluctantly conceded by King John on
the plains of Runneymede. All these
rights and privileges, written into
American law, seemed to be unknown
in Scobey when this poor young girl
was committed to institution
, , , . , _ a
direlects for a period extending over
15 months.
When Judge Poorman heard the
whole tale of the treacherous con
spiracy to deprive an innocent young
girl o i her liberty with as little com
punction as was wont to be used by
the freebooters of the Spanisn Main,
he was shocked. He asked question
after question, apparently amazed
that such a thing could have happen
ed in any part of the United States.
The girl's story of diabolical persecu
tion in Scobey was thrilRngly told by
Rose Paradis to the court. As she
unfolded incident after incident of the
drama of her young life even stern
faced court attaches and lawyers
pulled out their handkerchiefs and
wept. When she had finished there
was not a dry eye in the courtroom,
When Judge Poorman granted the
writ of habeas corpus and she was
asked where she intended going, she
passionately remarked: "I won't go
back to Scobey." The terror of the
unbridled reign of intrigue, inspired
newspaper lies, gunmen and other va
where discipline is stricte*r than in a
prison and where she was compelled
to associate with all kinds cf moral
Judge Shocked
6
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In
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Meats That Are Cooked
Ready to Serve
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Every housewife has experienced the undesirable sen
sation which arrives with unexpected company about
meal time and not a thing in the house to serve.
The answer is simple—phone us and we will send, rush,
any of the above ready-to-serve Meats, and you are re
lieved rom further work and
• •
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worry.
For your Picnic Lunch This Hote Weather We Carry
Complete line of Cold Meat.
a
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Hein's Meat & Grocery
LOUIS E. HEIN, Prop.
11
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Phone 31
PLENTYWOOD, MONT.
it
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A
rieties of. criminals in the frontier
town made an indelible impression on
her young mind. She is going to
Canada where she will try to forget
her awful experiences in Scobey.
Big Battle to Take Place
in Outlook, Sat. Aug. 29
Continued from Page One)
the game from A to Z.
Battling Garner needs no introduc
tion to the fight fans as he has prov
en himself worthy of the confidence
which the boxing enthusiasts of
Northeastern Montana have placed in
this fast coming boxer. Bill has al
ways given the best he had in every
exhibition held in Plentywood and
other towns in the county and no
up name
bout.
Both fighters will weigh 140 pounds
and the bout will go 10 rounds pro
viding a sleep producer is not slipped
over before the finish.
The battle will be youth, vigor and
' aggressiveness against age, experi- j
ence and ring generalship and will j
probably be the hardest fight in which I
Gamer has yet taken part. Scobey 1
will be down en masse to Outlook to !
boost for Blivens, who has been mak
ing his ihome at that city for some I
time and the Sheridan county fight
fans can be depended upon to back
"Bill'' to the limit, as the fighting
Outlook boy has won the respect of
all by his skill and aggressiveness
and ability to take punishment,
* Bc.th battlers are training hard for
the coming match and spectators
who have seen the men in their
work outs, claim that they will be in
the pink of condition on Saturday
night, August 29th. They also claim
that the fans who thought that Gar
ner was good before should now
see him with his new punches which
he has been perfecting under the
supervision of his manager, Mr.
Wunderlich and several trainers,
Among the followers of the boxing
game in Plentywood, opinion varies
as to the outcome or the match.
Many think that Blivens might win
on points and others are firm in their
belief that Garner will wear the
North Dakota veteran down before
the ten rounds are finished by his
hammering tactics in the clinches.
Anyway the battle should be a
real one and a large crowd cf fans
will motor over from this city to
witness the struggle.
The boxing match is being held un
der the auspices of the American
Legion which promises a good semi
final of 6 rounds which will be a
bear cat.
Th e bout commences at 9:00 o-'
clock p. m., and F. E. Lindsey, prom
inent oil man of this city, will referee
the match.
iiiQiiiaiiiamainsniGiii
fill
Farm Land
For Sale or Lease
i
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6
SHERIDAN COUNTY, MONTANA, IS THE OWNER OF THE
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS AND WISH TO SF.IJ.
OR LEASE THE SAME:
3
£.
DANIELS COUNTY:
EVi» Sec. 10, Twp. 35, R. 48.
ROOSEVELT COUNTY:
SE 1 /^, Sec. 5, Twp. 29, R. 52.
E y 2 , Sec. 35, Twp. 30, R. 52.
W y 2 , Sec. 16, Twp. 29, R. 52.
1
SHERIDAN COUNTY:
sy 2 sw*/ 4 , nw»/ 4 swy 4 , sec. 25 .
se»/ 4 se%,
S.
E
Sec. 26, Twp. 36, R. 52.
SW% SE>/ 4 , Sec. 24,
NWy 4 NE«/ 4 , N>/ 2 Nwy 4 , Sec. 25, Twp. 35. R. 55.
se»/ 4 , sy 2 swy 4 , •
nw >/ 4 swy 4 , swy 4 Nwy 4 , s*c. 17, Twp. se, r. 55.
sEy 4 ,
Sec. 22, Twp. 36, R. 56.
ol
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Anyone interested in buying or leasing any of the above describ
ed lands, please communicate with the Board of County Commission
ers or the undersigned.
o
ID
D
D
D
iD
D
Niels Madsen
County Clerk
ID
D
ID
D
PLENTYWOOD
MONTANA
D
D
D
ID
Keeper of Famous Resort, Known as ''Bucket of Blood .
Director of Republican Politics in Daniels County jjJ
Whom Nyquest and Lawrence Bow the Knee, to Face Fed
eral Judge and Jury — Eight Other Dive Keepers to tf
Tried.
»»
and
ore
Great Falls, Aug. 20.— Returns have been made i n t i
United States District Court here on seven information
charging nine men with serious violations of' the Feder 1
liquor laws. All the defendants are at present out 0n y
They are to be arraigned here on the first day of J U( j
jsj Prays' term of court in September.
-
8e C.
The cases attracting most atten-*
tion here are the ones against Barry
Stephens, who achieved considerable
notoriety in this city by reason ot
the publicity given to his exploits
this summer, by Town To P lc ^v "J®
local labor paper. Stephens is knowm
here as the republican boss of Daniels
county. He is known to wield des
potic political power in Scobey. When
thé Federal authorities raided his
famous resort, which is known as the
"Bucket of Blood" in prohibition en
forcement circles, they found a layout
such as they had not come in contact
with for some time is is stated.
On account of the widespread pub
licity given to the exploits of the
famous Scobey saloonkeeper-politi
cian, the court house is sur e to be
filled when his cases come up.
The defendants and the charges
against them are as follows:
Berry Stephens and Harold Dudley,
selling whisky at a resort known as
Berry's place in Scobey May 6 and
May 27.
Berry Stephens, Harold Dudley and
Floyd A. Sunderhauf, selling whisky
at Berry's place. Sunderhauf is al
leged to (have been a bartender for
Stephens and Dudley.
Tony Peritz, selling whisky at
Roundup July 2 and 3.
Mike Rakovich, selling whisky and
beer at Roundup June 20 to 21.
Archie Rawley and Howard Pool,
selling whisky on a homestead 41
miles northeast of Havre July 10.
Otto Aageson, possession of liquor
four miles west of Fairchild, Hill
county, July 11.
Charles Sloan, transportation and
possession of whisky at Lewistown
June 27.
BRYAN SOLD TONGUE
TO REAL ESTATERS
FOR $100 PER DAY
New York. — William Jennings
Bryan made over $250,000 in the
last few months of his life, be
lieves E. L. Lambright of Tampa,
Fla., who headed the democratic
convention delegation from Flor
ida last year. Bryan was reput
ed worth a million last spring
but wrote Lambright then that
his fortune was less than half
that amount. His estate is
shown to be $860,000.
Lambright believes Bryan
made most of this in Florida real
estate and states that Bryan used
his "silver tongue" at $100 a day
for Coral Gables, Florida, a real
estate venture. Bryan sold his
home Villa Serena for $200,000
profit.
The next state eraminati™ •
-, , . , nallon l
^phy, hygiene and all eighth
subjects will be held in the
gr ade building of the public ,
Aug. 27-28. The schedule for i\ 1
da y is; 9 o'clock, civics- io-is '
c ess; 10:30 history; 12, intermit'/*'
i;30, grammar; 3, recess; 315
ing; 4:15, close. For Friday- 9 ' ^
metic; 11, recess; 11:15, spelling- p
intermission; 1:30, physiology 8 ' an j
agriculture; 2:30, geography; 4 , do*
,
Eighth Grade Exams to Be
Held Here August 27-2g
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It is easy enough to make
extravagant claims of
feet service—but quite
other thing to deliver the
goods—day in and day out.
per
an
We ae not talking through
our hat when we tell
that our barbering and bob
bing service is the best to be
had in northeastern Montana.
you
To the women of Sheridan
county we extend a special
invitation to try cur shop—
for bobs—marcelling—sham
poos—and curling.
The White Barber
Shop
L. MOE, Prop.
Plentywood, Montana

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