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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, June 04, 1926, Image 1

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
THE PRODUCERS
NEWS GOES INTO
EVERY HOME IN
THE COUNTY.
liberty
is N ()T
gjlSDED
I l>()WN
above
FROM
A PAPER OF THE PEOPLE. FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE
Plentywood, Montana, Friday, June 4, 1926
Official Newspaper of Sheridan County
Weekly
hi
C,,k Rat#»«** Foreign. $3.76 per year
DUD. I\aies. [n u s > $3.oo per year
Entered as Second Class Matter, October 18, 1912. at the Post
office at Plentywood, Montana, Under the Act of March 3. 1870.
IN THE
a
hi pj. Wallace
* r J d pertinent
'ft Ctèat and Small
Concern.
^.r-nc w ere very excited last
l * î ÏÏfâ* Farmer-Labor Party
** 'Vitiate a Bank Depositors
rW^uw Wh«. a law
^^ated 0« tfae fioor of the
or *^ o ftUS e of representatives
B ÏÏSon, a lackey of the
k - hirkfi named Fitzgerald of
<V h rountv eot up and made a
1 in? that such a law was
Nebraska,
« Robert
statimr
in other states.
'rfWiar was held U P as a - stat !
** J law for the protection of
in hanks was a failure.
£ Larson showed this çonten
i^, false and that while the
*_]. 0 f Montana had lost over
in closed hanks in four
•ft* depositors of Nebraska
JLjoat one cent. Simple-mmd
''«nresentatives from farming
LJ took the word of the Ra
f Kopist for the money sharks
l Lference to the statements of
L^imar man with the result
r, Ik« hill was defeated and the
of the state were left without
„Ktiw against soft-handed ban
JVraling from behind bank
•gxr.
A S,,ine letter addressed by
I Arctan «f tho Department of
man^wo m^nthTago
and
* »me into our P '
Ä 5 S
|S*k»ska, who had their money
trrfl^Vou depositors who en
LÎL rJevTo Ihe care "f
Sheridan Countv Hankers should
Ldf follow ing letter and then
«h-her it is more con
interests to put hank j
in office in Helena, or |
else, or men of the type 1
|3ert Larson.
b bkinp over the records of the
pber-of tho legislature from
ii*\ count), «here a grand jury is
» proton e responsibility for the
irr of four banks last winter,
IU they voted against the Bank
■rittee La«. Ihe widows and
gbfls of that county w ho lost
in-dungs in the Glasgow banks
U that their interests would
lirtter served by sending repre
Lutiw* to the State ho«nital who
w vote for the program of the
»«■Labor party in preference
Ifc interests of the bankers.
■ft W your
1«rs
h*Inter referred to is as follows:
STATE OF NEBRASKA
I
N
Wr Ut. r nf \nril fnv
r Adam McMullen has ien re
to this Department for reply.
Ik Guarantee law in Nebraska
«Bin force and effect. All de
««in hanks which have gone
»wmership have been paid in
Uk people of Nebraska seem
^Mrnnfidence in the banking
"«»ns- which we think has
hi»»«! upon the fact that de
F« instate hanks suffered no
P treason of hank failures,
mav^hM^h*; Say t iT hat
EÂtïTÏVS
I» average daily deposits in
r«ts. should, it seems, be able
b.-j!Ä-Ä3
maturity date which has
► nceeded one year. At the
"^ccrhfi" ^ Uaran t te t e c" d
1î£Â;Â
I Lntoln, Neb., April 15th, 1926.
k.Aidrew Trovaton,
llrf River Falls, Slinn.
!iS**g* ^"'tosses
1
BÎS hl ? COntam,ng
Very t™iyy 0 uri'
""Tirk ÎSr^T erCe '
GRIGGS. Secretary.
Ä n 8 * KELSON,
Herald.
r *Puhiican
of the
official organ
nv £l . . P ar D' in Sheridan
*«ion * *Tl that lhere is con
fiai n , ran k- s of tho Coun
C* T a ■ ar mer Labor Coun
1 noT 1 1 raWS niKh ' Whi, . e
k^ m «ntal "(rule* present
. he intimates that the
**** them, metaphoric
h ni com d p t .
! ,h * termers dele*
in the Temnle We
* Ä should the Council of
^T lde to call a county con
•rta h!, the . de,e R a tes from the
0 f* Power to select
I» »ui 5 * nd >dates they please,
W..J no ba nkers or other
> to ^ the hig interests
le .the choice of such a
18 that Wi -, we Predict that
"* cal,ed « has finish
^ »tirw a . tl0n * il will have
u e l, et wh »ri\ will give the
[^»Kich k an . admin 'ttration as
Lh«t twn in Power for
h ** 4>ubt V ars ' Mr - Nelson
to r\i to pick K°°d men
rj* Sit he f f 0 republican
O it w25 to take into ac
to been W ®H nigh im
kî^R 800,1 ««der
V rat *i by rtî'r °î. the par
^^•llon Foohdge amt
on Page Five)
Mm
FRENCH WAR DEBT IS RATIFIED BY HOUSE
I* i* *1* v *5* 'Î* v i 1 ( J' *î* F "J* %
-J. A A. > t AA A A ii
r TVWWW V WT
, .j. .J..;*,;. »>♦;
Scopes Case Before Tennessee Supreme Court
EVOLUTION LAW WILL
BE JUDICIALLY DECIDED
Famous Lawyer's Eloquence Flames; 'There's a Sword Tied
to the Cross !" He Cries—Case in Hands of Supreme
Court of Tennessee—Says to Court "You Cannot Put
D |. , n . . 117M | u i_i j j
Blinders on the World —Decision Will Be Handed
Down Next Fall.
p-p a —pr' p a niTrti m i -ii —p j I p
MAIL CAPHUL, Nashville, ienn., June I.—Lon
stitutionality of America s first evolution case rested this after
noon in the hands of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, after
arguments were closed in a special hearing on the appeal of
J 0 h n Thomas Scopes to set aside his conviction for teaching
modern science to a Dayton high school class.
Will Take Case Under Advisement *
- 3 - ..'f-Ä I
take thg ca?e um{er advisement. i
A decision will not be handed down
until next. Fall, Chief Justice Grafton
Green said, because the court will
meet next Saturday to take its Sum- •
mer recess.
The two-day hearing upon the ap- i
peal came to a close with an irnpas
sioned plea from Clarence Darrow
[that intellectual freedom be protect
led n ithe courts against religious
tyranny, oppression and intolerance.
Goad to Darrow.
There was no William Jennings
Brvan to contrast Darrow, but there,
; was k t. McConnico, a "silver-!
tongued" Tennessean, who eloquently
defended the law.
-, \ rrir ,
goÄÄÄÄ
th ^ r operation.
To direct teaching in a specified
fashion was not interfering with any
one's liberty to think or with any
one's religious freedom. The law
merely warned off attacks upon all
i religion, he said.
This was a goad to Darrow. He
roared into action, with the dynamic
fervor that characterized him when
he shouted his defiance in Dayton to
the narrow creed of the fundamental
istc
We have been told that to teach 1
(evolution will lead to anarchy and
edition," Darrow began.
/"Theodore Roosevelt, William How
ârd Taft and Woodrow Wilson were
not anarchists. They were scholars,
They were not ashamed of know
ledge. They did not boast of ignor
ance, nor plead the virtue of mtoler-i
ance over education. They heheveâ
in evolution as a science."
Darrow Grown Old.
The American "Voltaire," as he is
known to his friends, picked up the
°L battle Wh m e ^ *1°^ J 4
(Continued on Last Page,
__________ ____ _ Ä _____ _ _ _ .
MYSTERY SURROUNDS DEATH
OF BOY MURDERER'S FATHER
j -
Martin Schlabsz Met Death Mysteriously Shortly Before
Ferdinand Left for Montana, Says Fargo Pap^r-Ashley .
N - D - People Spe culate .mPedre. of Boy Kdler.
Did Ferdinand Schlabsz. the mild youth, who is now incar
i-rated in the Wolf Point jail charged with the murder of Mr.
and Mrs * Ton y Geisler, kill his own father? This is the Ques
tion that is agitating Ashley, North Dakota, the home of young
Schlabsz, who moved to Montana shortly after the mysterious
j h f Martin Schlabsz, his parent.
As word of the murder at
as wora oi me murae
! smith of Homestead, Is read to new
! crowds in the district, the death of
the parent of the young slayer is
recalled. Some think the methodical,
way the boy cleaned up the Geisler
' place after the killing and the cool
ness he displayed in driving 20 miles
towards the Big Muddy, .with the.
bodies of his victims/hugging with a
dull > thudding sound behind him m
the car, denoted a callousness to
death strange in one so young or nn
accustomed to crime. Others at
tribute the reason for the act oi tne
young man te a periodic m ? an ® d ®7
?ir e to kill which was brought on at
the time of the murder of the ueis
le rs by a compelling desire to pos
sess the dead people's sedan, so tnat
be co«ld take out his girl, ine foi
lowing dispatch published m the J?w
1?° Forum throws new light on tne
case Schlabsz:
I -
'"ALLEGED MONTANA
MURDERER WAS BORN
NEAR ASHLEA. N. D.
-
Ferdinand Schlabsz, 18, who
(Continued on Page Eight)
iSSâbk ^ Â"of à. ffi
death of his father deepened. Much
aroXfÀshJey^ncl 1 ^VfSyed c^y
i of the Producers News, contammg
; the account of the horrible murder
GOVERNMENT BUYS
_ _
14 ÄHTOMORII FS
14 HU 1 UlUUDlLLO
j»t HI rAFrUHIAAFV
IN PLKN 1 Y WOOD
^ 1 1 M
Peterson Company Delivers Large
Fleet of Chovrolets to Immigration'
Department for Patrol Work
Along Border—Inspector Hampton
Concludes Deal With Local Auto-'
mobile Concern on Behalf of U. S.
Government.
What is considered the biggest au
tomobile transaction ever entered in
to by the United States Government
in Montana, took place in Plenty
Ä - - - Peterson
'The cars will be delivered to the
emigration service this week for pa-;
^ ro | work along the border from
Flavre to Portal. The cars bought
are ad 1926 touring automobiles. The
government after consideration con-|
eluded that what they needed for pa
trol purposes was a light, economical
car which could develop a high speed
when giving chase to booze runners,
and decided that the Chevrolet would (
be most suitable for the purpose in
hand 1
Inspector Hampton of the Immi
gration service was in Plentywood I
yesterday ^dcon^leted the transact
turn with the Peterson Company, who |
have sold more cars of this make (
durmg the past summer mine ^
territory wan any^other Uie\ro
dealer in 1 1the Northwest.
Since the Emigration departme
™ T> 'the^CaMdiä bor
booze running on me uu .
mimber^and^activity among the in
wh-v. the'delivery of the
! rmrehased i^ Plenty
i wool there wiU be increased Tctivity
^
--—
Biem*-
-
w u Known Farmer Dies Wednes
Carl Oberg, well known farmer of
the Outlook-Raymond country died
■ Wednesday mo ming at the Outlook
Hospita i as a result of injuries sus
ta ^ ned j n an automobile accident at
p i ace , three miles north of
late Saturday night. pie
deceased was returning home when
his car left the grade at the place
mentioned and turned over twice.
the injured man was picked up
. t wftg f ound that he was suffering
from a f rac tured skull and severe in
j uries a b 0 ut the head and body. He
wag at oncc t© the Outlook Hos
w bere he was under the care of
j) r Fawcett, who did all that medical
science could accomplish to preserve
the life of the injured man.
Carl oberg was one of the old
time set tl e rs of Sheridan County. He
was widely known and respected and
b i s loss came as a severe shock
his wide circle of friends.
T A RL OBERG KILLED
VfilVLi UULiIlU lY ILLL l/
IBJ AI1T0 ACCIDENT
Ill rtU i v rtUUll/Lll i
day Morning at Outlook Hospital
of Injuries Sustained in Auto Spill.
JO LICENSED TO WED—
4 DIVORCED IN WEEK
Wolf Point, May 31,—Marriage li
censes were issues here during the
last week to Jacob Brese and Katie
Kaufman, both of Culbertson; Cecil
Richard Curtis of Sand Creek and
Belle Kao of Bainville; Abner Rob
ert Todd and Evangeline-Shoots-the
Deer, both of Frazer; Albert Kennedy
£ B™* 4 »" " d "£*?> B,0 . u " 4 ° f
Wolf Point; Harry Redboy of Brock
| ton and Lelia Neck iac e 0 f Drew.
Edith McLaughlin was granted a di
i vorce from Harvey McLaughlin and
I the custody of their two children.
|Dora Miller was granted a divorce
from Elmer Miller.
I-
I t I/ .] 1\ A T71 •/ D _
j rr £Stby~lyIctl*lTOy k^OUTICIl l*TO^T£S~
j . 77 y D*
i CITTYIC'TS 1 0 1 lClt)G icC/HC
At Crystal Lake June
,
1
j
i
j
1
The thriving Westby-McElroy
Council of the Progressive Far
mers of Montana will hold a
picnic at Crystal Lake, south of
Westby, Sunday, June 13th. A
big time is planned and every
body is invited to attend and es
pecially the members of the oth
er Councils of Northeastern Mon
tana and Northwestern North
Dakota. There will be a speak
ing program, baseball game and
other sports and a picnic din
ner. Everybody is asked to bring
something for the picnic dinner.
Tho Westby-McElroy Council
of the Western Progressive Far
mers is the first Council to ar
range for a picnic.
Councils will also
The other
give picnics
SCOBEY HERE
JUNE 5 AND 6
Will Have New Pitcher Who Is o
to Be Equal of Risberg—Daniels
County Seat Determined to Hold
Championship ot rsortheaser
feTgu^ f^r Players ^oT Saturday
Garnît
and Sunday Games.
-
Saturday and Sunday after
1 . 00 s L ar p the fans of
as te r n Montana will have an
opportunity to witness two games be
. " f f a ctest ball clubs in
this part of the state and probably of
the whole state, when Scobey and
Plentywood will fight it out on the
local diamond just before the big
SÄTÄ
had trimmed that Canadian team,
faT . s believe that Plenty
ISSkss
^ ^frSvwood
Money isTic?object to Scobey with
! Thi^îT N^rthasteln Montra affte
1 Pf |ent t™ and
: 'Ä"?
me ^ U ^ s wiI1 cost the Scobey
&& Z
gee game y s here that will rival the
big games of the east in hitting,
£t v n ^ ood n 'have a ^reputation over
the whole northwest in the baseball
world, and that reputaüon wül be
up h el d the coming season if mdica
tions that are strong now turn out
to be true. v , J
Every baseball fan will be on hand
Saturday and Sunday to see Plenty
wood humble Scobey if they can, and
on the other hand, Scobey will be
down enmasse to support their aggre
gation which will be changed consid
erable after the games last Saturday
and Sunday.
Manager Felsch is said to have
made the remark that he wanted to
see what Plentywood had, and now
that he knew he would go them one
better, and in the meantime Plenty
wood is all set, and licking their lips
as though tasting again the fruits of
another victory over the much vaunt
ed Scobey champions.
Tonight (Thursday) as the Pro
ducers News goes to press, people
a re gathering for the Stampede
j which gives its first performance to
day (Friday).
Every street corner has its stand
ready for business and the city is full
of Indians, cowboys, cowprls and the
bad, bellering bulls can be heard in
the distance.
LARGE CROWD GATH
ERING FOR STAMPEDE
Camp Fire Girls Reorga
nize Under Miss Young
The Onandaga Lodge of the Camp
fire Girls have reorganized their
group and have applied to be read
mitted to the National Association,
membership in which they lost when
they discontinued their dues after
the departure of their former guar
dian, Mrs. Oscar Gullickson, from
Plentywood. Miss Alice Young is
their new guardian. The Onandagas
hope to go on a real camping trip and
put o na Campfire play, showing the
spirit, the work and the symbolism
of he Campfire organizaion this sum
mer. All girls between the ages of
eleven and eighteen inclusive are
eligible and are invited to join.
j
during the summer.
It is planned on making this
picnic an event to be remembered.
A committee is now on the job
arranging the details,
will be something doing all of
the time.
Sen. Charles E. Taylor and
Editor P. J. Wallace of tho Pro
ducers News and others will
speak on topics of the day, and
the plans and purposes of the
Progressive Farmers.
The farmers of the Northeast
ern corner of the county are
planning on attending en masse.
Crystal Lake, the place where
the picnic will be held is a very
pretty lake six or seven miles
south of Westby.
:
!
There
STATE FAIR WIU OP
EN AT HELENA SEPT. 6
Helena.-The State Fair Grounds
were leased to the Fair Association
^ Lewis and Clark county by the
State Board of Examiners last week.
The Fair will be financed and direct
ed by the Association since the last
session of the Legislature failed to
make any appropriation for State
Fair purposes.
Labor Day September 6 , the enter
tainment will open and it will close
September 11. An extensive pro
gram of herse racing wih be 1 a f^
in the track events.
From iny'lines . ■
SH®
county, won several exhibitions at
the international grain show in Chi
^gaUty^f co^parn^rship rat
Grounds are Leased to Lewis and
Clark Fair Association — Agree
ment Provides There Must Be No
Violation of Gambling Laws.
already received,*
^
leïïbfïdîïïe th^fair
ating a "7 J h ^ o a ^ ta :^ a b d Till not
of the Sta^ .f commonly a s,
race-track gambling on er mit
grounds ™XÄdLes or
recorcfing or
any other device lor ^
registermg any oeL of * speed 0 r
4 tf„ r6S 'LdLZce ol any anhual or
skill or endurance of y
beast. ____
t iTArAnTf DP
DI ANflPlIK I T Kf
[ VU 1 Li I«*-*
_ t . n trr rpr'IlfirtT P
fFT AI \ AI | HVIrl K
1 x&LaJ fil 1 1 iBj
' , Kath p r ine
Mrs. N. P- Ostby s and Katnenne
Matron's Classes Give Kecuais io
Large Audiences wiucb
Greatly Enjoyed^
-" . M _ c K p
The pianoforte pupils of Mrs. r*. j.
Ostby, appeared jn a pubhc recital
at the Farmer-Labor Temple Sunday
evening before a large and PP
ative audience. The pupils perform*
ed in a way that was a credrt
their teacher and tiiemsenres, and
demonstrated that there is a
musical talent in Plentywood, an 1 a
number of future musicians, of whom
Plentywood in the course of ti
will come to be very Pr° u -
The stage was very beautifully ar
ranged and made a Jj"® S? ng There
the pretty young Perfo™ 6 ^' ^h®
were twenty-four
citai and it would be hard and rnaybe
improper to try to say ,JjJj lch .
the best, tho perhaps little ]ean Ost
(Continued on page 5)
CONGRESSMEN VOTE FOR
BILL BY BIG MAJORITY
j
Opposition Held Agreement Too Lenient for Debtor—Fund
ing Plan Makes Total Principal, Interest, $6,847,674,000
—France Given 62 Years to Settle.
WALL STREET TO PASS BILL IN SENATE
Washington, June 2.—The French war debt settlement
was approved today by the house. The vote was 236 to 111.
The agreement, providing for funding of the debt of $6,847,
674,000 in principal and interest over a 62-year period, now
goes to the senate, where stiff opposition is expected.
«»*«*«, **a
- *
Plays "Swede and the Merry *
Widow.
The Kent Stock Company, with *
* an entire new personnel of actors *
* from the east, will appear at the *
* Farmer-Labor Temple tonight, in *
* a howling farce comedy, "The ♦
! S * ede a - nd the , Merry Widow " *
•* The Kent actors were adver- *
* Used last week to appear on the *,
* opening night in the famous
* drama, The Unwanted Child,
* b . ut becau se of delays in the ar
" val , of som ® ® f . tbo ^f n ® ry ' *
*this play was delayed u"tü Fn- #
day, June 18th, when it will be *
* P a 2 r e i? S o re Jj __ i Morrv *
„ 7 J he „ S . wed ® J and . tbe M ® rry
* "» a,d A Si a 8 iSwnî®
Ole Olson and John Johnson
* —a side-splitting scream that is
making a hit wherever it is
shown.
*
TEMPLE TONIGHT
*
*
*
Automobile Accident Sends
Outlook Folks to Hospital
A serious auto accident occurred
Outlook when a car driven by
near
Frank Keogh crashed into a bridge
two miles north of town Saturday
night as the party was returning
from a dance at Kowski's. Besides
Mr. Keogh, three others were in the
car which went over the bridge. The
occupants of the machine received
several bruises and some scratches in
the crash but fortunately none were
seriously injured. They were taken
to the Outlook hospital by a passing
car shortly after the accident. Late
Thursdav evening an inquiry by the,
Producers News at the Outlook hos
pital disclosed the fact that the in
jured people are progressing favor
ably and will soon be around again,
PLENTYWOOD TO MEET FAST TEAM
FROM WEST IN 3 GAMES NEXT WEEK
Former Shelby Drillers, Now Known as Havre Drillers Will
Play Three Games at Plentywood, Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday, June 7-8-9—Jim Thorpe, Famous Ath
lete, Will Be Here.
When Baskets West Then comes
fast Havre Hillers of Havre, will
meet the Plentywood team on the lo
^lÆ^aîre team right at this time
is leading the Western League of
this state, composed of Great Falls,
Bu tte, Helena and other big towns
of western Montana. The team is
mostly composed of players from the
Coagt League> who have bee n farmed
out, with a sprinkling of former maj
or le ague players,
Jim Thorpe Will Be Here,
Nearly every lover of sports has
heard of Jim Thorpe, the great In
dian athlete, who was proclaimed
champion all-around athlete of the
world a short time ago, and who is
proclaimed by sport writers to be the
greatest ath ] ete that ever lived. He
fa nQW p i ayinp: on the Havre team,
having just recently come from the
major leagues.
Then there is Harry Harper, a
outfielder j ust released from the
National Le agU e.
games should be great sport
f or every lover of good baseball and
for those who w j s h to see star play
erg in act j on . The fans were able
^ gee lagfc Sunday w hat the Plenty
wood fence busters can do when they
^ presse< i, and it would make every
^ this neck of the woods happy
^ see pj^tywood the home of the
champion baseball team of the State
Qf which is a possibility.
People from everj' section of east
em Montana and Dakota and Sas
katchewan> Canada will be here to
^ the struggle between Eastern
and Western Montana for the cham
"" u
pionship of the State.
Its approval came after a day and
half of debate during which it was
assailed as "too lenient" and "un
fair to American taxpayers," by a
group of members, principally Demo
crats.
Representatives Collier of Missis-
sippi and Rainey of Illinois, both De
moc rats, led the opposition and those
"defending the settlement included
Chairman Green of the committee,
and Representatives Burton, Repub
Rcan, Ohio, and Crisp, Democrat,
Georgia, the latter two members of
the American debt commission.
Wall Street Senators Will Vote
Ratification
The House of Morgan will back
the Pettlernent of the French debt
and Wall street Senators will urge
that unless the bill is passe d that
Bolshevism will raise its head in the
land of Ijafaye tte. The falling price
Q f the franc will be pointed out as
additional reason why the debt should
be settled. As the French are re
garded as the cleverest and most rev
dutionary people in Europe, an up
heavtll wh i c h will shake Europe to
j f ounda tions, is expected by the
j International bankers. This, coupled
, with the desire of the House of Mor
to extend the Dawes plan over
g an
France is given here as a reason why
all the Senators who listen to their
; master's voice in Wall Street will
vote for the ratification of the set
j tlement.
LOCAL MARKETS
Wheat, Dark Northern .
^ ber p ^ u ^ m
; Rye ' per bu.
| Flour, per cwt.
' Butter, per pound
Eggs, per dozen ..
rvrwnnn t to ^POREY
(PLENTYWOOD LOSES TO SCOBEY
\ As the Producers News goes to
| press the report comes that the Plen
; tywood team lost to Scobey by a
score of 12 to 1 in the Regina, Cana
! da, tournament. This should bnght
; en up the Scobey fans, who have been
! down in the mouth since Saturday
jand Sundays games.
.$1.34
1.12
1.91
.50
. 4.50
. .35
.20
COUNCIL OF ACTION
TO MEET AT P'WOOD
The Council of Action of the
Sheridan County Progressive
Farmers will hold a meeting in
Plentywood next Monday after
* noon for tho transaction of im
* portant business.
* Monday night the Plentywood
* Council of the Progressive Farm
* ers will entertain members of
* the Council of Action and visit
» ors from all over Sheridan and
* Daniels County. Membors of
* the Peerless and Scobey Councils
* will start from Daniels county
* early in the afternoon to be pree
* ent at the meeting Monday night
* at the Farmer-Labor Temple.
* Members of the local councils
* all over Sheridan county are ex
* pected to be present and will be
* welcomed and entertained by
* Council No. 1.
DR. STEELE MOVES
FROM HOSPITAL
Dr. Steele moved his office from
the Plentywood Memorial Hospital
last week and is now located in new
quarters back of the Riba State
Bank. It is understood that there
was considerable disagreement among
members of the medical profession
practicing at the Hospital which re
sulted in Dr. Steele informing the
Board of control that he would move
his office to some other part of town.

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