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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 27, 1927, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1927-05-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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Three Great Falls attorneys will
leave for San Francisco on the mom- i
ing train, each going to appear be
fore the United States circuit court
of appeals there on legal decisions
out of the Great Falls federal court.
W. F. O'Leary and J. W. Freeman,
the first representing the defendant
and the second the plaintiff in the
action of W. C. Blomquist as receiver
of the State Bank of Belt against the
American Surety company, leave to- |
morrow. Blomquist sued the surety
company for $10,000 in the federal
court in Great Falls before Judge G.
N. Pray, the court deciding in favor |
of the defendant company. . Blom
quist appealed from the decision.
Loy J. Molumby is the third attor
ney to go tomorrow morning also
going on an appeal in a federal insur
matter on behalf of an ex-ser
NATIONAL SURETY
COMPANY FAILS
TO PAY $10,000
ance
The National Surety Company is
the. Insurance Co that is delaying
paying the claim it owes Sheridan
County. People familiar with this :
company state that it resorts to ev- 1
ery quibble in the law before paying
claims.
COUNTY FUNDS
□nnCTCn fco yny DY
tJLMJb 1 W JbOj/yj ö l
AUTO LICENSE CHECK
_
*♦**•***♦♦
* A check of $3,707.30 is being *
* sent to the Sheridan County *
* treasurer this week as the pro- *
* ceeds of the collection of automo- *
* bile licenses thus far this year. *
* This is the Northeastermost conn- *
* ty's share, of the total collected *
* in the State. *
* County road funds will be *
* boosted by $131,355.90 this month *
* as the result of automobile li- *
* cense collections during April. *
* The months' receints have been *
* certified by Warden Austin B. *
* Middleton as register of the Mot- *
* or Vehicle bureau, to State Audi- *
* tor Porter for distribution in am- *
* mints based on and approximat- *
* ing the receipts from each coun- *
* ty. *
* Silver Bow gets a little more *
* than $9.000; Yellowstone, $8,100; *
* Cascade, $5,500; Lewis and Clark, *
* $5,200; Flathead, $5,000; Valley,
* $4,900; Hill, $4,400; Carbon, $4,
* 200; Fergus, $3,700; Missoula,
Galla
The picnic, which was to have been
held by the McElroy Council of the
Progressive Farmers on June 18th,
has been changed to be held on Sat
* $3,300; Gallatin, $3,200;
* tin, $3.200; Custer, $2,300; Park,
$1,900;
* Roosevelt, $3,787.20; Daniels $2,
* 929.05.
* $2,100; Deer Lodge,
**********
McElroy Prog. Farmers
Picnic, Saturday, June 11
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In every item listed in this business getter is a message which tells you of the tremendous saving you are go
ing to make under our new plan to
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This plan is the new scientific merchandising method which sooner or later will be the only method used in retailing or wholesaling merchandise. We are accepting this plan now before we are forced
to and because it is coming into public favor more and more every day. Read these items over, you will profit by trading
at this store exclusively.
88c
Regular $ 1.00 Crackers .
Regular 30c Crackers.
Campbells Soups, always sold for 1 3c.
S. O. Corn, per can.
S. O. Tomatoes .
S. O. Tomatoes, large.
Quart Aunt Dinah Molasses.
4 lbs. Market Day Spec. Raisins.
Armours Milk.
Carnation Milk .
8 lbs. Lard
4 lbs. Lard
2 lbs. Lard
$1.68
P. G. Soap, 24 bars.
1 lb. Calumet Baking Powder .
Fine Quality 5 String Brooms.
Hooker Lye, 3 cans for..
Prunes, 2 lbs.
24 Bars Electric Spark Soap ..
$1.00
Peanuts, per lb.
Van Camp Med. Pork & Beans, 3 for.
Bordens Eagle Brand Milk.
Mothers Oats with China, per package
Home Brand Pure Fruit jams, 3 lbs.
Dark Syrup, 5 lb. pail.
Dark Syrup, 10 lb. pail.
White Syrup, 5 lb. pail.
White Syrup, 1 0 lb. pail .
19c
46c
88c
34c
28c
,X
11c
48c
49c
26c
14c
Malt Syrup..
Home Brand Sliced Peaches..
Home Brand Sliced Apricots ...
Home Brand Sliced Pinneapolies
Swan Matches, per carton.
Bulk Coffee, per lb.
64c
...25c
42c
16c
39c
25c
$1.33
21 c
i
38c
89c
34c
32c
43c
38c
Steel Cut Oats, 3 lbs.
Fancy and plain cookies, per lb.
45c
65c
M.
lie
24c
21c
41c
£1
12c
38c
50 lb. Block Salt, while they last
85c
76c
These are only a few grocery specials, everything is marked down to Rock Bottom in keeping with our new BUY FOR CASH ONLY policy. When buying for cash you are entitled to a better
price and all of our customers will be treated alike—the same service, quality and price—as all our customers will be CASH CUSTOMERS. All our merchandise will be marked right down to Rock Bot
tom and the same price will apply to ALL CUSTOMERS.
Our entire shoe stock is marked down to a frac
tion above Wholesale Price. You will
many dollars on the purchase of one or two
pairs.
VN
This is the only fair and legitimate way of doing business.

Men's Summer Union Suits, very high
quality .
Mens' Mercerized Dress Sox, per pair.
No. 4510 Men's Canvas Gloves, good
weight, 2 pairs for.
U-7
Dozens and dozens of other splendid values
are now to be had at our store and as we get
rking smoothly
Men's heavy work sox, 2 pairs for.
Men's Work Shirts, used to sell for $1.25,
from now on .
26c
JS
r?
98c
save
27c
our new Cash Only plan
some of our bargains will simply astound, you.
wo
86c
-x
25c
g
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-
Commencing June 1, 1927, and subject to changes in the market, we will sell:
$1.00
$1.98
$7.95
$1.08
$2.10
$4.00
s
j;; 1
*
1 lbs. Sugar for
|
*
-X
23 lbs. Sugar for.
100 lbs. Sugar for ....
23 lbs. S. W. Flour .
30 lbs. Rex Flour.
100 lbs. S. W. Flour
REMEMBER— You receive a Cash Register slip for each pur -
chase and when you have $23 or more we will pay you either
in cash or merchandise a sum equal to 2 54 % of the amount of
your slips. This brings your merchandise still lower. Town
customers who desire to use our City Delivery service may buy
our Cash Coupon Books and 254% is deducted from the face
value at the time of the purchase. THESE BOOKS MUST BE
PAID FOR IN CASH. NO CHARGING. WE THREW
AWAY OUR BOOKS.
s
X
A WORD ABOUT CREDIT—Credit is based upon faith in
another person's honesty, integrity and ability to pay. It is a
noble and commendable thing to have confidence in one anoth
»
X
X
er.
X
*
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just as you may have confidence in one person and have
no confidence in another, although one may be as good as the
other, so also may a merchant make a bad deal in his credits.
A percentage of loss is inevitable no matter how ably you may
judge your customers. This loss, together with the other
penses attendant upon credit sales—is too great under present
conditions. No way has yet been found to avoid this extra
expense and loss except by a strict policy of selling for CASH
ONLY. This is the method we are henceforth going to follow.
M
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Moe Mercantile Co
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We feel that, as we have the best set of customers in the world, they will help
us to make this new policy a huge success by taking advantage of our lower
prices and better service which we can give when we have no accounts to
worry about. Of course, we must collect our old accounts but we believe
these will soon melt away and we hope that no old accounts will keep our good
customers away with their cash. If they do it is a double loss to us and 11
we are ac d°unts f 0 r you it is a double reason why you should g> ve
us your CASH BUSINESS and not ask for further credit. We feel very con
fident that our good old customers will cooperate with us in our endeavor to
be of better service.
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WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY'
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PHONE 5
i PLENTYWOOD].
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urday, June 11th. This change was
made necessary to avoid a conflict of
dates which would have resulted, as
the County Progressive Farmers are
holding a picnic on the 18th at Medi
cine Lake.
There will be a baseball game in
the afternoon and a dance in
i evening, with games and races
the kiddies. Every member of the
R p - s j nv ited out for a good time,
i ' __
„ , c • School to
KocRy spring ocnoot 10
Have Pie Social and Uance
Rocky Spring school located on
Rural R^g No. 2, southwest of town,
j g tQ have a p j e soc i a i an d dance on
qr uesday> May 31st. The weatherman
^ as predicted fine roads and excellent
| weather f or that time, and the citi
zeng around that district are expect
ti a hup . e crow d. All the girls are
asdted to bring pies instead of bas
| kgtg
The music will be good, the floor
fine and the eats beyond comparison.
J 2 very0ne who goes will have one of
the begt evenin g S 0 f his life, they tell
the
for
us.
is Lindberg Makes Longest Non
5 . Flight In Shortest Time
"
:
1
won There was regret, of course,
for Nungesser and Coli, and regret,
(too, that the daring Frenchmen had
not been the first. But there was no
■ bitterness in their greeting of the
American winner.
(Continued from page One)
It was the common people of
France who first hailed the intrepid
Lindbergh as he emerged from what
| only Friday morning he had called his
j "death chamber. ' Shortly after 10:10,
the roar of his motor, for which they
had been waiting for hours, came
out of the clear night sky to the
ears of the multitude. Police lines
were swept aside as thousands surg
e d over the field to welcome the man
who had won their hearts and earned
immortal fame.
* T
'There he is. the cry went up as
the rays of the searchlights gleamed
upon the monoplane gracefully de
scending from the darkness which
had enveloped all and through which
only the sound of the motor gave
warning of his approach. At this in
slant the crowds began their race
across the field.
Smoothly the airplane, the Spirit
of St. Louis," glided down upon the
.lighted ground. Even before it had
come to a pause a hundred hands
* j caught hold of the wings, and scores
* of feet were trampling upon one an
* other in an effort to reach the side
of the fuselage, within which sat
young man who, all alone, had suc
ceeded in flying from New York
Paris without a stop.
The wheels had scarcely ceased
roll, the propeller had barely come
to a stop, when Lindbergh, weary
eyed, but smiling, got up from the
seat where he had so long sat, and
in a casual voice, almost drowned
by the cheers of thousand, said with
charming simplicity:
"Well, here we are."
*
*
*
*
He put his leg over the side of the
cockpit, and it was grasped by a doz
en hands. So was his other leg,
he he could get it out of the
Holding him high and
as
soon
machine. I I
cheering him, with cheers that came
from te heart, as well as the lungs,
the crowd took him to itself.
Saturday night he lies in
his country's embassy. ■ _
midnight when he reached there—4 i
hours after he got out of his bed in
New York to make the great adven
ture in which already so many others
had failed.
bed in
It was after
BRITISH TAKE WAR
STEP TOWARD RUSSIA
(Continued fro m page One)
like a spark of powder magazine.
Baldwin will try to break relations
in such a way that the contracts with
British firms will not be endangered.
British business is afraid that much
business with Russia will go to the
United States and other countries.
It is anticipated that there will be
some opposition from the labor
benches to the policy outlined by Mr.
Baldwin.
London—Diplomatic relations be
tween Great Britain and Soviet Rus
sia will be broken subject to approv
al of the house of commons
Thursday, Premier Baldwin announc
ed today. The government's decision
is a sequence of the recent raid on
Soviet house in London.
Stating that the British govern
on
a
to
to
ment intended to terminate the pres
ent trade agreement and require the
withdrawal of the Russian trade dele
gation and the Soviet mission from
London, he declared that the British
diplomatic representative in Moscow
would be recalled, according to dis
patches given out by the Associated'
Press.
Will Protect Trade
The legitimate use of Arcos,
Russian commercial organization, will
not be affected by the government's
decision, he continued, adding that
Great Britain was prepared, while
terminating privileges conferred by
certain articles of the trade agree
ment, to make all the arrangements
necessary for ordinary trade facili
ties between the two countries.
The government decision, the pre
mier said, was based on investiga
tions regarding the "propaganda and
subversive" activities of the Russian
trade delegation which culminated
the recent raid of Soviet house and
the seizure of various documents and
files.
the
Secret Addresses Revealed
Among these papers, the premier
said, was one snatched from
hands of a man burning certain doc
uments, the seized paper containing
a list of secret addresses, including
some in the United States. This
per, he continued, shows means
communicating with the Communist
parties in the United States, Mexico,
South America, Canada, Australia,
New Zealand and South Africa.
The premier charged that Soviet
house had been habitually used as
clearing house for subversive conf
spondence, including a "hands off
China" campaign, as well as military
espionage and subversive activities
throughout the British empire and
North and South America.
Blame is Placed.
Responsibility for the tactics of the
trade delegation and for the abuse
of the facilities afforded the latter,
could not be escaped by the Soviet
government, the premier declared. It
would be difficult to believe, he con
tinued that "while one organ of the
Soviet government thus was break
ing its solemn undertakings, that the
other organ of that government in
Great Britain, namely the Soviet mis
sion and the Soviet government itself
were not parties to these proceed
ings."
Premier Baldwin
the conservative benches when he en
tered the house.
While the premier attached the
condition that the break be made sub
ject to approval of the house at
Thursday's debate on the Russian
situation, little doubt exists that the
government party will uphold the
ministry's decision and formal rela
tions thus will end.
Premier Baldwin's statement indi
cated that the cabinet felt amply
warranted in severing relations by
the results of the raid on the Soviet
house with the evidence adduced to
show that the house was being used
as headquarters for subversive cam
paigns. The premier declared, how
ever, that the raid findings were not
the only ground for the decision, but
a long series of anti-British activi
ties by Soviet Russia.
cheered from
■a a.
IN THE LIMELIGHT
(Continued from page One)
In
problem than a military one.
fact, success depends mostly upon
our economic management for the
military is a science upon which
those trained in the service are to
be relied upon, and we of the plain
in
civil occupations can not aid them
except by reinforcing thorn in all
that is needed for the prosecution of
the war. as long as it lasts.
"The governor of the great state
of Minnesota has said that there is
but one issue—"loyalty"—and pro
ceeded to divide the people into two
classes. It is observable that a few
persons do that. What is the dif
ference between the two?
"The difference is that a few
would destroy democracy to win the
war, and the rest of us would win
the war to establish democracy.
"The 'wise statesmen' of both po
litical parties have failed to protect
the people. Consequently, today
those who have be«en favored by un
fair laws, less than 2 per cent of our
population, own 65 per cent of the
wealth; and 65 per cent of the people
the working classes, only own 5 per
cent of the wealth. Most of the
workers only get a bare subsistence.
This condition is wrong and injuri
ous to the best interests of our coun
try. Indeed, our country can not
survive unless this situation is cor
pa
of
a
"We must put into practice
home those principles for which we
reeled.
havo sent our boys to fight abroad.
"What did we go to war for? The
president has said that we are in the
war to win world democracy. The
governor of Minnesota has failed to
grasp that point. For many months
democracy has not existed in
state.
our
The
"In their campaign against tho
League, the principles of patriotism
have been prostituted to serve the
profiteers and many politicians have
followed their path.
"These profiteers and politicians,
protended guardians of loyalty, seek
to perpetuate themselves in special
priviledge and in office; they en
deavor to change election rules,, fear
ing the will of the majority of citi
zens of our country; thoy assume
that they are called upon to pass
upon the acts and motives of those
citizens who are only endeavoring to
follow out their constitutional rights
of political and economic organiza
tion and expression in a legal, loyal
and orderly way, guaranteed to them
by the laws of the» state and the na
lion, but which state officials have
failed to uphold. By their failure
to uphold and protect the people in
these rights they have themselves
created a most important issue in
our state.
"All the people are loyal,
few exceptions are only isolated in
dividuals, comparatively so few that
it creates no issue, for our people
are American, whether born in this
country or naturalized Americans.
Wherever a disloyalist exists he is
an exception and should be arrested
and dealt with by law, and no false
issue of loyalty should stalk over
the country to create prejudice and
riots.
"That issue, is real democracy.
LEGAL NOTICES
i
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF
I THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL DIS
j TRICT OF THE STATE OF MON
1TANA, IN AND FOR THE COUN
|
j

|
TY OF SHERIDAN.
CHARLES FJERESTAD, Plaintiff,
versus
CHRISTIAN SAMUEL IBSEN and
SEVERINE IBSEN, his wife, H.
G. SCHREIBER, PATHMANN
SCHREIBER MERCANTILE COM
PANY, a corporation, SHERIDAN
COUNTY, State of Montana,
body corporate and Politic, FARM
ERS STATE BANK, a corporation,
of Medicine Lake, Montana, and
FRED IBSEN, Receiver of said
Bank, STATE BANK OF GRE
NORA, a corporation, and L.
BAIRD, Receiver of said Bank,
STATE BOARD OF HAIL INSUR
ANCE, and E. K. BOWMAN,
Chairman and A. H. Bowman,
E. Harmon, P. J. Anderson and
J. Anderson, Members of said State
Board of Hail Insurance, Defend
ants.
To be sold at Sheriff's Sale, on
118th day of June, A. D. 1927, at
at jhour of two (2) o'clock P. M, of said
i day, at the front door of the County
1
the
Court House, at Plentywood, in
County of Sheridan, State of Mon
tana, to the highest bidder for cash,
the following described Real Estate,
situated, lying and being in the Coun
ty of Sheridan, State of Montana, to
wit:
The North half of Section two (2),
in Township thirty-three (33) North
of Range fifty-eight (58) East of the
Montana Meridian, Montana; also
described as the South half of the
North half, and lots one (1), two
(2), three (3) and four (4), of the
same section, township and range.
And more particular all the right,
title, claim and interest of the above
named defendants, in and to the real
estate hereinbefore described.
Dated this 25th day of May, A. D.
1927 .
TRICT OF THE STATE OF MON
PAULINA H. GAENSLEN, Plain
RODNEY SALISBURY,
Sheriff of Sheridan County, Mont.
By P. GALLAGHER,
Deputy Sheriff.
GRANT BAKEWELL,
Medicine Lake, Mont.,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
8-t4
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL DIS
TANA, IN AND FOR THE COUN
TY OF SHERIDAN.
tiff,
versus
JACOB JACOBSEN and SIGNE
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Breaking and
Summerfallow Season
IS CLOSE AT HAND
A 15-80 or a 10-20 McCormick Deering Tractor and a
P. & O. Engine Plow makes an excellent outfit with
which to do this work. Remember, McCormick Deering
Tractors come to you already equipped for POWER Take
Off, with Belt, Pulley ; and with 64 Mud Lugs, bolted on
with 2 heavy bolts.
Come in and let us demonstrate.
ie.
Dooley Implement Co.
the
the
DOOLEY
and
PLENTYWOOD
y
JACOBSEN, his wife,
NELLIE V
MILLER, EDW. STUBBAN j I*
JOHNSON, SECURITY '
BANK OF MEDICINE
MONTANA, a corporation,
C. FAABORG, Receiver
Security State Bank of Medici
Lake, Montana, Defendants.
STATE
lake,
and s.
of
thi
Cille
To be sold at Sheriff's Sale
the 18th day of June, A. D. 1927
the hour of two (2) o'clock P. m"
of said day, at the front door of tV
County Court House, at Plentywood
in the County of Sheridan, State '
Montana, to the highest bidder
cash, the following described real
täte, situated, lying and being in T
County of Sheridan, State of Mon.
tana, to-wit:
The Northeast quarter of Section
Three (3), in Township thirtv-t» ft
(32) North of Range Fifty-seven (571
East of the Montana Meridian, Mon
tana, containing One Hundred Sixt
(160) acres, more or less, according
to the United States Government 8
vey thereof.
And more particular all the right
title, claim and interest of the above
named defendants, in and to the real
estate hereinbefore described.
on
Of
for
sut
Dated this 25th day of May, A D
1927.
RODNEY SALISBURY,
Sheriff of Sheridan County, Mont
By P. GALLAGHER,
Deputy Sheriff.
GRANT BAKEWELL,
Medicine Lake, Montana,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
S.
M4 I

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