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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, August 19, 1927, Image 7

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ip. NOTICES
4—348b
F 0R PUBLICATION
of the Interior,
at Glasgow, Mont.
August 3, 1927
nTir r js hereby given that Mads
f guardian of person and
S ^ Lphen Chepiha, an mcom
of Plentywood, Mon
-etent P^° 'lulv 19 1922, made
S'homestead Glasgow
H.^tead FallSf No . 057782,
n0 . na ' 2 Section 35, Town
tor ^ 1 Range 55 E., Montana
*9 has filed notice of mten
* endl make final three year Proof,
daim to the land above
•■"iS bete E. E. Be.anski, U.
**rîSÎni«ioner, at Plentywood,
LÏÏTÔnthe 16th day of Septem
1S27
VOflCE
Department
J55 Office
t
tion w
an t names as witnesses: Hans
Carl Hol je, Nels Hagen,
, all of Reserve, Mon
A. H. STRINGHAM,
Acting Register.
*v : ,urse
lalvor
Everson
194t
alias summons
... tHE DISTRICT COURT OF
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL DIS
T 0- THE STATE OF MON
Î1VA IN WD FOB THE COUNTY
Jr SHERIDAN._
tOITSE MARTIN, Plaintiff,
w ~ —versus—
MARTIN, Defendant.
ceorge
THE STATE OF MONTANA
Sends greetings to the above named
You^are hereby summoned to an
er the complaint in this action
Uich is filed in the office of the
PROFESSIONAL
DIRECTORY
DR. HARRY J. ROBB
Physician and Surgeon
Phones;
Residence 124
PLENTYWOOD, MONT.
Office 36
DR. L G, STEELE,
SPECIALIST
EYE, EAR NOSE and THROAT
Office at
Community Tonsil and Adenoid
Clinic, Plentywood, Montana
Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted
DR. G E. CAMPBELL
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Ofice: one door east of Telephon«
Exchange.
PLENTYWOOD,
MONT.
Dt. Edw. E. York, D.C..PI..C.
—Electrotherapy—
Mountain Sun Treatments
Spear s Painless System of Adjuat
Plentywood
ing
Montana
DR. W. D. ROY
d;
Office Over West's Cafe
PHOn 11®
Plentywood
MO)
martin nelson
Undertaker
Automobil« Hearse in Connection
PLENTYWOOD
MONT.
J. G. DOBING
Abstraster •
' PLENTYWOOD abstract CO. *
• n. 1® Vslkna Building. •
Plentywood
Montana. *
HOWARD M. LEWIS
lawyer
!*•••• • • •
Joknaon THE Abetraetmu
, SHERIDAN
• 9«. company
, Only The Best Abstract« Of Title
• , Plentywood, Montana
•••• ••••
A. C. ERICKSON
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Practice In AH Gttiirt®
rlentvwood, Montana
WUOBT.R. KAHLE
Chiropractor
Neurocalometer Service"
Outlook Montana
it
"THE MINT"
Cigar Store
Plentywood
Montana
0* M. Stadig, Prop.
Clerk of this court, a copy of which
is herewith served upon you in th«
County wherein you reside, and to
file your answer and serve a copy
thereof upon the plaintiff's attorney
within twenty days after service of
this Summons, exclusive of the day of
service; and in case of your failure to
appear or answer, judgment will be
taken against you, by default, for the
relief demanded in the complaint
DIVORCE-ACTION P
Marriage July 12, 1920 at Billings,
Montana No issue Wilful desertion
by defendant October 15. 1920
tarily, without _ '
plaintiff's will, and without her con
sent, which has continued from that
M r ^ aye I : . , Absolute divorce.
More full particulars in plaintiff's
verified complaint, to which reference
is hereby made.
Witness my hand and seal of said
1927* thlS 3 ° th day ° f JuIy ' A ' D
!r? e i^ he > D - J - OLSON, Clerk.
(District Court) By A. M. Hanson,
TT J T . Deputy Clerk.
Howard M. Lewis, Esquire
Plentywood, Montana,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
First Publication August 5, 1927.
Last Publication August 26, 1927.
Allegations:
volun
and
cause
against
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
IN THE DISTRICT COURT
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL DIS
r' STATE OF MON
TANA, IN AND FOR THE COUN
TY OF SHERIDAN.
OF
FEDERAL land bank of
bCOKANE, a corporation, Plaintiff,
vs.
JACOB EHRMANNTRAUT, unmar
ried; LIBERTY NATIONAL FARM
LOAN ASSOdATiQN, a corpS
tion; FIRST NATIONAL BANK
IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA
a corporation; STATE BANK OF
PLENTYWOOD, MONTANA, a
corporation, and FRED IBSEN as
Receiver of State Bank of Plenty
wood, Montana, a corporation; Ö.
ROUNSEVILLE; STATE
£° A gD OF HAIL INSURANCE,
™9t?X ANA; and SHERIDAN
COUNTY, MONTANA, a municipal
corporation, and W. J. BYE De
fendants.
TO BE SOLD AT SHERIFF'S
0ALE, at the front door of the Court
house in Plentywood, Sheridan Coun
ty, Montana, on the 10th day of Sep
tember, 1927, at the hour of two
o clock P. M„ of said day, the follow
ing described property, to-wit:
The Northeast Quarter, the North
east Quarter of the Northwest
Quarter, the Northeast Quarter of
the Southeast Quarter of Section
Ten, Township Thirty-seven, North,
Range Fifty-six East of the Mon
tana Principal Meridian.
Dated this 15th day of August
1927.
RODNEY SALISBURY,
Sheriff.
By P. GALLAGHER,
Deputy-Sheriff.
THOMAS DIGNAN,
Attorney for Plaintiff,
Glasgow, Montana.
20-t4
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Sealed proposals will be received by
the board of trustees of School Dist.
No. 43, Sheridan County, Montana, up
till 3:00 on the third (3rd) day of
September, 1927, at the schoolhouse
in Comertown, Montana, for furnish
ing building materials for a'four (4)
room school house.
Also sealed proposals for the
con
struction work on said 4-room school
house.
Proposals must contain a certified
check or its equivalent equal to 5%
of the amount of the bid..
Plans and specifications may be
seen at the clerk's office in Comer
town, Montana.
The right is reserved to reject any
or all bids.
PEDER BRUVOLD, Chairman.
CARL MAGNUSSEN, Clerk.
20-3t
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Sealed proposals will be received by
the Board of Trustees of School Dis
trict No. 43, Sheridan County, Mont.,
up till 3:00 on the 3rd day of Sep
tember, 1927, for the furnishing of
coal for the school year of 1927-28, at
so much per ton for the Comertown
school.
PEDER BRUVOLD, Chairman.
CARL MAGNUSSEN, Clerk.
Real Estate Transfers
*



Sheriff to Marie G. Bellack, $2580.
57, NW%, NEY*, 32, E% NEK,
31-37-66.
Sheriff to O. M. Corwin Co., $2990.
60, NK SWK, 3, NEK SEK, SK
NWK, NEK NWK, SK NEK, 4-34
64.
Sheriff to Emma Roberts, $2466.86,
lots 1, 2, EK NWK, NEK, 30-36-57.
Charles W. Gaenslen to Richard A.
Vohl, et al, $1.00, NEK, 29-32-56.
Lewis E. States to Portal State
Bank, $1.00, lot 11, block 6, Westby.
L. R. Baird, Rec. to Martin Nere
son, $1.00, lot 11, block 6, Westby.
Sheriff to Mrs. W. H. Phelps,
$2686.80, NK, 12-36-66.
C. E. Coryell et ax to C. G. Chris
tianson, $2500.00, lots 11, 12, blk. 3,
Bolsters Add., Plentywood.
U. S. A. to Mads Petersen, patent,
SWK, W% SEK, SEK SEK, 24,
SEK SEK, 23-35-57.
Sheriff to Paul A. Lofsness, $915.
39, WK SWK, 15-35-58.
Eng. Torstenson to Schnitzler Corp.,
$1472.80, NEK, 34-31-56.
Henry Hagen to J. B. Jergen, $3,
508.68, N%, 35-36-56.
Rose Robinson to Wilaljm J. Rob
inson, $1.00, lots 19, 20, 21, 22, 5, 6,
7, 8, 9, of 6-37-55. __
Sheriff to
$6,162.28, NK SEK, SEK SEK, 8,
E% EK, SWK SEK, 17-35-54.
U. S. A. to Harry R, Guenther, pat
ent, EK SEK, 8-33-58.
Barnes Bros, to Mont. Min. & Agri.
Corp., $100, SEK, 3-31-57, SWK, 2
31-57.
Frank Desonia to Trustees School
Dist. 75, $1.00, part NWK NEK, 11
36.
Frank E. Guenther et ux to
Wright, $1500.00, lot 3, block 18, Plen
tywood.
Henry Gray et ux to Westland Oil
Co., $1.00, lots 10, 11, block 10, Red
stone.
John Bjorklund to R. W. Black, E%
of 14-35-56.
Tri. State Land Co. to Citizens
Lawrence J. Langer,
Ida
Just Dying of Curiosity
By Albert T. Rad
u\
rfT
■'I
HENRY FORD
plan room
PRIVATE
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ifr.
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AUTdCASTth—.
State Bank, Dooley, $50.00, lot 2, blk.
7, Dooley. v
Citizens State Bank, Dooley to Mel
vin W. Markuson, $1.00, lot'2, block
7, Dooley.
Paul Babcock et ux to Frank E.
Guenther, $3,000.00, lots 1, 2, block
10, Plentywood.
Scandinavians Manage
Labor Summer School
Geneva Park, Ill. —_ (FP)—Among
the scattered groups of American
workers in whom the desire for en
lightenment on broad labor lines is
leading to organized educational ef
fort, the young Swedish-Americans of
the Chicago district are making
markable progress. Their
school on the Fox river near Geneva,
which opened Aug. 1, is proceeding
with the customary Scandinavian
nestness and intelligence.
100 Youths Participate
About 100 youths of both
re
summer
ear
sexes,
with a sprinkling of elders, are camp
ing in tents in an attractive 50-acre
wooded park belonging to a sympa
thetic organization. Excellent hearty
meals are served under the trees in
fair weather and in capacious build
ings at other times,
tures' and discussion hours as w r ell as
lighter programs morning, afternoon
and evening. The river invites bath
ers and there is a dance floor under
roof. The total cost to each partici
pant in the school's work is $10 a
week—meals, shelter, instruction
tertainment and all.
School Will Last Into Winter Months
A few of the students are radicals
but all are workers. Their education
will continue through the winter in
further courses and the same oppor
tunity will be offered to their coun
trymen in other American cities be
sides Chicago. The activity is man
aged by the Scandinavian Workers'
Educational League of which Ivar
Johnson, 7946 Indiana Ave., Chicago,
is corresponding secretary. Branches
are organized or under way in New
England, New
There are lec
en,
York, Cleveland, De
troit, Waukegan, Ill., Minneapolis,
St. Paul, Duluth and other Scandi
navian centers. It now has 8,000
members and has the backing of fra
ternal and sick benefit societies, Good
Templar lodges and worker clubs.
Leland Olds Lectures
The summer school at Geneva Park
offers lectures and discussions in
American labor hitsory, natural
ence, world politics, history and lit
erature. The director is Prof. Oscar
Olsson of the Normal College in Swe
den and a Socialist member of the
Swedish parliament. He is a lead
ing figure in the Swedish Workers
Education Assn., which has over 1,
000,000 dues-paying members and 5,
000 study circles. He is studying
American education methods and
helping to organize study classes.
Other lecturers included Lealnd Olds
and Carl Haessler of The Federated
Press and Ellis Peterson of Ny Tid,
the Swedish radical weekly.
SCI
Yes-Yes INDEED
GERALD—HOW LONG IS IT
SINCE YOU WERE ABROAD?
JULIA
AGO.
THREE HUSBANDS
This Car
«ItUiiA wkm
»
I
V Motor
v Radiator
vRear Axle
v Tran? -ni*» ion
717
vJanSL
«
This Tag Protects Your Purchase
. , L® absolutely inspections. Genuine parts
rtam of the quality of are used for all replace
any reconditioned used ments.
ear you buy from us—for .. , ,
when we recondition a the car haa P assed
car, we do the job thor- inspection, a red
oughlyl O.K. tag is attached to
All nrr, h- • j , the radiator cap. This tag
au work 13 done by our is the purchaser's guaran
own expert mechanics, tee of value — look for
ana is subjected to the it when you buy a used
regular factory testa and carl
v Starting
v Lighting
x ou can
v Ignition
v Battery
t^Tiret
vllphoUtery
v-Top
F.ndor.
vFtabb
PETERSON CO., Plentywood
I B. LARSEN, Weslhy
QUALITY AT L O w COS J
Grease Gun From Tire Pump
Perhaps you might like to try this
idea for making a grease gun from a
tire pump which we picked up in this
week's issue of THE FARMER of ST.
PAUL.
An Illinois correspondent writes: In
a recent issue you ask for suggestions
for using discarded auto tire pumps.
I am sending you diagram (D638)
and description of a grease gun I
made to grease differentials and
transmissions.
Take a piece of soft wood four
inches long and two inches wider than
pump barrel, bore hole just large
enough for barrel to screw in tight,
the barrel cutting its own threads.
Now bore a small hole through wood
block to strike the center of the
large hole in bottom of barrel and
screw in a one-fourth-inch pipe with
elbow as shown. To fill with grease,
c
D-638.
Ôcrenv off here n-rri
artf remove p/anqer
/o //// vr/fh grease
Bore ho/e in b/ocA
a fnf/e sma/kr /far?
purr?p farre/. ^
Bereu? harre/ /n/o \
ho/e /e//?/jg i/cu/ \
//s o?vr? /breach.
\
.
S
Wood b/oc/ s
oboed B"square
B/fatv —
fp/pe
Greùse Gun From T/re Pump
unscrew top cap and remove plunger.
Plunger leather will probably have to
be stiffened with heavy leather.
It would seem more convenient to
leave the bottom and the air discharge
hose on the pump, increase the length
of this hose, and force the grease
through this into the differential or
transmission.—I. W. D.
Roosevelt Weather
Reports Show Most
Rainfall at Bainville
Wolf Point, Aug. 11.—Reports of
weather observers in Roosevelt coun
ty for July show greatest rainfall
was at Bainville and the least at Mc
Cabe. Records follows: George Pier
cy, Bainville, 1.76 inches; Andrew
Harbo, Froid,
Bainville; Earl Goin,. Poplar,
Gordon Davis, Brockton, 1.00;
eminent agency, Poplar, 1.56; Veda
LaRoche, Laurville, 1.05; Einer Bent
sen, McCabe, .53; Ed Schillinger, gov
ernment weather observer, Vida, Mc
Cone county, 1.26 inches.
1.55; Oscar Nelson,
1.49;
Gov
* Wolf Point. Aug. 11.— Knut *
* Hendrickson, McCone county •
* bachelor farmer, has returned af- *
* ter eight months spent id Nor- *
* way and makes interesting com- *
* ment on his observations there. *
* When asked if he had found a *
* wife in Norway he said it would *
tTÄÄSTÄ *.
* The quota from that country is *
* exhausted for the year and appli- *
* cations now on fil£ he was ?o!d, *
* would fill the quota for four *
* years. American automobiles are *
* common, mostly of the lower prie- *
* ed makes. But cars cost several *
» hundred dollars more than here *
* and the luxury tax on a Ford is *
* about $300 a year. Business and •
* farming is in an exacting rut and *
* money is scarce. It was very hard *
* for his friends in Norway to be- *
* lieve that land that produces good *
* crops can be bought here for $10 *
* to $15 an acre. *
Immigration Kept
McCone County Man
From Norway Marriage
Wolf Point Musical
Director Takes New
Job In Stanley, N. Dak.
Wolf Point, Aug. 15.—Mr. and
Mrs. D. T. Staples and children have
returned from Glacier park, where
Mr. Staples has been playing with an
orchestra since early in June. Mr.
Staples who has been musical direc
tor in Wolf Point schools for several
years, has accepted a position at Val
ley City, N. D., at a substantial in
crease in salary. There he will con
duct three bands, and he left Thurs
day to take up his new work. His
family will join him in about two
weeks.
Olefines and Vitamins
The doctor thumps your chest and
feels your pulse and informs you that you
need food containing more "vitamins."
When your motor thumps and
pounds on a pull it informs you that it
needs a gasoline containing more "ole
fines".
Scientists have found that the pres
ence of a sufficient amount of olefines in
gasoline prevents "detonation"
knock," which is so noticeable in ordinary
gasoline.
"fuel
or
Some motorists use ordinary gaso
line, knock and all. Others use ordinary
gasoline, doped to kill the knock,
more particular motorists
LAND Gasoline, which contains the pro
per proportion of olefines that nature has
given it to make it a perfect, anti-knock
fuel.
The
WEST
use
Westland Oil Co.
SEASON IS CLOSED
ON UPLAND BIRDS
IN STATE FOR YEAR
Montana's state fish and
. . game com
mission last week declared the season
closed for the year on all upland game
birds, when the following motion
passed unanimously at the quarterly
meeting at the state capitol:
cause of general unfavorable reports
on the early hatch, the state fish
and game commission hereby declares
a closed season in the entire I
on all upland game birds to prevent
undue depletion and destruction which
would require
was
Be
state
years to correct."
Hence ducks and geese will be the
only game birds available to Montana
hunters this
year.
Action was taken by the
sion after a thorough investigation
conducted by Chairman Thomas N.
Marlowe of Missoula, Game Warden
Robert H. Hill and every member of
the state board.
commis
Hundreds of letters have been pour
ing into state headquarters from
sportsmen .and country clubs urging
that the season be closed because of
the bird shortage.
In the canvass conducted by
Marlowe among rod and gun clubs in
the 56 «ounties of the state he
ed 49 replies, with clubs favoring the
closed season and bird conservation.
Out of the 49 replies 36 were for
a closed season, eight opposed, and
five qualified the reply by asking for
a closed season on some species and
an open season on others. All state
deputy game wardens have urged the
closed season. No reply was receiv
ed from the Butte club but the Ana
conda club petitioned for a closed sea
son.
Mr.
receiv
Reports received by the commission
from ranchers and farm machinery
the
are that the hatch
the wet spring has been almost a
total failure. Other reports place the
hatch at 20 or 25 per cent of normal.
Federal game officials have made
similar reports.
Complain of Pheasants
Because of continued ridiculous
complaints reaching the commission
yarding alleged depredations of
^ pheasants and Hungarian
^
! C0 ™™ SS1 ™ in '
?*!] ma £ 6 a
°J f
îînSw« ^ Æ d g H It*
to r the , b . oard at the , ne * fc
farmer!' rearÄauTnd antn %
"?he C > teaU pa '
^ dedanng that . f th * Hungarians
1™" ^. at they beat down
^ aI , lght . m . a
k f rne , 1 , s Wlth
npwqiMinpr art! 1° 0W- 14»
"I r .. irt "^suggested the use
no . ,°P e f n se / san 18 d f
016 c ? ul ? ty
^ the . commission
a ^ d the '^estigatiori|
g™" , th ^ c + harRe groundless that
îï e n ?w S ^f 1T ,«i Pped and transferred
VIENNA REVOLT DUE TO
BRUTALITY BY POLICE
Vienna — (FP)—Deliberate police
brutality is held responsible for turn
ing a peaceful demonstration in Vi
enna into the recent revolt which cost
the lives of many workmen. A heavy
toll was also suffered by the police
who did not count on the militant re
sentment of the masses.
On hearing of the acquittal of three
fascists who had confessed killing a
Socialist and his child, thousands of
workers marched in a spontaneous
but peaceful demonstration through
the streets of Vienna. The police
fired without provocation. Instantly
hundreds of workers filled the streets,
barricades were built and the labor
guard forced the police to retreat.
Three reactionary newspaper plants
were smashed and the palace of jus
tice was burned.
To get control of the situation the
trade unions and the Socialist party
called a general strike and entered
into negotiations with the govern
ment. While communists wanted to
carry on, the labor leaders were eag
er to stop the street fighting. Facing
fascist Italy on one border and Hun
gary on the other, Austrian Social
ists considered the odds against them.
In face of the revolutionary situa
tion, the reactionary Austrian gov
ernment found itself in great diffi
culties. Although it controlled the
local police it could not count on the
army and dared not call out the Vien
nese garrison. It fell back on picked
regiments from the provinces where
the Catholic clergy still dominates.
The revolt ended in orderly fashion
after the government acceded to the
demand of the Socialist to call
parliament. The announcement that
the farcical verdict will be reviewed
helped to appease the workers. The
special police organized by the work
ers received official recognition and
the same rights as the official police.
Viennese labor in control of the city,
shows no intention of giving up its
special police paid out of the city
treasury. The official police is Under
the control of the nat'l. government.
The day the worker victims of the
slaughter were buried the official
labor paper, Arbeiter Zeitung, ridi
culed the talk of reconciliation raised
by papers of the Catholic and capital
ist parties.
"Reconciliation? There is no
conciliation. In our mourning for our
fallen brothers and sisters nothing
can be further from our thoughts than
reconciliation. What we swear at the
grave of dead is not reconciliation,
but pasisonate struggle against the
bourgeois capitalist world, in which
workers are shot down like beasts,
the obituary declared.
German workers and republicans
declared their solidarity with the Aus
trian workers.
re
* y
^
Ä _ «
PKAfûrflAn
► rrOieCIIOIl \\
• ^
Hawaiian Sugar Victim
Leaves Jail on Parole
Honolulu
attorney for the Filipino sugar work
ers, who was framed by the sugar
planters during the 1924 strike in Ha
waii, has been released from prison on
parlone with the understanding that
he will go to the United States. His
plans are to arrive in Los Angeles
Aug. 19, where the Intal. Labor De
fense and other champions of labor's
political prisoners will give him a
rousing welcome. The central labor
union of Honolulu has been active in
his defense during the 3 years he
was in prison.
(FP)—Pablo Manlapit,
FOR
< *
o

AGAINST
% FIRE, LIGHTNING, CY
CLONE, WINDSTORM |
GET A
Policy
IN THE
1 k
*
« .
(


o
Northwestern
National
Z
..
* FOR BATES «
o SEE "JERRY" THE LITTLE
; ; agent ; ;
< *
* •
O
Gall or Address
..
G. G. POWELL
• •
; j Plentywood
i——
Montana

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