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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, December 16, 1927, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1927-12-16/ed-1/seq-3/

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SgÉDONDmONS
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FOR RATES •:
"JERRY" THE LITTLE ;
AGENT
Call or Addrws
! G. G. POWELL
Plentywood
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QUALITY PLUS SERVICE
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Don't Forget—
—says wise old Santa, that gifts are fine,
but after all, the way to a man's heart is
tbe stomach,—and the feast is a very im
portant part of the holiday celebration.
Sorem ^ Co. is stocked with the finest
groceries in town, and can take care of
your every need—at prices that cannot be
equalled. We have a store full of goodies
awaiting your order. Phone l 00 or come
in—either way you will receive the best
of service.
;
Sorem & Co.
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FOR CHRISTMAS
Remember
&
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neip OCilQ
—, .. j
iv *essage of Cla.SS Solidarity
ç ®
SHo « them that those on the outside have not forgotten
tnem. Buy Christmas coupons at 10c each.
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Class-war
Prisoners
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• Uth St.
! York City
I co find $3 for which please send me a book of 30 Christmas I
? d " **%* ™^r ends : -
Prisoner^ , j h ? P . contmue y° ur monthly assistance to the class-war
Chri t nd taeir dependents and to give special help to them tor
' mas - 1
Labor Defense
Room 402
Name
AD DRESS .
CITY
'NTErnat
ION AL LABOR DEFENSE

ation of new buildings and improve
ments authorized since the first of
the year reaching a total of $1,141,
911. Buildings authorized or con- 1
strutted in October alone in Great!
Falls passed the $100,000 mark in val
nation. This is approximately a 200
cent increase over October of last
P er 1
year.
Buildings in the Helena vicinity in
du'.es a number of residences and
garageS) a mill a t the Springhill
,j ire an( j a z i nc .reducing plant at
East Helena which is just being com
pleted. When completed, this plant
will employ a force of approximately
100 men
One of the most noticeable features
in this year's building and construc
tion work is the number of new school
buildings that have been or are being
elected throughout the state.
some instances the buildings
ready for occupancy at the beginning
of the school year while in others
construction is still going on.
In some localities new school build- .
i igs have been authorized but work
■ M rot begin until next spring.;
Among these are: Worden, Huntley
pioje t high school; Great Falls high
' : ool building; Corvallis, grade
bool ! uilding, and Glasgow, Junior
high and auditorium.
-The Roosevelt grade school and
Miindergardten on Second avenue north
; in Great Falls will be opened Decern
ber 1. The new school building at
Whitehall is nearly finished. It Is
, bei : g built at a cost of $80,000.
The new unit of the Fergus county
high school at Lewstown is now un-
!dcr roof. The outside brick work i
finished and the $130,000 structure
" il 1 be ready for use about the first
of the year.
Among other building projects now
u (1er way in the state are: the con
i -truction of a new postoffice building
at Poison and the erection of a new
: ''curt on the Northern Pacific line at
I Stevensville. Poison will also have a
; new hotel, construction of which was
1 started last month.
qi
were
;
Westby Lad Makes High
ï Record for Attendance
i
;
Westby.— Olaf Christofferpon, who
for five years and three months has
j been neither tardy, nor absent from
1 school was held at home Thursday,
I December 7th because of a severe
"old
j To the best of our knowledge this
I is the highest mark for attendance of
I any pupil at the Westby school.
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La Mode
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A most appropriate frock for the
holiday festivities. Fashioned along
decidedly feminine lines of velvet
and georgette, and gaily embroid
ered in white. The skirt, which is
flared, has three tiers of black vel
vet. The round neck is smartly
finished with a fold of black velvet
PENNEY STORES IN
CREASES SALES
.
4 .° nt L G » n - f « r ol Noven \ ber — Llevea ;
on°2i h .. Per ;- Cd * ShoWS Increast ' of '
.40..if* 1er Cent.
1926, ï
reported by the J. C. Penney Co. are
$17,054,055.62.
This is an increase of $3,721,073.77
over gross sales for the same period
for 1926 which were $13,332,981.85
and shows a gain of 27.91 per cent.
Cumulative gross sales for the 11
months of this year are $130,149,214.- 1
65 as compared with $99,6966,606.43 j
for the eleven months of 19266, with j
the gain for the year, to date, being
_
(j Penney Co. Reoorts 27.91
Per
Gross sales for November,
30.56 per cent over last year.
Total sales for 1926 were $115,682,
1 737, which shows that sales for this
year are already 11.2 per cent ahead
of the total volume done last year.
The J. C. Penney Co. has steadily
maintained a leading position among
all the larger chain store groups this
year in percentage increase over last
I year.
According to a statement made by
! Earl C. Sams, president, the estimated
volume of $150,000,000 set for this
! year-will be reached if not exceeded.
Sales for November include those of
the Jones syndicate which was ac
quired by th eJ. C. Penney Co. during
the summer. ,
The recent addition of the 20 stores
operated' by the Golden Rule Mercan
' tile Co., with headquarters in Ogden,
Utah, will not show in the sales vol
ume of the company until January
when they start to operate under the
J. C. Penney Co. management.
Commenting on general sales con
ditions, Mr. Sams, who has recently
completed a tour among the J. C. Pen
ney Co. stores in Michigan, says, "The
general mercantile business of the
country has gone through a succession
of artificial sales periods induced by
severe floods, unusual weather condi
tions and, more recently, by a pro
; longed period of unusually warm
weather over most parts of the coun
i try.
I find means to meet these conditions,
which undoubtedly have a marked in
fluence on buying, especially in the
! dry goods field.
It is interesting to note that the
1 increase shown by the J. C. Penney
I Co. in Octobre was 29.4 per cent over
j the same month of last year and with- j
; in 1.5 per cent of the gain for the ten
! month period closing with October." !
Mr. Penney, who returned today
: from a protracted visit among the
western stores of the J. C. Penney Co.,
reports healthy increases in all west-1
ern points, with California, Oregon,
Washington and Utah showing up for
J. C. Penney Co. in excess of increases
registered by business in general.
till
Abstractors Will Hold Re- , ^
gional Meet in Glasgow mu
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Glasgow.— -The abstractors of dis
I trict No. 1 of the Montana State
Title association held a regional meet
1 ing
I ber
i Sheridan, Daniels, Roosevelt, Valley,
! Phillips, Elaine, Hill, and Liberty
i counties. Representatives from 12
j abstract companies attended.
! meeting was held in the office of the
j Glasgow Chamber of Commerce,
j This meeting was the last of seven
1 regional meetings held in the state,
i the others being at Miles City, De
I cember 5th; Billings, December 6th;
I Butte, December 7th; Missoula, De
I cember 8th; Kalispell, December 10.
j The object of the meetings is to
bring about a similarity in abstract
: ing throughout the state, W. B. Clark,
1 1 president of the state association, ex
j"
1er members of the title association
I or not.
m
1
in Glasgok Wednesday, Decem
14th. The district includes
The
11 Helena.—Montana s state railroad
!srssss ä
l ^ ^ quest of the Great Northern to
I ^ ^ own train service on the
• Scobey-Opheim extension. Train
vice has been maintained daily ex
cept Sunday since the completion of
the branch and the railroad now pro
poses installing tri-weekly service
between Scobey and Opheim. Merch
1 a nts and farmers of the district af
! fected have lodged protests.
I Harlow ton—Glenn farm produces
! j 40,000 bushels wheat from 1000 acres.
RAILWAY BOARD TO
MEET AT OPHEIM
new
ser
To Carry Filipino Message to
American Workers -Manlapit
Tours For Anti-lmperialists
I
;
.
Despite the conspiracy ot silence entered into by President
Coolidge and the rilipion "nationalist" senators, Quezon and Os-1
mena, the demand ol the people of the Philippines for national lib
eration will be carried directly to the workers and farmers of
America. Such is the significance of an announcement issued to
jday, that Pablo Manlapit. noted fighter for Filipino liberty, has
agreed to make a tour oi American cities speaking under the aus
pices oi the all-Ameirca Anti-Imperialist League.
Manlapit's tour will begin in Los |
Angeles on December 1. His schedule ;
will take him through all the Pacific
coast, northwestern, middlewestern i
antl A tlai ? tlc coast states According
to officials at the L nited States head- ,
quarters ot the All-America Anti- Im
pei iahst Legue, 39 Union Square,
New A ork, Manlapit should arrive in
this city about the middle of January. I
This will be the first time that a
recognized leader of the Filipino peo
pie has made such a tour. Quezon
and Osmena and other nationalist pol
iticians have visited this country
time and again but they have address
ed themselves almost entirely to the
luling elements of society—those very
elements who are responsible for
. T .
American Imperialist rule in the Phil
ippines. Manlapit will talk straight
His opinion is that
\° the masses.
America's largest colony will never
win her independence by polite peti-1
titions to Washington or even by at- j
ter dinner speeches at chambers of I
commerce banquets." * j
"Two years ago," Manlapit points i
out, "the Philippine people gave $ 1 ,-j
1000,000 to an inndependence fund,
j w r hich was squandered by futile junk- i
I eting trips to Washington. Only a (
I few months ago another large fund
was raised, entirely through voluntary!
contributions. There is much criti- i
; cism in the Philippine Islands as to I
' the use to which this money has been i
put. Doubt is everywhere expressedi
as to the intentions of the so-called
ï nationalist leaders who w-ere elected
to office by overwhelming majorities i
(on the program of 'immediate, com
plete and absolute independence for
the Philippines.' We are a nation of !
12,000,000 people. We w-ant our in
dependence and are able to make our I
demands felt. Our movement must
1 have faith in the Filipino masses—)
j particularly the workers and hard-1
j working farmers. As far as our at-1
titude toward the United States is
concerned we must have faith in the
common people rather than in the im
perialists and the moneyed interests."
Pablo Manlapit was bom at Lipa,
Batangas, Philippine Islands some 36
years ago. His father was a poor!f°r
peasant. He attended school at Ton
do, Manila, but at the age of 19 he
was oblidged to ship to the Hawaiian
Islands as a common laborer, as so
many Filipinos do. Labor is contract
ed for by the Sugar Trust interests,
who make big promises to the work
ers in the Philippines, promises which
are never kept after the workers have
been led far away from their homes
and are at the mercy of the sugar
trust.
Manlapit, along with many other
Filipinos, toiled for three years on
the plantations of the sugar trust in
Hawaii. Conditions were almost un
bearable and he developed a bitter
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We handle the HERO and EMERSON
Come in and
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KICKER in different sizes.
let us show them to you.
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Clean Seed is one of the foundations for a
Good Crop.
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DOOLEY IMPLEMENT CO.
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McCormick-Deering Dealers
and
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DOOLEY
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hatred for the sugar planters, per
sonified in the Hawaiian Sugar Plant
ers Association.
Some way or other he found time'
to study law and he resolved to use
his legal training in the interests of
the Filipino workers among whom he
lived. His first cases were in con
nection with the efforts of the work
ers to better their conditions.
stiike took place, involving
Filipinos, 25,000 Japanese and work
ers of all other nationalities in the
tenitory. The strike was successful,
A wage-increase of 50 per cent
secured.
The sugar trust never intended to
give in permanently ,however, and
wages were soon reduced below the 1
pre-strike level. Before 11 months
had passed they were down to $20.00
a month.
Meantime Manlapit was active in
He established 1
A big
20,000
was ;
the labor movement,
relations with the American workers
Honolulu and worked closely w-ith
George W. Wright, president of the
Honolulu central laoor council and ed
*tor of the Labor Review-. He also)
i-Published hi sown paper, "Ang Ban-j
t & y' which was printed in Tagalog i
(a native Filipino dialect land Span-j
ls Al,
- ^, ar . was a >' ear °\ crisis I
r .. e Filipino sugar workers in Ha
wau : lhe bie ! su ^ ar stri ke broke out
on ^pnl 1, 1924, the men responding
enthusiastically to the leadership of
Manlapit.
^ be su ^ar trust resorted to all
means to k ee P tbe workers from im
P ro ^ their conditions, even going,
, 0 . e extreme of having Filipino j
bab i es evicted from hospitals. Man -1
, Was the soul of She strike and
tbe P' anters early determined to rail
roa(l bim to i ail -
He was framed up, in one of the
most notorious frame-up scandals in
labor history, and sent to prison on
■ Ma y 29 > 1925.
After the arrest of Manlapit the!
strike collapsed,
Sentenced to from two to ten years
at hard labor, Manlapit served his
i minimum sentence and was eligible
parole January 5, 1927. Despite
the agitation in Manlapit's behalf
from all parts of the world and de
s PÜe denunciation of the frame up in
ever y newspaper in Honolulu the pa-1
role board refused Manlapit parole
until be agreed to leave the islands
an( l come to the United States,
Incidentally it was proved by the
Honolulu Bee that the members of
H 1 ® parole board were themselves
Imked up with the sugar interests,
es.
I
Manlapit was released only a few
months ago proceeding to Los Angel
He immediately became a domi
nant figure among the Filipinnos on
the Pacific coast with whose interests
he lost no time in identifying himself.
He began the organization of the Fll- !
iprno labor union of America of which !
he is now president.
For many years, even before leav
ing the Philippine Islands for Hawaii
Manlapit has been an ardent partici
pant in the movement for freeing the
Philippines from American rule. He
insists that the Filipino workers
not properly defend their
interests unless they take a leading
part in the movement for national in
dependence. In a general way, the
sentiment for independence is virtual
ly unanimous among the Filipino
P e °P le - What is needed is militant
stru ^£ le to achieve independence,
Feeling himself in accord with the
a
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economic
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Low Round Trip Fares to
The Pacific Northwest
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!
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-1
Low round-trip "Home Visitors" fares from all Great
Northern stations in Montana, and from Anaconda, to
Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, and Vancouver, B. C., as des
tinations. Tickets on sale December 15, 17, 21, and 27
only. Final return limit January 10, 1928. Continuous
passage. Travel luxuriously on the finest train in the
land—at no extra far
in the Pacific Northwest.
The New Oriental Limited
Through to Seattle, Tacoma, or Portland without change,
and with direct connection to and from Vancouver, B. C.
E. R. WHITE, Agent
Plentywood, Montana
J. F. Pewters
Assistant General Freight and Passenger Agent
Helena, Mont.
I
and spend the Holiday Season
LI
Great Northern
A Dependable Railway
:
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CAU TBJJCJ U T1ACTO&A
New Ford Cars For Sale
$593.00
. 603.00
. 654.00
1 New Model T Coupe.
1 New Model T Tudor Sedan
1 New Model T Fordor Sedan
1927 Models with Proxlin Finish,
Wood Wheels, Holley Vaporizer.
Will deliver these cars as far as 150 miles from
from Culbertson at these prices.
BILLY DONOHOE
FORD DEALER
Montana
Culbertson
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GO EAST NOW
Low Round Trip "Home Visitors" Fares
On the Greot Northern to St. Paid, Min
neapolis, Duluth, Chicago, Milwaukee,
Kansas City, St. Louis, Omaha, Des
Moines, Council Dluffs, and Sioux City,
Tickets on sale November 19, 21, 26, 29;
December 3, 6, 10, 13, 17, 20 and 27,
Final return UrnitMarch 1,1928. Liberal
stopover privileges.
Take this opportunity to travel luxuriously on
of the finest trains in the land—at no extra fare .
one
The New Oriental Limited
Through to Chicago ¥ r ithout Change
Call, write or phone for information
E.R. White, Agent
Plentywood, Mont., or
J. F. Pewters
Assistant General Freight and Passenger Agt.
Helena, Mont.
3
Æm Great Northern
A Dependable Railway
activities of the All-America Anti
Imperialist League, Manlapit became
member of that organization sever
weeks ago. The League now has
sections in eleven countries of Latin
America as well as in the United
States. Under the leadership of Pab
Manlapit it is believed that a very
strong section of the League will be
established in the Philippin Islands.
Plane Service for Parks
Great Falls, Dec. 1.—Daily airplane
service between Yellowstone national,
and Glacier national park, is planned
for the coming summer by the Na
tional Parks Scenic Airway of Bill
ings, according to V. R. Lucas.

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