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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, March 02, 1928, Image 3

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,
(Tri^y
and Religion—and Oil
Science
. CLIFFORD
r EARl-k A '
„ nI1 troubled waters has
That 0lL firt D a scientific prov
nothing el „ but in the recent ap
* r hc nom the problems of science
g'otion t0 t he three addresses
nâ r eligl ° n c«ndaN bv Dr. David I'.u
Jen I* 4 \ b' B. O., D. D., t .
f ene 0l- ;on ' • ' w é are in some aouot
g, • • ' fn ,P of the et feet, ro
the na I glorious vindication of
man)' and convictions tnai
S 0 " 5 i- withstood the onslaught
eolith . .inc method, bo otn
'7modern > c ien tific temperament
- of 3 m ° tuncrficial harangue, in
it but on,i un-cientifie. Otheis
tolerant itiv e convictions on one
h le# l P nther were left m mid-an,
cide or the f KC ience shaken and tne
ibe ^ oU f r eligion inadequately pie
°L jung troubled waters ot
cented- , e ligion are in these days
Science a'-" but the treatment of the
being cailT . )r oison, oil-expert, seems
subject b > t '| ie opposite effect.
to have na>* be sai( i that the address
? ' ,oU an( i Go«i ", while it wa
■âfx-hing a certain type oi
b ut 3 re . ,a ' an( i not science at all, wa.-^
philosop 11 ^ ^ convincing. Ihe ap*
interestir 1 » _ ßjhi e an d Evolution,
proacb to - ^ 0 ^ er two addresses
howe ver - ' j ( j ent weaknesses wmen
had ye '- be allowed to stand with
Tcomment.
rf-Tfirrt place, Dr. Dlson no
ln .Whited the spirit of the true
«■h £r f. e ; 'a .scientist is one who gives
observant
bk'
By
: to
r.a ve
It
on
if tn the study of
him 5 ® 111 ; n a given sphere and who
P* 1 ? 0 ! dassifv, explain and mampu
seeks to - • p roces ses and forces
ii covered. In view of all the ,
Vp endeavors to formulate a
' aCt • which shall reduce his obser- j
t0 law and principle. When-i
Ta l °- rew fact is discovered which,
nt* consistent with some previous
!■ then that theory is changed so
* harmonize with all the facts A
£ .dentist, then, cannot be any
H- _ but open-minded, tolerant ana
: b!e . Thomas Huxley s obserxd
*■ «non this point is pertinent; bei
Lé teaches in the highest and
strongest way the great tiuth which
is embodied in the Christian concep
tion of entire surrender to the will of
A scientist must sit down be
fore fact as a little child, prepared to
dive up every pre-conceived notion and
leady to follow humbly wherever it
shall lead him or he shall learn noth
Lr." .
\Ve were in great expectation at the
announcement that an eminent seien
tin would discuss Science and Re
ligion. We looked for an intelligent
and unbia.-ed examination of both
sides of the problem and a solution
which would be in harmony with the
accepted facts of both science and re
ligion. Instead, however, it was very
evident that the speaker had some
thing to sell, not oil, but a certain
type of 15th century theology w r hich
presents a view of the Bible that can
never be harmonized with the facts
of science. In defending that posi
tion, which is identical with that of
William Jennings Bryan, the find
ings of science which are obviously
out of harmony wdth such a position
were either ridiculed, ignored, or pass
ed by with superficial comment. We
looked for a discussion of the funda
mental issues involved but they were
everywhere avoided or obscured by
barrage of oratory. When a man
ha? a particular theological strong
hold he is trying to defend one can
hardly expect him to approach the
problems of science "ready to follow
humbly wherever fact shall lead him."
It is a common human weakness
cling to facts that support our per
sonal prejudices and to ignore those
that seem to be out of harmony with
ever
them. It is obvious that to be a sei- '
entist one must have an eye single
to truth, not partial truth, but com
plete truth. This was one of the dis
appointing features of the lectures on
the Bible and on Evolution. We wish
it were possible for some student of
science to present the evidence for
ti> e theory of evolution in a tolerant
and sympathetic
Altho the theory is by no means
established as scientific fact it may be
an avenue through which some day
new truth shall be established and
that without violence to the funda
mentals of religion. Rather than
pooh-pooh it we would do better to
honestly examine its evidences lest
We *u 6 ^ ouru * fating against truth.
The Church, in standing for tradi
t . lona ' interpretations of religion, has
fought against true science and found
toelf to be in the wrong. It was
Galileo, I believe, who was forced to
bow before an ecclesiastical council
and swear that his theory that the
«arth moved was heretical and un
f f' ^ j s sa id that as he rose to his
?** again he muttered under his
6rea » d° es mov e just the
s ame." Of course this council had
scripture passages to back up its con
vention that the earth did not move,
o prove that it did move would have
nrçatened the very foundations of re
gion as they interpreted it. It does
nf f °, ccur to modern apostles
traditionalism in religion that to
against present day advances in
^'gbt be a blind struggle
Winst truth. We cannot hope to
a solution of the problem until
omJT ^ ize sconce and religion
cnL« 6 ln f wo distinct and separate
RK P 16 scientist has no right
Hu f I rea lm of spiritual values.
■ 18 ,f° s tudy observable phe
us hnw iu Physical world, to tell
scribe operates, to de
cesses a intncate structure and pro
anv nk As a . sc ' en fist he cannot make
s Piritna^ erV ? tlons re £ ar ding God or
an emi Va ues - Napoleon once asked
scientist why he left God
manner.
we
John Deere Tractors
Van Brunt Drills
FOR SALE BY
J. O. JOHNSON
Medicine Lake, Montana
\
out of his books on science,
ply that he had no need of such
hypothesis was essentially correct.
To leave G od out of human affairs
is indeed a catastrophe and science
alone is woe fully inadequate in its
i n teipretation of the universe. Where
sc i ence leaves off is the place for re
ligion to begin. Religion has solid
groU nd upon which to stand in its af
fjnnation of moral and spiritual!
values , and 0 f the foundations of
a supie me Being, of whence and
w hither of human existence. But
w h en it steps over the line and begins
t0 dictate to science it is altogether
out of p i ace .
The key to the whole problem lies
in tbe interpretation of the Bible. If
j t i s a Book verbally inspired "with
uut any admixture of error for its
ma tter"; if it is a final and complete
ieve lation of all truth as the so-called
Fundamentalists insist then Dr.
Qlson's treatment of Science and Re
ii s j on was mos t admirable and
should all be apostles of Bryan. We
are com ing to see, however, that such
a v j ew 0 f the Bible is impossible and
that religion does not rest upon any
suc h foundation. Jesus, himself, in
speaking to his followers of the Old
Testament said that it was crude and
incomplete and that his interpretation
0 f re li^i on was far in advance of it.
The Bible is a book of religion and
not of science. The unique feature of
the fi rs t chapters of Genesis, for in
stance, is not the scientific data sup-1
p jj e( j bu t ratber the won d r0 us fact
His re
an
we
that hack 0 f a jj creation there is God.!
It nowbe re attempts an explanation I rn
0 f the proceS ses thru which God brot 1 ligj
t he wor jd into being. That is a mat-1 [33
ter f or science to reveal, in so far as uu
j s a bie. Whether or not we believe ,
j n the theory of evolution does not i ES
a ff ec t in any sense the contribution ran
0 f the book of Genesis. Even the j fosj
evolutionist, if he would know the | [xj
w ] 10 l e story, must go back and say "In j r^ri
! the beginning God . " 1 ^
One matter in the address on Sei- i $3
j ence aR d Evolution which carried con-(.R?
j siderable weight was the situation in !
j our universities and colleges where i OS
, the teaching of evolution apparently ! ££
j s destroying the religious faith of
hundreds of boys and girls, a serious i
situation we grant. We are not will- [#}
j n g to admit, however, that the fault rân
j s a n on the side of the scientist. To i
j be sure L e been at fault in teach
| jng material processes and refusing
; to look beyond for the Creator w'ho
j is back of all these processes. He has
i overstepped his rightful bounds in
! coming over to the fields of religion
an d philosophy and saying that a ! Si
j spiritual interpretation of the universe | [Ss
i s impossible. We should be careful
i to lay the blame on the scientist and ' 1
I not on his science. It is very encour- hîjS
aging to us who' believe in religion to
( note that even the scientists are corn
ing to see that there is something
| very real beyond this material uni
verse. A modern writer in the field
0 f religion has well stated the case;
"The danger that Naturalism, with
its elimination of God and Purpose
from the world, should establish it
self permanently as the proper philo
sophy of science, may be said to have
passed . . . and if one salient feature
of our time is the increasing applica
tion to religious problems of the
knowledge won by science, surely an
other is the increasing appreciation
a by scientific men of the spiritual
meaning latent in their physical
knowledge. Scientific experience, ful
ly interperted, means God ....
j On the other hand our boys and
j girls have gone to college with faith
j in the Bible as a scientific book, ver
to bally inspired, and without any pos
sibility of errors between its covers,
Ideas of God revealed in the book of
Genesis have been on a par with those
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77
in the gospels. It is simple enough
that such a religious faith cannot
stand in the face of science. When
student is faced with the problems
of geology, the records of millions of
years written in the rocks he cannot
accept that science and hold to his
belief that the world was created in
the year 4004 B. C. It was just such
a conflict in the past century between
science and an impossible interpreta
tion of religion that produced men like
Robert Ingersoll. The two could not
possibly stand together and in accept
ing one the other had to be rejected.
The solution of the whole problem
lies in an interpretation of religion
consistent with findings in other
realms of human knowledge. The es
sential message of Christianity is true
and if preachers will preach that
message instead of struggling" to «te
fend outworn dogmas and creeds the
world, even the scientists, will gladly
hear them.
•Xd
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DAKOTAN" WITH
LOS ANGELES FIRM
«
Graduates of Dakota Business
College, Fargo, are being employed
by Los Angeles firms at a great rate.
J. D. Hartman writes that he has a
fine position with the General Pe
troleum Corp. N. L. Peterson, new
bookkeeper for the First National
Trust & Savings Bank is the fifth
Dakotan" for that institution.
D. B.C. ACTUAL BUSINESS
training (copyrighted—unobtainable
elsewhere) prepares you for respon
sible positions no matter where you
Watch results. "Follow the
Spring term. Mar.
«4
KO.
» >
$ucce$$tui.
1-6. Write F. L. Watkins, Pres.,
S06 Front St., Fargo.
■a
TstahIbe rger
SANDWICHES
E JOHN ARTHUR STAHLBERG |
Ven Ay hed lots en plenty dough,
Dat HjaTmar Nilsson fake
He used to kom en say "Hah-lo!"
En slap me oh may backbone—so!
1 En ask to use may car a lo.t,
1 En kail me "svager", en such rot.
Dat sure bane bad mistake!
Author's note—"Svager" is pro
nounced svoegur, and means brother
in-law; "Sjalva fan" means the very
devil, and the nearest English pro
nunciation would be shell-vah fahn.
Men is pronounced as spelled and
means but. This information is given
to those who do not understand the
j Norwegian language, that they may
j better understand the above doggerel.)
_
13
0
Fairwecther Friendship
Men efter cash en car bane gone,
Dat doggone sheepskate bloke
Yoost yoomp arawnd laike sjalva fan,
En tal may neighbors "Dis har Yohn
Bane yoost a great big bum, bay yim!"
(Ay spose he tank ay bane laike him.)
Dat sure bane dam good yoke!
Men Ay fixed him! You bat Ay done!
Ay sure bane got his goat!
Befoie ve finished opp de fun
He bane von sorry son-of-a-gun!
De sir-kpon-tences bane laike dese:
Hp run fer Yoost is as a Pierce,
En lost bay yoost von vote!
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Having leased farm, will sell at Public Sale, at Joe
Wirtz place, 1 1-2 miles north and 1 mile west of Outlook, Mont,
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Sale
Starts
at 12
Sharp
Free
Lunch
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Farm Machinery
JÊemmm,
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1 Van Brunt drill, 10 ft. double disc
1 Moline Tandem Disc, 8 ft.
1 16-inch John Deere Sulky plow
1 Moline Gang Plow, 14 inch
1 8-ft. Deering Binder
1 Boss Harrow with cart, 26 ft.
3 Section Iron Harrow
1 5-ft. McCormick Mower
1 10-ft. Hay Rake
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■■
1 Deering Weber Wagon with
100 Bu. Tank
1 Truck Wagon and Hay Rack
1 Bob Sled, 6 ft. runners
1 Hand Cultivator
1 Two-Horse Cultivator
1 8-in. Burr Feed Grinder with
Ford Attachment
7
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1 democrat buggy
1
4 fT."
5 HEAD OF CATTLE
Young heifers coming fresh in
spring
Household Goods
1 Steward Range
1 Dining Room Table
1 Maytag Washing Machine
1 Economy King, Separator, size 16
1 25-gallon Iron Kettle
Many other articles to sell also.
mrmrrrr
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HAY
1 Stack of Oat Bundles
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FEED
400 Bushels Oats
60 Bushels of Cleaned Rye
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Horses
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HARNESS
1 set of crupper harness
3 Sets of Breeching Harness
8 Collars, all sizes
1
1 Black Gelding, 8 years old, weight 1400 lbs.
1 Gray Gelding, 8 years old, weight 1450 lbs.
1 Black Mare, 12 years old, weight 1400 lbs.
1 Bay Mare, 12 years old, weight 1300 lbs.
1 Black Mare, 12 years old, weight 1300 lbs.
1 Black mare, 11 years old, weight 1350 lbs.
1 Black Mare, 10 years old, weight 1250 lbs.
1 Bay mare, 7 years old, weight 1300 lbs.
1 Light Bay Mare, 7 years old, weight 1200 lbs.
AUTOMOBILE
Ford Touring, 1924 Model
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POTATOES
£
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BLACKSMITH OUTFIT
60 Bu. Potatoes
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Pigs
Turkeys
Chickens
Sheep
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TERMS STRICTLY CASH
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All Items Must Be Settled For Before Removal
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Mrs. Joe Wirtz, Owner
133
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Frank Koester, Clerk
OSD
R. W. Ruegsegger, Auctioneer
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Libby Exposes Mighty
Navy Replacement Fake
Says That Contention That 25 New Cruisers are Required
"Replace Snips INow in Use Fraudulent-Biff Navv and
Munition Men Fear Libby. y
Washington (FP) Answering f
the latest claim on the part of the big
navy advocates—that 25 new cruisers
required to "replace" ships now in
_by the United States—Frederick
J. Libby points out that this claim is
fraudulent.
Libby is executive secretary of the
National Council for Prevention of
War. He is the one opponent most
feared by the admirals and munitions
are
use
Rid yourself of "creeping ills." Put your body in
trim by cleaning up your blood from the slowing
down poisons poured into it by inactive kidneys,
liver and bowels. You may rely upon
the famous old Dutch National
Household Remedy—in use since
, 16&Ô. The original and genuine.
GÎÎAR©
YOUR
KIDNEYS
0
y
HAARLEM OIL
if f
Accept nu imitations
All Druggists 1 *irc« SLses
s
tçSj
men who are back of the $725,000,000
naval plan now before Congress.
Libby shows that the 22 old cruis
ers which are claimed to be in need
of immediate replacement have ac
tually been obsolete, under the Navy
Departments' own ruling, for the past
five years.
This is the crudest and most glar
ing bit of misinformation," says Lib
by, "that the Navy Department has
..
ever given either to the President or
to the general public. There are no
such cruisers in our navy. • • • These
22 cruisers were all of them in the
navy once. Some are 35 years old;
1 the newest are 20 years old. Why
j resurrect them today after scuttling
ithem? For one reason only—to try
j to save this part of the building pro
uÆs Set Sdthë
big navy group has found this intense
[ly unpopular
Libby shows that the British gov
ernment is likewise defending its
j
1
Reboring and Regrinding
We have installed a Reboring and Regrinding ma
chine. Bring in your motors and have them made
new. All work guaranteed, at reasonable prices.
Don't forget we can recharge your Ford Magneto
while you are in town shopping, with the latest Colpin
magneto charger.
like
Plentywood Auto Company
I
j
® IlCan big navy group charges the
Bril tsh with violating the spirit of
the Washington treaty. In view of
this mutual bad faith by the naval
men, Libby urges that another naval
conference be called—"for statesmen,
not admirals, to direct.
cruiser-building program as "merely
replacement," replacing small cruisers
with larger ones. Meanwhile the Am
79
Libby—Midas Company has spent
$250,0C0 on mine and mill develop
ment and mill is ready to run with
1 $400,000 ore blocked out.

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