OCR Interpretation


The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, June 29, 1928, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1928-06-29/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE THREE

THREE NEW NASH "400" MODELS
•>X<;
i
•a
The new Nash Ambassador on the
Advanced Six 130-inch wheelbase
chassis
PMC
■'vy<
i
w.
tmm
nKMy
m
M9
The new Nash Special Six
4-door sedan
Jàâiifimmmm
/>■**.
4 .
Left—The new Nash Standard Six
4-door sedan
W
Outstanding among the salient features of the new
Nash"'400" Series are twin ignition (twelve spark plugs
instead of sixj.high compression motors. Bohnalite alu
minum allov pistons with Invar Struts, famous Nash
■/-bearing crankshaft with hollow crankpins. centralized
chassis lubrication, hydraulic shock absorbers on all
models, and newly designed Salon bodies. The new
six-cylinder models, which are described as the finest
cars in Nash history, will be viewed by the public for
the first time on June 21st.
I
,
__ .
The Better Kt ' ,.P ..
Contest w°rk th f. Jr ■ . , *
jliss Vesta Hannen, «ist ic " ,
demonstration agent, has o n s a M
the past week m the Reserve, Rose
Valley anil Part C a g e
Demonstration uuo.. ,
The Reserve club met at the sch 1
house Thursday, June i,witn
Vilen as hostess. The fo g c
members enrolled their Kitchens m tm
contest: Mrs. I^Uis Horstman, Mr .
George Lund, Mrs R. A. Gunderson,
£• u FaSwotTVi-s Axel Christen
^ lars Amrvick and MNs
Martrirot Amrvick "
* l'a p Valiev clnh met at the
w of Mrs. T A. Hansen on Frt
dav, June 8 . The following ladies en
rolled their kitchens in the contest:
Mesdames C. A. Bomstedt, Geo. Over
bv, Olaf Vik, A. Tefre, D. Wigmore,
Wälder Rasmussen, O. V. Tolle, P.
Reiten, James Singleton and N. Peter
The East Coalridge Community dub
met at the home of Mrs. Ole Boe for
a picnic Sunday June 10. Those en
rolling their kitchens in the contest
were: Mesdames Henry Hoaven, Os
better kitchens
IMPROVEMENT CON
TEST WORK STARTS
son.
/St«**"' .
5}
Important
Features
• •
Three series
16 enclosed models
4 wheelbase lengths
Salon Bodies
Twin Ignition motor
Air Craft type spark plugs
High compression
Bohnalite aluminum pistons
i
ll
(Invar struts )
7-bearing crankshaft
(hollow crank pins)
Houdaille and Lovejoy shock
absorbers (exclusive Nash mounting )
Torsional vibration damper
New double drop frame
Bijur centralized chassis lubri
cation
One-piece Salon fenders
Gear vision front pillar posts
All exterior metalware chrome
plated over nickel
Shorter turning radius
Longer wheelbase
Easier steering
Body rubber insulated from
frame
Blflex-Nash bumpers and
bumperettes
e
r
f
L |J - " ii'r tsy /
s
Farmers Garage
M. E. HILL, Proprietor
Dealer
Montana
Pientywood
<«W*
car Melby, M. Ibsen, Edwin Dahl, Ole
Boe, M. A. Morken, Clara G. Jacob
'son, G. Larsen, Andrew Dahl, Chris I
Ibsen and Henry B. Syverud and P. C. |
Jensen. j
Miss Miriam Hawkins, home man- ;
agement specialist from the state col- j
age at Bozeman was present at each j
of the three meetings and discussed !
the armngement of the equipment in
the kitchen so as to save steps for
the housewife. Miss Hawkins says.
i"The Montana rural housewife spends
an average of 9 hours a day working
in her kitchen and trayels from 2 to
j 7 m ües in that time in carrying on her
daily kitchen work." In order to re
duce the amount 0 f ti me spent and the
nurrd)er of traveled each day
Miss Hawkins says, "Place the stove,
wor k cabinet, the cold storage and
water supp iy within a six foot radius
of each other
The Stehens enrolled will be scored
accordinff to a standard score card at
the beginning of the contest and again
at tbe c l° se °f the contest sometime
bis co ™ in f ^ ril î e \. Award « wi » then
Je made to the ladies who have made
the gr . eat tl im P rov ! meat m compan
son Wlth the a ™unt of money spent,
1 A series of meetings will be held
j taking up the following phases of
j kitchen improvement.
Meeting No. 1 —General arrange
i ment of floor plan and equipment,
j ivorking surface heights,
j No. 3—Water and drainage systems
! for the home.
No. 2—Built in equipment and
No. 4—Floor, wall and woodwork
table top and furniture finishes.
No. 5—Demonstration of commer
cial and home made equipment,
No, 6 —Inter-comunity tour to in
spect the improved kitchens,
Miss Miriam Hawkins, home man
agement specialist from the State Col
lege at Bozeman is spending a few
days in Pientywood assisting Miss
Vesta Hanson, Home Demonstration
Agent in the Kitchen Improvement
contest work that is being conducted
in Sheridan, Daniels and Roosevelt
counties.
Miss Vesta Hanson, district home
demonstration agent for Sheridan,
Daniels and Roosevelt counties, form
erly of Mount Vernon, Washington, is
now located in Pientywood.
Hanson will have office quarters with
the County Agent in the basement of
the library building.
working with the Home Demonstra
ti°n clubs and 4r-H Girls' Clubs in the
counties.
Tbe fjT st . work to be taken up will
be the Kitchen Improvement contest.
-
Miss
She will be
EASY WAY TO PRESERVE
CHERRIES
Fill glass jars with sound, clean
cherries; cover with syrup made of
one pound sugar (beet or cane) and
one quart water. Close jars; im
merse in boiling water, allowing one
inch of water over tops,
slowly 15 minutes,
stand 15 minutes, and set in cool
place.
Simmer
Remove, let
SUMMER CAMP FOR I
...Mn*
MALNUTRITIONS
___
Parents of children inw
„ ivmrp underweight win 1
xnmWul opportunitv ti b cSri 6 t^a
nu iron where thev ù-ni SC - ■
«5t and riU ga !T '.l!,
, delightful condition^ u y er K
^yfoe Camps wdl ,L S ' W ? en ,. f T'
u , ' thi s summpr^fn °fu ln
j r ; e hed chik'rpn " oi,ic 6 U ir'
M ' executive ' t sa , * ra ,,r'
TUa»t+oVia Tuberculosic a—!? t?- u u,
tn a,, mi mted these " «tv •
1 r month whirl?"* -n Tmtrori it
ÎJ *hJ food T! i WlU cov l r the
ran not m _"l e ,^ se ot pa 5*
* a ip nr iraniza ti nr, 1 this expense
i y, have si or if; ir } tbviclu '
ach J ll i r ® r \l Mn ai l d Wll i d u efra > r
ÎÎJ? is finanriîïfh* T ]} be . rc . u '
losis Assn. IS financing the admims
tration co?ts, which include a nurse,
irmp^t^imn^lnTLwSow/S
Kiwanis donated perma
nent camps, consisting of attractive
screened buildings with fireplaces and
large, open porches. At Camp Galla
tin, the American Legion is furnish
ing cots and tents. At Camp Sun
shine, at Epworth, Richland County,
the National Guard is furnishing cots
and tents. At Camp Cascade, at Nei
hart, the equipment of tents, cots,
dining hall and kitchen come as last
year, as a contribution from the Sev
en Day Adventists and Epworth
League of the Methodist church; Chil
dren from other counties than these
five will be admitted in a limited num
Already several
have made arrangements and the ap
plications of others will be consider
ed in the order in which they
ceived by the Montana Tuberculosis
Association."
her to th ecamps.
are re
* camps
must have their physical defects
rected before going to the camp, in
order that they may respond to the
sunshine treatment, since no child suf
fering from diseased tonsils, adenoids
or similar conditions can make the
cor
proper gam.
"In every community of Montana
there are children who would benefit
by living under the healthful condi
tions that will prevail in the Sunshine
Camps," said Mrs. Morse. "The sys
tem of recreation, rest, sunbaths, and
well planned nourishing meals will do
much to build up the under nourished
child who is always more susceptible
to disease, and will do much to
pre
vent the development of tuberculosis
and other infectious diseases. Gratify
ing results were obtained in our four
health camps of the last two years
and we know that equally as success
ful results will be obtained this year."
AGREEABLE FAMILY
Mrs. Prunepeddler to Mr. Pruneped
dler: "Who is building that shack on
the lot across the alley?"
Mr. Prunepeddler: "Looks like a
working stiff."
Mrs. Prunepeddler: "Well, by gad,
it's time we're getting out of this
place.
Mr. Prunepeddler: "I think so, our
rent is six months in arrears.
Shelby—New Baker No. 6 gusher
well flows 6,000 barrels a day.
e "" R T,r '"w
Fadeout of Low Wages
i
I
I
C. — (FP)—Low I
wages and unemployment are ruining ;
tbe , romanc e and adventure of the
northern -oldfields that have for
year - S i ll i red t . he dt y worker seeking
res P^ e f rom industrial slavery. With
a , fair chance of making a stak, and
Phssikility of making a "strike"
the »? ld miner ' s lo " el ï existence wls
a , tonic that lost none of its relish by
, knowledge that no one was direct
y ex Pl°iting him.
This * s now passing. The gold
seeker caricatured by Charlie Chaplin
m The Gold Push is falling within the
SC0D . e of capitalist development. Pros
Pccting parties with portable labora
tory and expert chemists and geolo
gists, sometimes with the aid of the
air P lane ' cover great areas and dis
Place an army of prospectors scatter
ed through the hills. Moreover thev
co the job accuratelv and efficiently.
| Since nannino- fnr freo „„in flip!
Creeto has become
Vancouver, B.
A NATfON-W/ßg
fMsrmmoM•
PAY CASH
PAY LESS
NO BILLS
TO DISTRESS
W helpful
STORE,
PAY LESS.
«EZMQRAI
I
9
it
quality—always at a saving
Pientywood, Mont.
>l
P
fS
O
3
0
0
mm
Out of "Shop," No "Sales
Here! You Shop Leisurely
n
Sommer Frocks
Cost Very Little Here
Service to the
Entire Country
Come in to
see these
charming silk
frocks for
yourself.
The fact that the public has encouraged us, year after
year, to extend our field of usefulness to new com
munities makes us realize more keenly that our business
is becoming more and more a Service to the entire
country.
In the last year the number of our stores has grown
to more than a thousand—1024 to be exact—and every
one of them is dedicated in good faith to the work of
providing greater economies for the home, for hu
manity.
To serve satisfactorily is the greatest achievement
of retail storekeeping. We strive to serve even more
with each
Printed
Patterns
The very
smart silk
prints are
included.
1
» 9.90
Many Colors
Pastel shades
,for hot w^a'.her
—b lack and
navy.
cS,.
Celanese Voile
Women's Suits
In One
Warm Days
Need Cool Shoes
Is a Smart Favorite
For Summery Frocks
As attractive in pattern as any
silk and as easily washed as
cotton — celanese voile is the
very modish, yet practical choice
for summer frocks. 39-40 inches
wide. Yard—
•Piece
Styles
Honey Beige kid is the ideal
warm weather shoe. Attractive
style and low
prices. This is an
excellent shoe for
general wear. The
cut-out trim
is cool.
Good - looking
suits that are
fashioned to swim
in, tool Plain and
fancy models --so
inexpensive I
tÆ/4 j
YmUJ
$1.19
A 22;
r 4
|V(
$2.98
$5.25
Jap Pongee
First Choice
t2 momme, all silk nat
ural pongee. Yard,
A Summer Frock
With Bonnet and Parasol
to Match
Men's Nainsook
Union Suits
Made of best quality
Nainsook, extra
full cut
throughout, and
excellently fin
ished. Will give
good wear as
well as being
cool and com
fortable in hot
weather. Has
back webbing
and is rein
forced with
double stitch
ing. Man-sized
value, at— *
39c
Every smart small miss of
1 to 4 will be wearing this
ensemble of printed dress,
bloomers, bonnet and para
sol to match for only
A Dainty Case
V
And a Delicate Powder
The sil
ver - finish
case
tains
lovely
smooth
powder
that "stays
98c
j
con
a
■Vi
1
Dainty Lingerie
Of Crepe dc Chine
Vr
r v
Lovely garments trimmed
with lacc and applique.
on.
98c
Single Compact . . . .49c
Double C~r" 7 m't . . .9Sc
$2.98
Majestic Belts
For Men and Boys
Rayon Undies
Boys' Favorite
The "Speed" Model
Bathing Suit
Lace Trimmed
Full grain cowhide lined
and stitched ; plain, 2-tone—
Pastel colored garments of
fine rayon for—
98c
98c
Real boys are sure to like '
this all wool suit—the shirt
is athletic style. Sizes 8
to 16 at our very reasonably
price.
Boys'Broadcloth Shirts
Exceptional Values
$1.98
Made just like dad's. Printed
broadcloth of excellent quality ; col
lar attached; many fancy patterns.

White and a variety of colors. Big
values that mothers will like; pattema
and styles that will please the boys.
The Collegiate
For Young Men
Excellent style in
Suits without being
extreme ; good tail
oring. Wool twist
fabrics and cassi
meres. New Greys,
Tans, fancies, nov
elties and mixtures,
at—
»
i'.urt
t
A\
few
•A
I
\
t\V
$24.75
.1. •.
Extra pants if dasirad. $5.90
mining has developed with its assemb - 1
ling of miners and machinery and the '
^attendant low wages and unemploy
ment. The annual summer trek of
sourdoughs seeking solitude and for
tune is succeeded by the migration of
mechanics and husky laborers seeking
J° b? at w hat wages they can get.
A t Steivart and Hyder, mining
towns near the Alaska boundary, 1000
men were unemployed last winter.
Enough credit was granted them to
exist till spring so that they start the
short busy season in debt and at low'
wages. While an orgy of speculation
tin mining stocks was manipulaed by
the promotor in Pacific coast cities 1
during the winter and fake jobs for |
miners were broadcasted, the men on
the job were unable to get out and
suffered dire distress. A special ap
peal is made by these workers, warn-!
1 i R K others who seek to escape the
monotony of city life that by joining
the anrual trek up north they are:
jumping out of the frying pan into)
! the fire,
Subscribe for the Producers News,
Montana Winter Wheat Crop
r . j - - Q -- AAn
estimated at ll,o/o,UUU Dll.
Helena,—A winter wheat crop of
11,875,000 bushels with a yield of 15.5
bushels per acre, is the forecast for
June, released this week by the divi
sion of crop and livestock estimates,
In announcing the estimates for
Montana's wheat crop, Jay G. Dia
mond, agricultural statistician, points
out the fact that these estimaes re
late to the date of June 1 since which
time moisture conditions in the state
have been improved by general show
ers. Mr. Diamond stated that unless
offset by unfavorable weather later in
June, the June rainfall to date should
result in some improvement of the
prospects for both winter and spring
wheat as well as manV of the other
crops reported to their office on the
first of June.
How did Miss Sharpe cut
Ethel,
her lip?
Clara :
marks I presume.
On one of her biting re-

xml | txt