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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, August 10, 1928, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

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review of the grain market
j
(
Weak —
Lower— Heavy
SS' '"'îl.Ââlï'
t.
jSin markets oun 'g the
Aug. . 4 '. aCC vieV5f the 1 Ü S Bvi
,.; a i ri market ij' K ,^mics Gen
L ,i of Apr.cultu.al_ l : conom^^n
r Ü:,iv favorable pi U ; . ß
St: ami l° wev , S, on
1 '■ i n " c "
Continues
. lin Market
l' ra . Generally . ,
I'rK es f New Wheat and Im
> Iove ?T*rospects for Spring Grain
eSÜJS*«:
in?
I lower foreign markets were
weakening factore. Pr'mi on
-bowed further declines as
of the previous
wheat contin
al*
*Hnoared with those
c °y bU t soft winter .. ;
v**' brlnar relatively large premi
uetl -Ifver the hard winter.
uni
favorable weathei
made favorable
generally
julv crops
,;'d private estimates at the
rC f August for winter wheat ami
01 * rin g grains were materially
-l,i over the official estimates
^ffir-t of July- If these estimates
ai " home out the supply of wheat
■■■ n; „ n will be but little smaller
t!US j,A year when the increased
,„vrr i- taken into account, while
of feed grains will be ma
t:: '- nv'larger than last year. Stocks
Khêat in the United States at the
of the season, July 1, were a
jg million bushels larger than last
l on when commercial mill stock»
were taken into account and totaled
annroximately 115 million bushels.
Condition of U. S. Spring Wheat
Spring wheat in the American
northwest is maturing mostly ahead
of the rust ami damage will be very
.light, according to reports to the U.
s Bureau of Plant Industry, unless
Ce weather turns unusually favorable
for rust revelopment. Stem rust is
widely distributed but is not generally
severe in the Red River valley of
Minnesota and North Dakota. There
is but little rust damage farther west
in North Dakota and still less
Montana. No appreciable damage,
except to very late fields, has occur
red in South Dakota and southern
Minnesota.
With
during
pro
fir
mo
are
than
close
bou
in
Foreign Markets
Weaker foreign markets reflected
generally favorable prospects abroad
and in Canada. Private estimates
now place the Canadian spring wheat
crop in the prairie provinces around
500 million bushels with no serious
rust damage in prospect and the crop
nearing harvest. This favorable out
look for the new crop is stimulating
the grain trade in Canada to dispose
of old crop stocks and marketing and
exports have been heavy during the
past month. Commercial grain stocks
in Canada were reduced about 22,000,
000 bushels during July but were still
about 28 million bushels larger at the
first of August than a year ago. (The
stocks of wheat in Europe are small
and demand for foreign wheat has
been fairly active. Rains are delay
ing harvests in Germany but the crop
is reported in generally good condi
tion. Yields are irregular in France
but the quality of the new wheat is
reported good and of heavy weight.
Itouth has done considerable damage
m Turkey and Asia Minor but tains
have recently relieved the situation in
Hungary. Winter crops in Russia are
poor, according to recent trade re
ports.
Cash Hard Winter Wheat
The movement of new hard winter
wheat in central western markets
continued unu»ually heavy, receipts at
Kansas City for July being the larg
est on record, totaling nearly 25,000
cars. The slow export demand at
the gulf has increased the movement
to the central western markets and
has caused congestion at some points.
Mill and elevator storage space is be
coming crowded, which has tended to
limit the demand and weaken the
market. Prices of hard winter wheat
declined 5 to 12 cents at Kansas City
where 12 per cent protein No. 2 hard
winter was quoted at 2c to 5c over
the Kansas City September price of
$1.09 1 * ; 12%% protein was quoted 5c
to 10c over, and 13 per cent 10c to 14c
over.
. Common protein types were bring
ln g about 2c under the September
price. Protein inspections on more
dlan 16,000 cars during July at Kan
sas City showed an average protein
content of 11.82 per cent. Hard win
ter prices were lowered at other mar
kets also with mills the principal
source of demand. Cash wheat was
I e V 2c lower at Wichita. No. i
anl whitei- was quoted at Omaha at
it.09 to $U6 and No. 2 hard at $1.08
$1-15. No. 2 hard winter was
ÏÏ mg , at Chica S0 at $1.23% to $1.24
p at Duluth at $1.15 to $1.25.
w- ardv als of new winter wheat at
r ,l n ! ap °li s from Montana and South
ota showed high protein and had
matw nc £ to l° wer premiums in that
fpr l ' ^. be e . x P°rt demand for win
mp r at * s S ^H limited although do
?* sbc quotations
line for .
WdfKi»°' week - Exporters were
Jiddmg $i >24 to $1.25% for No. 1
J, w ® ter delivered Texas gulf
shiiimn; 2 bard winter for August
^ nt ^ rom Atlantic seabord ports
at , at the loose of the week
mjotatf rp °° , at ^-36 compared with
£"'»»? of 81.13% for No. 3 Man
Sosafe si ioJ 01 . 63 , pound Argentine
and si'i t n" 4 ^ 0r Australian afloat
$1 - 41 for Indian wheat.
The ( a - h lS<,tt Winte r Wheat
fa H. SO t winter wheat market was
ttand L uwer at some points but de
w ^re k/' , a °ti v e and milling grades
Parable lngl ? g 25c to over com
®eceint ' I sof bard winter wheat,
iary-f .t* Louis were relatively
' j m ! 8 .® the southeastern
wer e -, r a ^° tJhio and Indiana
Winter J"' 6 buyers - No. 2 soft red
the do so aS ^? ted in that market at
Pared ^L° f oî he week at $ 1A2 com ~
hardwin? ta $L17 for N°- 2
w «re bei ter ' Receipts at Cincinnati
the m.X*: , cu . rren t requirements and
parket held firm with No. 2 soft
to l.$46 and No. 3
auAf t0 i ^ 1,4 1- No. 2 red winter
d * a oJ oledo at $L42
bushel d v at Chicago at $1.40
quotSi 0 *,-« d e ,l winter > garlicky,
M (1 ln Baltimore at $1.32Vs.
The fi, ( :f 8h S P rin .g Wheat
du rinp tv, 1 new , s Pring wheat arrived
protein t( /, t Week at Minneapolis and
higher thaD S f 0n 4 u arl J cars averaged
■easoii Til for * be ^ irg t arrivals last
ticaliy' the^ new ^ abl br ought prac
Ear
were more nearly
export business at the
Was
states
at
to
per
Heat CZ Same P rice as old
About i ^ aUse tbe limited receipts.
°f $1.140 over September price
northem aS l3 bein * bid f ° r N °* 1
crop
per cent protein for
!
V
10 day shipment, while spot quota
tions ranged from 27c to 32 cents
over the September price; 12 per cent
protein No. I dark northern w?«,
quoted at 13c to 17 c over the Sentem
'î'fiÂÆXÂ
*ara,t
j ™îï expor . t quotations. Very I
inir ^ffereTStL UrU "! S? eat was be '
eit , her at Minneapolis or j
Duluth and only one or two cars of
new amber durum had been received
Minneapolis at the close of the,
current week. This was combined
l
«fi waft ~
amber up to 13 per cent protein was!
quoted at 1c under to 20c over
September price at both Minneapoli!
and Duluth. American amber durum
was quoted at Genoa at $1.34 for Au
- ust shipment. j
While favorable weather has some
wnat improved prospects for rye ac-1
cording to trade estimates, the mar- 1
ket had independent strength and did !
not follow the decline in wheat. The
stock of old rye is very low and re
ceipts during the week were small al
'.hough some new crop grain began
to appear upon the market. The
Minneapolis market declined aboutU
cent and closer August 3 at 96S»c. :
Chicago September rye closed at
$1.017k. No, 2 rye was quoted at 3c
to 7c over Jhe September price at i
Minneapolis and at the September
price to 1c over at Chicago, Small
amounts were reported sold for ex
port with No. 2 quoted at $1.13 3-8 r
f.o.b. New York.
lt YE
CORN j
The corn market weakened slightly
as a result of continued favorable
weather following the closing out of '
the July contracts, the demand for
corn for the filling of which had brot
about unusually nigh premiums for
spot grain. Receipts were somewhat
smaller than last week's heavy move-'
aient which materially reduced the a
mount available for shipment at many
interior points. Stocks are relative-1
and are held 1
principally at Chicago. New crop de
liveries were especially weak in the
future markets but seaboard interests i
were reportd to b good buyers of
for December delivery. * Export
corn for last half of December ship-1
ment was quoted at the close of the i
week at 88%c f.o.b. New York and ;
sales estimated at around 400 0C0
bushels were reported. Cash prices
were 4c to 5c lower at most of thp
markets, No. 3 yellow b?taï quote' '
on August 3 at Chicago at $1.05
;i.06V 2 ; Minneapolis $1.04 to $1.05;
Kansas City 98c to 99c per bushel. !
No 2 yellow corn was quoted at St. j
Louis at $1.061/2 and at Omaha at 97c 1
to 98 cents per bushel.
OATS
corn
i
T-. , , !
he movement of new oats to cen-j
tral western markets increased and j
prices declined somewhat but the j
market shared in the strength of the
corn market and had a rather firm
undertone. '
Heavier receipts are expected as
threshing becomes more general, !
since threshing reports indicate some
what larger yields than expected
earlier in the season and private es- 1
timates at the first of August were
around 100 to 150 million bushels
greater than the July 1 official esli
mate, September oats declined IV 2 C
during the week and No. 3 white oat» I
was selling at the close of the market 1
on August 3, at Chicago at 401^ to
41% cents, Minneapolis 36% to 41%
cents and Kansas City 41 to 42 cents ;
per bushel.
being quoted, delivered group
points in Texas at 51 cents per bush
el compared with locally grown No. 2
red oats at 56 to 57 cents delivered
Texas common points.
BARLEY
Larger offerings of barley weaken
ed the market for the grain but there
No. 2 white oats
one
w
The Cabriolet , Body by Fisher
(UlLTfRAV SROUnvUlTRA MbW
and availabfe only to buyers of
î>©1W1a\C SIX
PRODUCT OF GENERAL MOTORS
In answer to the widespread demand for a low
priced six of ultra-smartness, all Pontiac Six
body types have been made available with,
special sport equipment.
Six wire wheels in attractive colors—two spares
with chrome-plated clamps cradled in fender
wells—a folding trunk rack... all are included
at a slight increase in price.
On no other six of comparable cost is this ultras
smart and ultra-new equipment obtainable .. *
Just as no other low-priced six provides the
inherent style advantages of Bodies by Fisher
and the performance superiorities of a 186 cu.
in engine with the G-M-R cylinder head. The
price is only $95 extra. Investigate this excep
tional "buy" today.
-, 1 ITT, *745: Sport Roadster. $745: Phaeton,
2 Door Sedan, extra); 4-Door Sedan, $8Z5:
*775: Cabriolet, S? 95 Sôldand All-American Six, $1045 to
Kart Landau Sedan, $87^0«*^ OaklandPontiac delivered
at minimum rate.
O. M DONALDSON, Dealer
Picntywoocl, Montana
]
Mute Talks After Ride
Ê A
imf
SL 3
1||||.
■L'A
«tOBflHlL.
lAvnocAwrefliHli^Hls 9H
G^'plFr
bov of^levcr^ ^
È « ? VT
s,s'£"aW«p
8 W * h * |
the-
.
was a iair iy acti.e demand from
maltsters and expuiteis which ib
sorbed the current receipts. Arrivais
of Iowa and Soutu Dakota bailey at
Milwauk ee were generally of good
iUabty ar ' d giaded principally special
N ° - 2> . Some of the receipts'at Min
ieapol , is were tough and stained but
threshed under favorable coudi
tlons showed good quality. Malt
f£ ers were ratber cautious' buyers in
that mar ket and were awaiting a
arger movement of new crop grain.
fr, nialtlng ty P es were selling at
* «i 08 ® of the wee k at Minneapolis
ÎV , 't c 75c ' Chicago 77c to 80c,
. u ! u t b '" c to 75c per hushel. Spe
V , -r °" 2 was quoted at Milwaukee
«I ,b " C ? nd at at 68 c to
P er bushel. No. 2 barley for ex
vi WaR q uoted at ^ 4 c f.o.b. New
° rk '
I"
m
FLAX
The flax market was weak, largely
m syna Pathy with other grains since
no material change in the general sit
Ua , n W 2 S re P°fted. Receipts of old
see( c 9 n Fjl? ued Hgbt .totaling only 11
i ar ?- j Minneapolis. September flax
de . clined $closing at $2.10% at
J?. mnea P°li s and $2.13 V 2 at Duluth,
iaX fee P ter nher delivery at Min
eapo • wa -= quoted at the Septem
^ hl 2 No ' 1 spot seed sold
tvJa Se P t . e . mber P r , lce to 4c over,
lhe r S entlae market
- 7, was
r ' in Ç u fv c ^, d by the slow demand
k" 1 both E 2 r ? pean and American
seed \ market f° r
1 * e , d A for Au S us t ship
nos AkS aTsiol tnf \ B Jf e *
^foment Ä ll
P f™ * a Vr 651 '? per busbe l- Ar
?^ ntine , se ® d August shipment
qnfnmp?^/' 1 fJ^ 6W \ ork at $1.83,
sÆn ^ the wee £. totaled 1,
k 90 ?? 0 ! 0 bushels ' of whlch 772 ' 000
^ S s reP ° r ' Cd destine<l the
to_
ci\/U a/ittm D rr>nwr
TlVE MEN RECEIVE IN
JURIES IN CAR SMASH
Wolf Point, Aug. 4.—Five_
miraculously escaped serious injury
when two cars collided head-on on the
Vida road 12 miles southeast of Wolf
Point Saturday. The engine of the
car driven by Ed. Johnson of Richey
hail adiusto r. cuid to ho fiomono/l
beyond repair, while the radiator and
fenders of that driven by A. E.
Schmidt, Wolf Point, is badly dam
aged.
Schmidt, climbing a hill, saw the
Johnson car appear at the top and
turned to the right. Johnson turned
to the left thinking Schmidt was not
going to turn out. Johnson sustained
a severe gash on his forehead and
minor cuts and bruises,
Burke had a bone broken in his hand
and received cuts about the face and
a bad gash on his leg, O .B. Hore
ford, a McCone county farmer, sus
men
Alfred
werejtained a gashed knee. Schmidt and
Buckley, a service man for the Holt
Combine Co,, escaped with bruises
and minor lascerations. The impact
of the cars turned the Johnson car
completely around.
The Producers News, $3 a year.
DrFraak Crane Says
G«»ville l> Kl'ife" S "l^own
£ some *° od
u ' eeless talkin , g ' he Says - j
Some of the essentials that he
mentions tor a good conversationalist
a« as follows:
Thp first condition of o-n^ tnlkinr
is clear, well-ordered thinking If
your thoughts are in confusion* vour
rr^ori«
sfeayrs3=
twT' ke advir* es a ^ e . nresome -.
L *Li is usimii ^ dvi ^ e costs
not . hm K and Ually WOrth what ll
C °^ S ' ... . I
D° n 't exaggerate, it i s easy to let!
your desires and feelings overcolor
your views< 9 lve the impression of
und erstatement rather than over
statement aml what y°u say will have
mcre effect .
. Keep your voice low. A low voice
* s not only an excellent thing in a
woman, as Shakespeare says, but it is
E° od for anybody. Many people are
SAYS PROHIBITION
LAW IS NOT SAME
Helena, Aug. 6.—"Much confusing
propaganda concerning the prohibi
tion law which is being initiated in
Montana this year has been circulat
ed," accordig to a statement by the
Rev. W .L. Wade, superintendent of
the Montana Anti-Saloon League.
"One of the reports published is
that the proposed law is identical to
the one repealed two years ago. In a
statement issued by the leader of the
wets it is set forth that there is to
be a state department for the en
forcement of he law.
"This is not true. No such depart
ment is provided for in the measure.
Only the federal law is to be enforc
ed and it provides that this is to be
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The
Kit" Is Here
U
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Now you can buy Mazda Lamps
in the new —
A
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I
*
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HANDY LAMP KIT


A
Î
1.. 100-watt lamp for kitchen
2 .60-watt lamps for dining room
2 50-watt lamps for general use
1 25-watt lamp for porch or basement
*
*



t
SIX MAZDA LAMPS—The New Inside Frosted
type to diffuse light, prevent glare and protect
eyesight. Packed in a handy carton for house
hold convenience, ready for you now! Com
?
*

*
I
plete $1.43.

ANY EMPLOYEE OF OUR COMPANY WILL
gladly take your order. These handy kits will
be sent to you immediately and the lamps will
be charged on your next month's lighting bill.
No need for you to make trips down town to
get lamps—you order—we deliver.
%
good lighting helps a lot to make a
house a home and these new lamps with their
soft, white light will surely please you. Inside
frosted lamps are more sturdy, give better
light, cost less, are easily cleaned and are at
i
tractive in appearance.
y
BUY MAZDA LAMPS NOW IN A HANDY
LAMP KIT FROM ANY EMPLOYEE OF
*
V
Montana-Dakota Power
Company

V
:
a
a»-IIgSfy'Vw^loud"'Th^d ££n
Do
the class of lightweights. Stories _
like reasoning or salt. They should
be very judicially intermingled and
it », easy to get too many of them.
Do not interrupt another. Wait
uietly for your turn to speak.
Don 't relate lengthy personal ex
b -- k äs
i - ' «vsa*
When you observe that your listener
does not wish to be convinced change
!the subject,
Speak clearly. Do not mumble,
Conversation is more than idle ex
ercise or'ornamental superfluity. Its
purpose is to keep the other* party
amused and interested. It is the wire
upon which runs the current of your
electric personality,
If you don't know how to talk,
learn. Devote a certain part of your
time to intelligent and diligent prac
tice in the art of small talk. It pays,
a
are
done through the local courts and
county officials who are regularly
elected.
"Alfred E. Smith, democratic presi
dential candidate and the delegates
to the democratic national convention
including W. H. Mahoney of Butte,
head of the wets' organization in
Montana, are pledged to an honest en
forcement of the laws putting into
effect the 18th amendment. Their
attitude toward prohibition and its
enforcement expressed since the con
vention, shows how little a platform
declaration means to them. It ap
pears it means no more to Maloney
than to Smith i nwhose candidacy he
is so deeply interested.
"In a previous statement we said
we were not expecteing organized op
position to the initiative measure in
asmuch as both parties had declared
in favor of prohibition law enofree
ment. Since a wet organization has
'again been started by Mr. Maloney
we are shown that a platform declar
ation means little to some of the del
egates to the convention that adopt
ed it at Houston,"
j
ja
.
_ :
roplar Graveling on the Poplar
Brockton stretch of the Roosevelt
highway is scheduled to begin this !
week. R. M. Carroll, superintendent
in charge for Stevens Brothers of St. \
Paul, who have tre contract, moved i
the equipment and crews in Monday :
and is now establishing a camp about
three and one-half miles east of here
rnd getting ready for work. Thev
plan to move the camp once during
the job.
A method known as trench-gravel- ;
ing is to be used on this stretch. In- j
stead of the base being left level it is I
hollowed out in the center, making a j
POPLAR-BROCKTON
ROAD BEING GRAVELED
A NATION WIDE
INSTITUTION
\
f
€€
quality—always at a saving
P erstywood, Mont.
99
Slut!
D)°
o
With Goods Right and Prices
Right You Can't Help but
Be Right in Buying Here
Lace and Rayon
Make Charming Under«
Have You
Received Your
Delivery
Truck Yet?
garments
A particularly
attractive as
sortment of ray
on underthlngi
is here for only
Evtry time you toy "tend It,
please" you are paying a few
cents towards a delivery truck
you will probably never receive.
Carrying your purchases home
elhninatet that expense, and we
are glad to past the saving am
to you be Lower Prices,
Think it over, please, and do•
tide which plan teems the more
sensible f
98c
For Every Day
Select This Silk and
Rayon Hose
A practical, durable hose
of a mixture of silk and ray
on especially appropriate for
houiewivei to wear around
home. Pair,
49c
Our Compass Work Shirt
Blue and White
Hickory Stripes
Staunch and very durable, cut
large and roomy, made with two
button-thru pockets with
metal buttons.
I
I
Here's a Work Shirt that
will stand the gaff of hard
work and long service. Mad«
to our own specifications and
low priced at—
111 »iiiiumi.'i'w
98c
T
9f
Pay-Day
U
Soft! Warm!
Overalls or Jumper
Union Made of (
2.20 blue denim.
Cut big and roomy
and is triple
stitched. Six bar
tacked pockets.
Overall or jumper
Blankets From
Our Stock
...
$3.98
and
$7.90
t
(
A
?
Wool mixed of especially
fine quality for $3.98—and
a handsome all wool blanket
for $7.90.
at—
1
vi
$1.29
%
Silk and Rayon
1 mm
Mercerized
Full-FaskioMd
Hose for Misses
A practical ribbed hose fa*
summertime. Pair
25c
V
The ehoiet o t msay wo*
«*0 for general wear.
98c
AnExeptional Value!
BroadelotK
*
?
V
Î
J
f
Hi
i
Fancy patterns that are
unusual and different —
mostly confined to our
Stores; also Plain White.
All excellent quality, 100x60
count and all in the popular Collar
Attached Style. Cut full and roomy,
It will pay you to take advantage ol
this most exceptional value. Besides the
fancies and plain whites there arc Plain
Blue, Tan and Grey, also Collar-Attached.
7 lir.H VTvî/f j
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PAGE THREE
bed which holds the gravel to the
center,
Two courses of gravel will be us
ed. The o«se course will consist of
layer of 1% inch gravel, 4 inches
in. depth. This will be covered by a
4-inch layer of %-incb gravel.
The graveling is expected to be
finished by October 1. It is said that
the grade will be In a bad condition
ln places while it is being worked but
that it will be passable at all times,
?. not an a, \S el that brought your
11? " a a tin , , . .
. Wel |* 1 . heard da ^ d >' complaining
abo V* the size of the bill, and angels
don 1 ^ a ' v bills '
her?"
Doctor;
How do you know it w>as a stork
Mr. Newlywed:
tell me at once—
"Please, doctor,
it a him or a
"It's a them."

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