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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, September 21, 1928, Image 1

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NEWS
LlBER' lY
THE PRODUCERS
NEWS GOES INTO
EVERY HOME IN
SHERIDAN COUNTY
i
NOT
V 1
IS
down
handed
from ABOVE
feti»—
XiTNo. 25.
A PAPER OF THE PEOPLE. FOR THE PEOPLE. BY THE PEOPLE
_PLENTYWOOD, MONTANA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1928.
Sub. Rates: IÄ. »|«
year
year
volume
Entered as Second Class Matter, October IS, 1912, at U»# Poet
office at Plentywood, Montana, Under the Act of March I, 127t
R COMPANY AFTER DIXON'S SCALP
•il
*
400 Dead in Hurricane Toil in Palm Beach Coast Region
*
100,000 ARE HOMELESS IN PORTO
RICO; DISASTER IS WORST EVER
West Palm Beach Is Placed Under Martial Law—Wind
Reached Velocity 125 Miles an Hour—President Coolidge
Makes Appeal for Aid.
Reports of destruciton in life and property mount in hurn
eme's wake along lower Florida east coast. Porto Rico, early
victim of the storm, fears a toll of 1,000 dead, with records far
from complete; and 700,000 homeless. The loss of life in French
West Indies was set at 300 in official dispatches to Paris.
Palm Beach, largest city in affected area, believed to
West .
Ixmie brunt oi storm, with business district badly battered
and town under military rule. Food problem here described
serious and appeals made for doctors, nurses and supplies.
Local newspapermen and Red Cross officials say city harder
hit than Miami in 1926. Hundreds of refugees reported huddled
in temporary quarters.
Public service facilities and power lines disrupted
as
over area:
extending lou miles as far söuth as Fort Lauderdale and as far
north ns Fort Pierce. Trains in storm sector unreported,
first i epoi ts from Bahamas by radio through Miami and New
Orleans said no fatalities at Nassau, the colonial capital, but
»ere property damage.
President ( oulidge appeals to American public to contribute to
lied Cross relief U nd for Porto Rico and Virgin Islands sufferers
The death toll in the Lesser Antilles wsa reported as follows
lioiiserrat (British) 25; St. Croix (U. S.) 6; Martinique
(French) 3.
Thirteen were killed on Nevis Island and six on St. Kitts, both
I Uritish possessions.
se
BLOOD POISON KILLS
MIGRATORY WORKER
Cla»tnce Milford, who came to
Sheridan county to work in the har
vest fields from his home in Wiscon
sin and who was employed in the
Raymond country, died Wednesday as
the result of blood poison and pneu
monia.
The young man, who was about 21
years of age, had an infection of the
lip hut did not consider it serious un
til the poison had circulated through
hi' entire body. He was brought to
the Sheridan Memorial Hospital apd
everything possible done to save his
j hfe but he passed away i
The relatives of the dead
notified and his mother and a bro
ther arrived Thursday to take charge
[ of the body which will be taken back
to Wisconsin todav (Friday) for in
terment.
I Ben Knutson, of Douglas, N. D.,
It ^'ed in Plentywood Friday to look
I of or his farming interests near Mc
■ tlroy, Ben is one of the homestead -
» ers m the McElroy country.
in a few
davs.
man were
Independent Ticket Is Fded for
County Offices at General Election
' M ! es Selected by Fanners and Workers at Convention
p ^ m August Filed Last Week—Strong Campaign Will
e in the Fall Over the Entire County.
th "'ululates ru nning on the Independen tTicket indorsed b y
the c lU Tvf aiK * wor kers of Sheridan county filed for office at
thoiuu! i louse wee k and plans have been perfected for a
—campaign over the çounty so that every voter may
® CAMPAIGNERS
WT PLENTYWOOD
:
I Tï — ■
^ al ,° ney ^ F - E. Parks,
Anti.p ro u:kf f . su P e rintendent of the
which w blt i on so «ety of Montana
i ^st tt»» arge of tlle campaign
1 ^ive n 1PQ .,* lroi>ose( l prohibition ini
toyg in are spending a few
I interf«t nda - n count V this week in
! P t} T campaign. .
kd the u 1 arks organized and
*ohibitio?Vï a î re Pealed the state
they irc ta » two y ears a &°
TheV J ? d sea soned campaign
ed wortril! as enthusiastic and
Maloney 5* as tw ° years ago.
■ J*« a deipVn/°r mer mayor of Butte,
^1 conyp^r the democratic na
) oririnai 0 \r f °* r years ag0 and
I Wu M °ntana-for-Al-Smith
t Their Z* bo °ster.
I t eaS 4 kenerary takes them
I * <ïreTri4 e YeUowstone
1 SHOT
I jH«y, xvho t,- ,To}m son of north
I n/Jep ThurcH., ap accidently shot
I kë Johnson 3 'i. ast week one
■ t ^ with a i n children who was pTay
■ botgun, was able
affpr° v ^ me Thursday
" *• spent a week
-
I
C. A. BORNSTEDT WILL
HOLD AUCTION SALE
An unusually large sale of farm
machinery, including large and small
..
farm implements, tractors, etc., will
be held at the C. A. Bornstedt farm
five miles straight west of Reserve
and 15 miles straight south of Plen
tywood on Wednesday, September 26. an
Mr. Bornstedt has sold his farm and a
is now disposing of his equipment
which is all in first class condition. Yf
For further information attention is
directed to his ad on page 6 of this a
issue of the Producers News.
en
Teachers' Reception at Cath
olic Church Parlors Sept. 28
A reception will be held at the Ca
tholic church parlors in honor of the
Plentywood school faculty Friday
evening, September 28. The public is
cordially invited and urged to attend
this "get-together" meeting and meet
the old an4 new teachers. A com
mittee will serve lunch and other en
tertainment will be furnished. The
evening's doings will commence at
eight o'clock.
ed a reputation for honesty and in
tegrity in their home communties
and who have the interests of the
taxpayers at heart.
Following are the names of the
candidates and the office for which
they were drafted by the fanners'
and workers' convention August 11:
of
in
of
For State Representative—
(Vote for Two)
Robert Larson, Dagmar.
Nels Sunsted, Antelope.
For County Commissioner—
A. N. Wanbel Dooley.
For Clerk and Recorder—
Niels Madsen, Coalridge.
For Sheriff—
Rodney Salisbury, Raymond.
For Treasurer— ^ .
Charles Lundeen, Outlook.
For Clerk of Court—
Walter J. Bye, Comertown.
For County Assessor—
George S. Bell, Dagmar.
For County Attorney— _,
A. C. Erickson, Plentywood.
For Superintendent of Schools—
Ida Newlon, Archer.
F°r E Hi u, Plentywood.
For County Surveyor—
HANS RASMUSSEN, Dagmar.
For Public Administrator—
H. Shirtliff, Plentywood.
4
Marie Hareland
Princess

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r
MARIE HARELAND
Princess of Sheridan County, Wh.)
Goes to Helena to represent This
County at the State Fair
September 24-20
Two nrairie fires were started by
^° Pairie lires were started oy
7
lightning last luesday evening in an
electrical stoim north and east of
7
i
I
Another fire at practically the same
time was started by lightning two
miles east of Raymond. The fire was
stopped before it did a great deal of
damage but Erick Melgaard lost
SIX-PASSENGER PLANE !
V1SITS PLENTYWOOD
!
Raymond. . • „T
Th . e largest fixe was on the Canadi
s * de nor tb of Raymond and burned |
territory estimated at 12 miles long,
seven mues wide. Many farme is
ere burned out by the onrushmg
flames, wheat fields were destroyed ,
d . a ar Jp ®^P anse °f prame lay |
black as the flames were hi ought.
under control near the boundary line, i
The fire fighters did valiant work in 1
finally stopping the fire which, driv- i
by a high wind swept two quaran- j
tines.
some wheat.
Jack Lowry of Des Moines, la., i
ÂÆ
last Monday, in his Stinson-Detroiter,
six passenger monoplane. After dem- j
onstrating his machine to The people |
of this city he, together with Francis j
Huebner of the Westland Service
station flew to Dooley and Westby. |
-This is the largest airplane that i
has visited Plentywood and was the
object of much admiration by those
who had the opportunity to look the
machine over.
^s'of^ice^ind^cate^^ery
SfÄrfSiÄÄ
th e fall ?'^ n 'inTh e e n m6 er g eLr 0 ai
ters regist Tuesday of
election \ • » registration stood at
fus week the regiresult
f'l 6 ° in ^Tv. Mr. ÄdÄ
lx * v.« wL« r *triOration will
that he - wherTthe last day
^ inassed and l
d £ y , . «ride of the registered vo
geek is made of the registered vo
REGISTRATION WHl
REACH OVER 4,000
Outlook and Dagmar to Hold Community Fairs;
Exhibits Will Later Compete for Cup at Plentywood
The American Legion post of Out
look Montana is sponsoring a com
raunity fair which will be held in that
town on October 6. The businessmen
together with the American Legion
organization are contributing to a
fund in order that prizes may be
awarded for the different entries that
will be made. The premium list for
the Outlook Community Fair will be
similar to that of the Sheridan county j
fair which will be held in Plenty
wood on October 10-11-12. The agri
cultural exhibit that will be on dis
play at the Outlook fair will be brot
to the county fair and displayed as a
community exhibit in competition
with similar exhibits from other com
munities. A silver loving cup will be
awarded at the Sheridan county fair
for the best community 'exhibit. This
Wins Coveted Honor of
of Sheridan County
*
Glow Krebsbach in Second
Place With 282,430—Car
ol Hoeck Third — Con
testants Well Repaid.
SPIRITED CONTEST ENDS
IN SPECTACULAR FINISH
Maiie Hareland was declared
Princess of Sheridan County by the
manager and judges after counting
the votes Thursday evening, ending
ever "hekT in'the "bl
^eMeridar C ortr i S , p t ?inS;!f
at the state fair, the young ladies
have carried on an energetic though
friendly contest and while only one
could win the high honors those in
second and third position will reap
a substantial reward in gold for their
efforts.
After the counting of the votes
Dan Olson, of the Producers News
invited the manager of the contest
and the judges together with the con
testants to a spread at West's Cafe.
During the serving of the repast'
Mr. Olson arose and thanked the
! manager of the contest and the judg
es and the contestants for their ef
forts in making this one of the best
events of its kind ever held in Shcri
d an county and offered a toast to the
Princess of Sheridan county.
Manager Carl Bull also thanked the
judges and contestants for their co
?
I operation and gave a toast to the
1 Princess of Sheridan County ia which
, .
bp Quecn ^ Mon | ana and that he
bo d ^ wovdd he able to bring
this honor to Sheridan county.
_
A III D A \T17 D AWHITC
/«Aill « DÄllüiiu l
.
CEniPli CinAAfl IN
OEiUUilL «pllljl/UU Hi
_ . is
HÄVI irHT H0i H P
UÜ 1 Liull i I1UL1/UI
_ ,, , , .v„ ra v, XT n
Robbers entered the Za 1, N. .
bank last Thursday afternoon, held
ùp the cashier and got away with
over $10,000 in currency and si ve .
Word of the robbery was bioadcas ^
shortly after the crime was commit-j b
ted and Sheriff Salisbury had all
road guarded can |* n S mto
Ä b a ut ro ' u h t e e Sng Toward P Minot
Three men are said to have staged
the bank robbery and are said o
have been driving a black car.
:
v _ •
Carl Fink Loses Team of Horses,
Harness *and Oats When Barn Is 1
Destroyed North of Raymond—
Chidren Playing With Matches Is
Cause of Conflagration.
BARN AND CONTENTS
mil/ vVlU U U
BURN AT RAYMOND
Tuesday afternoon about 4 o'clock
the bam of Carl Fink, who lives one
mile north of Raymond, was burned
to the ground.
Several horses were in the bam at
the time of the fire but Mrs. Fink
managed to save three horses but was
unable to get out a fine team which
ajM^ontaineT'l^setTo^haniel.s^and
mf hu,,dr â,îr?w, o h , e r ts which
^eföe'is said to hive been cans
ed by small children playing with
1 matches and who did ,not realize the
of their striking matches un
til the bam was a roaring furnace,
Mr. Fink was not at home at the
time being away on business,
The loss is a severe one to Mr.
Fink as there was no insurance on
^ gtnicture or C0Tlt ents.
undoubtedly is creating a great deal j
of interest throughout the county as i
several have already made réserva- 1
tios for space in the Farmer Labor
Temple to display a community ex
hibit
-
Dammar Fair
u *
Arrangements have been made in
the village of Dagmar to stage a
community fair on Saturday, Oct. 6,
which will be held in the village of
Dagmar. .. ,
Prize ribbons will be offered for
exhibits in all classes of agriculture
produce, women's work such as cook
ing sewing, baking, canning, etc.
. Cash prizes will be paid for the
outstanding exhibits in boy's and
girls' club work as it is the opinion
.i
X
Standings of
Contestants I
£ FINAL COUNT
Thursday, 10:00 p. m. |
?
V
I
*
*
t
i %
.*♦
*
***** Hareland -300.9S0 I
Glow Krebsbach 282,450 %
*j* r' 1 U I 1 Cn QCn 4
* Larol rioecK . loU,yï)U v
Y X
■> Signe Bentesen .. 47,900 ❖
•> ~
X Margaret Gosper 1,200 4
0
|
j
Y
V*
V
t
i
V
j -were
X
i
Helen Reuter ....
900 \
?
X
FAIR PROMISES A
GREATER DISPLAY
THAN EVE BEFORE
j The fair committees have been busy
the past week and are meeting ^vith
greater success than anticipated, "he
businessmen of Plentywood have en
into the spirit of the Sheridan
county fair and are helping the fair
along with generous contributions.
Every indication points to the most
successful fair in Hie history of the
county. Other fairs held over the
state are reporting phenomenal sue
with large crowds and Sheridan
going to keep up the record al
y established.
The Stock Demonstration train is
creating much interest among the
farmers of the county and one of the
crowds eV er in Plentywood is
forecasted for October 11 with fair
weather cond i t i 0 ns. The train is
traveling over the entire state and
u g e crowds are being predicted to
pre sent when the train visits the
^ q{ ^ state>
The program and exhibition is for
°l stimulating intent in
pected - to come from the dem onstra
train in the way of better live
stock
A further list of premiums is be
ing published this week in the Pro
ducers News making one of the best
lists of premiums ever offered at a
fai rin this county.
The fair board urges every one to
make an entry of some kind at the
fair. They are requesting the farm
ers, both men and women, to prepare
Dmir exhibits iiow and use great care
ln securing the finest specimens in
theîr division.
FREE TEMPLE DANCE
DREW LARGE CROWD
The first annual free dance given
by the hoard of directors and manage
ment of the Farmer-Labor Temple in
Plentywood last Saturday night was
a huge success.
A large crowd attended from over
Sheridan county and everyone enjoy
ed the fine music and excellent danc
ing floor.
Enjoyable events of this kind will
be a regular feature each year.
The residence of Myrtle Donaldson
is being remodeled this week and is
being made strictly modem.
of the directors of the Dagmar Corn
munity Fair that boy's and girl's
club work should be encouraged more
throughout the county, therefore cash
prizes will be paid in this department
The department in which a great
deal of interest is centered is the
poultry department. Considerable
terest is shown through out all see
tions of the county in more and bet
ter breeding stock in all classes
poultry and it is expected that a cred
itable showing will be made at this
fair on October 6.
A committee will be appointed
take all outstanding exhibits in from
the Dagmar Pair and arrange them
a community display booth at
Sheridan County Fair which will
held in Plentywood on October 10-11
12.
FORMER CLARK PLANT PRINTS
LITERATURE BOOSTING WHEELER
Doesn't Want Governor Who Refused to Bow to Dictates
of Big Company In Butte Erickson's Family Supporting
Hoover—Newspaper War Creates Great Interest.
By Pat Wallace
•'Take the hoops off the barrel and do everything possible to
defeat Dixon. We don't want that
Ion," was the order given at Swan Lake to his viceroy on the
sixth floor by one of the copper overloards of Montana before
lie departed for the east. There was bitterness in his voice as
iie referred to the Governor who, for four years, refused to bow
to the dictates of the big com-*
pany in Butte and tried to give
the people of the state an honest
administration.
in Washing
ed despite the fact that the heavy
democratic strongholds cast a heavy
vote in the primary and that the
farmers, who compose the majority
of the Dixon progressive republicans,
were busy when the election took
place. It is also pointed out that the
farmer-labor vote this time will go
mostly to Dixon and Rankin. Dixon
is expected to carry such democratic
strongholds as Silver Bow and Cas
cade where there is much opposjtion
to Wheeler because of his vote in fa
vor of the World court and his work
Company Print Shop Gets Busy
A few days later the Butte Miner
print shop which was just then
wrenched from the grasp of Will
Clark by the A. C. M. was set to
work on the biggest print job of the
44year. The best looking pictures of
the Hon. B. K. Wheeler, who served
the interests of the Montana Power
Company so well in Washington,
set in forms and the presses of in behalf of the Flathead bill spon
began to sored by the Montana Power Co.
the "Montana Standard
creak and groan as tons of the Rankin has the strong support of the
Wheeler boosting literature began to
roll off. _ No expense was spared in
printing .and the Wheeler cards,
which are soon to decorate every
dead wall in the state will appear in
as many colors and patterns ^s the
junior senator's past political affilia
tions, but will be more pleasing to
the eye.
Erickson's Family Supports Hoover
A juicy piece of news which has
been carefuly suppressed by the Mon
tant- newspapers leaded out in Los t
Angeles a few clays ago. Around
the cloakrooms of the statehouse and
the Placer lobby there has been rauf- 1
fled comment on the fact that the
Governor's family favored the candi
dacy of Herbert Hoover. The Gov- 1
ernor himself was a strong supporter 1
of Senator Walsh and against Smith !
before the Houston convention. It !
now develops, according to a news i
story published in the Los Angeles |
Examiner of Sept. 8, that the son and
daughter of the governor are strong
supporters of Mr. Hoover and that
tbey are starting back to Montana in
company of a man who is to do iin
portant work in this state for the ex-1
secretary of commerce.
Both Sides Confident
In the headquarters of both parties
confidence is expressed. The republi
cans contend, however, that the pri
mf»ry election showed 20,000 more re-1
publican votes cast than were cast in
file democratic column. This happen
Sheridan County Leads State
In Wheat Production Estimate
4,598,000 Bushels of Wheat Places This County at Hea J of
The List in Montana—Teton County Ranks Second—Es
timate of Northeastern Montana Wheat Crop Is Given.
Helena, Sept. 21.—County estimates of 1928 spring wheat pro
duction based upon July estimates of acreage for harvest and
September 1 estimates of probable yield per acre from crop re
porters in Montana show many shifts as between counties this
year compared with 1927, according*
to J. C. Diamond, agricultural statis
tician in charge of the crop reporting
service in Montana.
Sheridan county with a crop ex
pected to reach 4,598,000 bushels has
beaten Hill for first place this year
and is closely followed by Teton
county with an estimated crop of 4,
368,000 bushels. Hill county with 3,
996,000 bushels this year is in third
place where as last year with a total
of 4,462,000 bushels it led the state.
The production of 4,698,000 bushels
in Sheridan set a new record for the
production of spring wheat in any
county in any year. Valley county
takes fourth place this year with 3,
960,000 bushels followed by Roose
velt with 3,885,000 bushels,
teau with 3,780,000 bushels and Dan
iels with 3,417,000 bushels,
closeness of the seven counties in the
1928 ranking as estimated from avail
able data to date may result in some
shifts in rank in the December final
estimates.
In 1927 the seven leading spring
wheat counties in order were Hill,
Sheridan, Chouteau, Teton, Fergus,
Daniels and Valley.
Two districts, north central (eight
counties) and northeastern (nve
counties). will together have about
five million bushels more in 1928
than last year. All other districts
of the state indicate less spring
wheat with a drop of nearly three
million bushels in central Montana
(11 counties). In this latter district
there was a strong shift to winter
wheat acreage this year but a poor
(Continued on paxe ElgrhO
Chou
The
of
to
in
be
(Continued on Uaat I'a^e)
BENJAMIN GITLOW
WILL SPEAK HERE
Benjamin Gitlow, candidate for the
vice presidency of the United States
scheduled to hold a rnceLiug at the
Farmer Labor Temple in this city
Monday, September £4 at 8:00 p, ra
.It is expected that a large crowd
will be present to hear this brilliant
speaker who has at his finger tips
data on world events that will sur
prise the average citizen. Having fol
lowed the working class movement
for many years and studied the cause
and result of the diifeient events
which have made living conditions so
uncertain for the working man and
bis family, he is in a position to dis
cuss vital questions in an able man
ner -
Every citizen of Plentywood an,d
vicinity has been invited by Mr. Git
low to be present at his meeting and
hear his side of the political events
of the day, no matter what political
beliefs he or she may have. All he
asks is that everyone come, with an
open mind and reason with him on the
,vit^l questions that confront the pro
during class today.
FOOTBALL SEASON
OPENS IN PÎÏWOOD
The first home game of the high
school football season will be played
on the Herald field Sat., Sept. 29 at
3:00 p. m. The opposing team at this
time will be Sidney high school. The
support of the entire community is
needed to make this sport a success
and for that reason we would be
pleased to see a large attendance at
the first game of the season. The
year's schedule is to be found in this
column and it would be well to save
it for future reference.
Season tickets will be on sale next
week by students. It costs approxi
mately $260 to have a football team
each fall and all can realize this can
not he handled successfully without
the support of the community. The
games will be good ones and you will
get your money's worth. The price
of the season tickets will be: Grade
children 50c. high school pupils 76c
and adults $1.60. This entitles the
holder to admission to four games.
Single admission will be 25 cents and
50 cents.
Following is the schedule:
Sept. 22, Plentywood at Will ist on.
Sept. 29, Sidney at Plentywood.
Oct. 6. Plentywood at Crosby.
Oct. 13. Srobey at Plentywood.
Oct. 20, Poplar at Plentywood.
Oct. 27. Plentywood at Scobey .
Nov. 8, Crosby at Plentywood.

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