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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, January 18, 1929, Image 6

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CHEVROLET PRODUC
TION DURING 1928
REACHED 1,200,000
Detroit, Jan. 14.—With thousands
of the new Chevrolet sixes daily be
ing placed in the hands of owners, the
Chevrolet Motor Company announced
officially here Saturday that procluc
tion for the first ten and a half
months of 1928 equalled 1,200,000
units. This figure, it was said, repre
sented an increase of 180,000 units
over 1927, the best previous year.
Month atter month of last year
found Chevrolet shattering all former
production marks. Its all time record
for monthly output occurred in May,
when 140,775 units were produced.
May stood out in the Chevrolet cal
endar also because it included the
greatest single day's output in the
company's 16 years of history. 7,075
cars and trucks, completely finished,
rolled off Chevrolet assembly lines on
May 28.
Coincident with the announcement
of 1929 production figures, Chevro
let officials at the New York Automo-'
bile Show last week, were viewing
with interest the continued enthusiasm
that the crowds bestowed on the new
salient tributes paid Chevrolet by vis
iting automobile men at the show in
volved the company's remarkable evo
lution from four cylinder to six cylin
der production in the short space of a
sixes. Several ranking officials reit
erated the statement made a few
weeks ago by W. S. Knudsen, presi
dent, that 1929 production would equal
at least 1,250,CCO units. One of the
few weeks. Today all nine of Chevro- ;
let's assembly plants are rapidly ad- ;
justing themselves to take care of the
as many
years the sales department cf Chev-,'will
rolet at this time is sponsoring "its
annual series of nation-wide sales'
meetings. The first of the series,
which will be extended to include 35
cities, opened yesterday in New York,
Three crews, each composed of five
men, all factory executives, will con
duct the meetings. It is the purpose
of the meetings to enable the Chevro
let dealer organization, numbering
over 10,000 dealers, to hear from the
lips of the company's sales heads the
complete sales program,
peak schedules.
For the fourth time in
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We now cover
DUNLOP
TIRES
with this
SVRET\
ROND
O tire guarantee ever offered
can compare with this new
Surety Bond, backed by Dunlop
AND the American Surety Com
pany.
It is blunt. It says:"Your tire will
run perfectly for 12 months or we
stand the gaff."
No matter whether failure is due
to accident, or collision, or blow
out, or misalignment, or stone
bruise, or road-cuts, or rim-smash,
or side-wall injuries, or tube
pinching, or valve-tearing, or faul
ty toe-in, or undcr-inflatiop. Wc
will cither repair it free of charge,
or you get a new tire at reduced
price.
N
.
Ot course, wc offer this Surety
Bond only with genuine Dunlop«,
They arc the only tires that arc
built strong enough and fine
enough to make possible a Surety
Bond, especially one as liberal
and sweeping as this is.
Come in and read a copy.
Dunlop's new Winterised
Tire now in stock... This
does away with Chains
DONALDSON'S
GARAGE
Plentywood
Montana
EASY PAYMENTS
GLADLY ARRANGED
BROCKTON WOMAN DIES
WHEN CAR OVERTURNS
Poplar.—Mrs. Frank Kortan, well
known resident of the Anderson com
munity north of Brockton, was in
stantly killed Tuesday afternoon of
last week when she attempted to
jump from a skidding car and it tip
ped over on her.
Mr. and Mrs. Kortan had been in
Brockton
on business and were re
turning home about mid-afternoon.
At a point about three miles north
of town their car, a light sedan, skid
ded and Mrs. Kortan becoming fright
ened, started to climb out. As she
opened the door the car wheels came j
to a stop against the edge of the road
and the car tipped over pinning her
beneath it.
Mr. Kortan was unable to extricate
her until help arrived sometime later.
It is believed that death was almost
instantaneous.
Mrs. Kortan was an elderly woman,
very highly regarded throughout the
community and by acquaintances else
where.
I1JTI | \TQ AITPDI
W II J, I tVl IV P.K l.fl lMIl
BOOSTS PRODUC
TION SCHEDULES
_
Toledo, January 7th.—Production of
Willys-Overland Company's Whippets
and Willys-Knights will be stepped up
to 1,500 cars daily from the present
Daily Output Now 1.500 Cars While
January Shipments May Exceed
30,000.
figure of 1,200 according to informa
tion given out here today by Presi
dent John N. Willys. The company
now has a payroll of approximately
25,000 and this force Mr. Willys states
be enlarged by 10,000 within the
next thirty days,
January orders booked for the new
Superior Whippet fours and sixes and
the New Style Willys-Knight models
are breaking all previous January rec
ords. Mr. Willys said that at the
present rate January shipments are'
expected to pass the 30,000 mark,
"With the introduction at the New
York Automobile Show of the new
Willys-Knight cars and the simul
taneous price reductions on all types
of the Willys-Knight Model 56, fol
lowing closely on the heels of the na
tionwide presentation of the new
Whippets, it appears certain that we
will succeed in our expansion program
calling for the production of 130,000
cars in January, February and March,"
said Mr. Willys. "This is nearly half
the goal of 300,000 cars set for the
first six months and compares with
a production of 73,000 units during
the first quarter of 1928, or an antici
pated increase of 78 per cent."
Steady growth of Willys-Overland
over the last few years is shown by
total sales during 1928 of approxi
mately 318,000 units, compared with
a £otal of 184,127 units in 1927. This
compares with the best previous year,
1925, when sales totalled 214,460 units.
All departments of the company's
plants at Toledo, Elyria, Pontiac and
Los Angeles are operating day and
night to keep pace with production
plans while employment of skilled la
borers is keeping pace with increased
schedules.
During 1928 Willys-Overland pro
ducts led the industry in new car reg
istrations with an increase of 86 per
cent.
ELIMINATE ALL COUN
TY HIGH SCHOOLS
CONVENTION URGES
- :
Livingston, Jan. 15.—Robert C. Elt
ing of Billings was re-elected presi
dent of the Montana School Boards
association at the closing session of
the state convention here. Other of
ficers elected were:
Dominic Spogen of Belt, first vice
president; Hugh McGuire of Anacon
da, second vice president; L. E.
Rhodes of Havre, third vice president;
John J. Baucus of Great- Falls, treas
urer; C. H. Asbury of Hardin, execu
tive secretary. Members of the exe
cutive board, named at the closing
session, were Thomas T. Tutty of
Butte and Fred T. Parker of Hamil
ton -
association went on record as
f av »ring the elimination of all county
schools in the state. The school
board members declared in their reso
lution that educational requirements
of the state have changed since the
establishment of county high schools
and regional or district high schools
have grown to take their places, which
provide high school to many who could
not secure such education if compelled
. .
WILL1STON AUTO
WRECKING CO.
Heail and Wholesalers in
Used and New auto parts
A Complete of New
RING GEARS. PINIONS
AND WHEELS
Mail orders given prompt atten
tion
Phone 112
Williston, N. D.
208 2nd St.
WALTER P. CHRYSLER'S
i
m
TRAFFIC TALKS
SPEED AND JUDGMENT
The exercise of good judgment
in relation to speed is the hall mark
of the careful and able driver. Un
der no condition should speed be
regulated entirely by the "legal
limit". In othpr words, the driver
should never consider that the max
legal limit" is his minimum
imum
rate of speed.
Under many conditions, the so
called "legal limit" is highly danger
ous—often entirely impracticable,
That is because the "legal limit"
is designed in many cases for ideal
driving conditions only. To the
driver of good judgment, anything
tending to interfere with those ideal
conditions necessarily cuts down the
rate of speed.
In cities where there is a speed
law in general, there are also special
subsidiary laws for congested con
ters. These laws are printed with
the traffic regulations which anyone
may obtain.
But, in suburban and country dis
tricts these "subsidiary traffic laws"
are unwritten. Their recognition
and observance are left to the dis
to attend a centralized county school.
The association recommended that
county high schools, as such, be dis- ■
continued as rapidly as possible to]
the end that district high schools
might function unimpaired.
The principle of the equalization
fund for the aid of needy districts
was also approved by the board mem
^ ers as kav i n S proved to be of untold
to needy schools. The reso
! ^i° n asked that closer scrutiny be
| ^y en the financial affairs of the ap
| P^ can ^ district and recommended that
such changes be made in the law as
will insure this fund accomplishing
the purpose for which it was designed.
The association will seek to secure
state legislation to make it compul
sory upon treasurers of various coun
ties to transfer interests earned on
moneys belonging to school districts
entitled to such interest,
pointed out in the debate that interest
on disrict school funds has previously
been transferred to the general funds
of the counties.
Segregation of the state schools for
the deaf and blind and the feeble
minded was urged by the board mem
bers. In passing the resolution ask
ing the state legislature to separate
the two state instituions, the associa
tion declared that Montana is the only
state in the union in which those phy
sically handicapped with either deaf
ness or blindness are placed in the
same school with those who are men
tally deficient.
Miss Elizabeth Ireland, state super
intendent of public instruction, de
livered the principal address and oth
er speakers included W. K. Dwyer of
Anaconda, Mrs. George Hirst of Lew
istown, Fritz Roll of Great Falls and
It was
J. D. Wallace of Butte.
President Alfred Atkinson of Mon
tana State college at Bozeman spoke
on "A State Fiscal Plan."
KILLED BY HIS OWN GUN
Brooklyn, N. Y.—Harry Oswell, 22,
accidentally shot and killed himself
while hunting. Both barrels of his
gun were discharged in his breast
when the trigger caught on a loop in
his shoe string.
Anaconda—Local dairy plant is be
ing extensively remodeled.
ToÀ3^
MOST IMPORTANT GROUP
OF MOTOR CAR OUTERS
Certain American people arc getting on in
the world. Many of them are just starting. But
they're headed up the ladder. Their ideas of
luxury and beauty
expanding. They want
finer homes, finer furniture, finer automobiles.
are
During the past three years, hundreds of
thousands of these
progressive Americans have
been buying the Pontiac Six. Some of them
have bought it as the first car they ever owned.
But to most of them, Pontiac has represented
the first big step up from the lowest priced field.
For this
progressive group, Oakland has
now created a brand new Pontiac Six. It repre
sents an even greater advancement over every
thing else in its field today than the original
Pontiac represented in 1926. It will take its buy
ers farther than ever up the ladder of motor
quality in one step. Watch for the
car
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O. M. DONALDSON, Dealer
Plentywood, Montana
In many.
cretion of the motorist,
many accidents, neglect of the oO
servance of these unwritten laws is
the cause of misfortune,
A few of the conditions which
the driver with good judgment can
recognize as unwritten law are as
follows :
A choppy road full of 'pot
i(
holes .
Unfamiliarity with the route ana
the necessity for finding and read
ing ALL road directions. >
Unusually heavy oncoming trame
and bad gutters,
Single "S" or double "S" curves,
A high road crown and slippery
pavement.^
Pedestrians who happen to be
using the road as a pathway,
Farms with house and barn sepa
rated by road.
An asphalt road bed, rain, poor
tire tread and autumn leaves,
The forepoing are onlv a few of
manv situations which might render
the "legal limit" a hazardous under
taking. In other words, use good
judgment.
FEDERAL OFFICERS
RAID SC0BEY JOINTS
turn their Bands to most any useful
trade » and some of the places visited
,ooked afterwards as though each of
the officers had practiced his individu
al trade » to the great inconvenience
of the victims.
Federal Officers, Assisted by Local
Police Wipe Up Wet Goods Estab
lishments—Six Arrests Made.
_ 1
Scobey,—In a series of raids featur- !
ed by a gas attack at one of the al- j
leged rum shops, six federal officers
and the city's two policemen, Hale '
Nelson and Geo. Johnson, made the
Four places were raided simultane
business of selling liquor at Scobey a
very hazardous one and at leas ttem
porarily dried up the local places.
deliberation for the task in hand. For I
ously and the officers report a fair
amount of evidence was obtained at
each and as a result Tex Barnes, Hen
ry Norby, Mike Ward, Emil Pomar
leau, Jack Dudley and Lester Flick
were arrested. The latter was soon
released but violation of the federal
liquor laws were charged against the
other defendants.
Seven Gas Shots
It would seem that the officers se
lected for the raids were chosen with
a federal man must now also show
ability to obliterate all signs of illicit
booze business wherever he finds it.
For instance, the genial Ted Winters
was formerly a plumber; J. H. Melvin
was a blacksmith; Pat Gould a sharp
shooter; Harry McGee was a butcher;
George Johnson a carpenter; Otto
Wadell, Hecker and Hale Nelson car.
At the "Dirty Shame," where an in
genious door that would have held off
the Bolivian army failed to respond to
the "Open Seasanme" one of Uncle
Sam's searchwarrants, the officers al
so showed a little ingenuity and shot
the place full of gas from their guns,
which will apparently deliver either
lead or smothering fumes. The
pants, among whom were a few cus
tomers, soon decided that moon was
not as essential as fresh air and the
door was opened.
After confiscating what liquor
occu
evi
<tence they could find, the officers also I
j t°°k the cash register and the door
I a nd then demolished the fixtures.
"Little Shame" Tioo.
While the wrecking crew was busy
j a t the first shame, the "Little Shame
I
|
i Was receiving similar treatment. The
i Beer Garden" where Tex Barnes
found in charge, met the same fate.
The "Dove Cot" a more pretentious
I establishment, appropriately yielded
couple gallons of wine to the officers
who were obliged to force an entrance
as there was no one in charge at the
Î time at the place.
was î
a
search
Do It All Over Again
Next morning, before the
v. arrants could get cold, the officers
made the rounds again and, to their
surprise, found the managers discour
! a S e( i n ot at all, but instead were get
ting ready to recuperate their losses.,
The officers again showed* their
handiwork.
That afternoon, just to show that
j they reallv meant it, the officers cull
i ed again end, according to reports,
made quite a thorough job. Four axes
wielded by husky officers soon found
entrances and crashed repeateuiy in
to fixtures and equipment.
CHANGE IN FARMS
DUE, FORD AVERS
Need Complete Revolutionizing, He
Writes in Newly Published Book.
Says Huge Corporations Will Raise
I'°°d Supplies ol the Nation
Groups of Farmers Will Combine.
or
New York, Jan. 9,—A world in
which no one smokes or discusses pro
hibition, where farmers no longer
farm and housekeepers no longer cook
and where machines take care of the
drudgery is outlined by Hnry Ford in
his book, "My Philosophy of Indus
try," just published.
"The great problem in the home
today," the Detroit capitalist points
out," is too much drudgery. We shall
soon find a way to do much of the
cooking outside and deliver it in a
hot and appetizing condition at meal
time at no greater cost.
The old farm is likewise due for a
big change, according to Mr. Ford.
"Farming needs to be completely
revolutionized," he said. "Large cor
porations, whose sole business it will
be to perform the operations of plow
ing, planting, cultivating and harvest
ing, will supersede the individual far
™ er » or groups of farmers will com
bine to perform their work in a
wholesale manner. This is the pro
per way to do it and the only one in
which economic freedom can be won."
Some phrases picked at random
from "My Philosophy of Industry,"
include:
"Machinery is accomplishing in the
world what man has failed to do by
preaching, propaganda or the written
word."
ft
"The man who cannot think is not
an educated man, no matter how
many college degrees he may have
quired."
"The youth who can solve the
money question will do more for the
world than all the proessional sol
diers of history."
"In common decency the liquor
ac
Jfcr Economical Tramportmticn
»1
S'
i m
j
O fie
Outstanding Chevrolet
of Chevrolet History
• u fix in the price ranqe of the four J
represents 4 years of Development
and over a Million miles of Testing
Years ago, the Chevrolet
Motor Company designed
and built its first experi
mental six-cylinder motor.
This far-sighted step was
taken because Chevrolet
engineers knew that the
six-cylinder motor is in
herently the most perfect
ly balanced motor —the
ideal power plant to meet
the growing public de
mand for greater reserve
power, faster get-away
and, above all— smooth,
quiet performance.
During the last four years,
over a hundred six-cylin
* der motors were built by
Chevrolet engineers and
tested on the General
Motors Proving Ground.
Day and night, through
winter's cold and
mer's heat, the incessant
testing went on—until the
present motor was de
veloped and finally pro
nounced correct.
At the same time other
Chevrolet engineers
were perfecting other
parts of the chassis. And
another great automotive
organization—the Fisher
Body Corporation—was
devoting its gigantic
sources to the creation of
the finest, sturdiest and
most beautiful bodies ever
offered on a low-priced
automobile.
As a result, the Outstand
ing Chevrolet offers
order of well-balanced
cellence—a combination
of performance, comfort,
beauty and handling ease
that is truly remarkable
— with a fuel-economy of
better than 20 miles to the
gallon of gasoline.
ex
sum
You owe it to yourself to
see and inspect this re
Come in
markable car.
today!
re
$
The
595
COACH
The
Roadster
The
Phaeton .
*525
*525
The
Coupe
*595
The
an
*675
Sedan
I he Sport $ /-/\r
Cabriole». 695
The Convert- $ — /, p
ibla Landau ... ijL 5
Sedan
Delivery
Light Delivery* $
Chassis.
*595
- V
V.
400
l
V
L
1V4 Ton
Chassis.
1H Ton Chassis $
with Cab.
*545
[niLViT
> X.
650
a
Ail prices f. o. b. Flint,
Michigan
-A
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*15
v
PETERSON COMPANY
GILBERT OLSON
PLENTYWOOD. MONT,
DAGMAR. MONTANA
CLAUSEN CHEVROLET CO.
DOOLEY. MONTANA
QUALITY AT LOW COST
generation should be allowed to die
in silence.
the means to make war and refrains,
Its agonies should not be
the • constant topic of American jour
nais."
"A peaceful nation is one that has
"Thinking is the hardest work there
is, which is the probable reason why
so few engage in it.
th eHudson river,
miraculously rescued his wife and
himself. The McDonalds drove their
MIRACULOUS ESCAPE
Pelham Manor, N. Y.—Trapped in
a closed limousine on the bottom of
J. T. McDonald
car to à ferryboat at Tarrytown to
cross to Nyack. Mrs. McDonald, who
was driving, tried to halt the car at
the ferry's bow but it drove ahead,
crashed through the guard rail and
plunged head down into the river.
The car fortunately landed right side
up at the bottom. McDonald opend
one of the doors, seized his wife and
| swam with her to the surface
The Producers News—$3.00 a year.
- ;m.
All that i
IS
newest... in Style
and Performance
plus the reli
ability thaï makes
Riifrlr
Supreme .
cou
.SEDANS . . . $1220 to $2145
SPORT CARS . $1225 to $1550
'■"70
. . .$1195 to C1875
These prices f. o. b. Buick Factory. Con
venient terms can be arranged on the
liberal G . M. A. C. Time Payment Plan,
The New
BUICK
O. M. DONALDSON, Dealer
Plentywood
Montana
When Better Automobiles Are Built . . . Buick Will Build Hiem
FOR
PROTECTION
AGAINST
FIRE. LIGHTNING, CY
CLONE & WINDSTORM
GET A
POLICY
—IN THE—
NORTHWESTERN
NATIONAL
FOR RATES SEE
"JERRY" THE LITTLE AGENT
Call or Address
G. G. POWELL
Plentywood
Montana

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