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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, April 12, 1929, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85053305/1929-04-12/ed-1/seq-8/

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FROM THE PLENTYWOOD SCHOOLS
i
William Willard
Gladys Carlson -
Mildred Nelson
The Latin II classes are preparing
Staff:—
a sand table projet. They are show
ing the first expedition of Caesar in
to Britain.
The Senior class was entertained at 1
the M. O. Glorvick home by Miss
Njaa on Monday evening. Tryouts
for the Senior calss play were held,
after which lunch was served.
The English X class will have on
display at the end of this week stages
which they have constructed as a part
of their study in the modern drama,
The pupils nave constructed the seen
ery, curtains and furniture f ;r these.
stages.
Six weeks exam'i-.atloni are being
held this week or. Thursday and Fri
day.
Despite the aew Friday evening the
operetta, The Gj p:y Rover, was well
attended. The cast did unusually well
in their singing, there being no notice
able varying from pitch. The chorus
work was well done and the dances
added to the performance. At all
times there was a good stage picture,
The receipts from the operetta were
$179.25 which will go into the general
school fund.
The regular meeting of the Music
Club was held Tuesday evening. There
will be only one more meeting this
year, the second Tuesday in May. The
program given is as follows:
Piano solo—Gwendolyn Christianson,
The Piano, written by Abby McCoy,
and given by Palmner Stenehjem.
Song by four girls.
Reading—Helen Larson.
Clarinet duet—Leo and Mureil Don
aldson.
Piano Solo—Mae Grawe.
First Grade: We learned a new
song about the garden. In art class
we made springtime gardens.
Leona Smith visited school one day.
Third grade: Aloysius Sapa left
school this week, moving to North
Dakota with his parents.
Fourth grade: In language we have
been learning the poem, The Wind
mill.
The Deer are still ahead of the
Foxes in spelling.
Fifth Grade: We are drawing birds
WISCONSIN WET
(Continued from page One)
lieved that the vote had been taken
as an important step toward cutting
the eighteenth amendment out of the
constitution of the United States.
On, State by State!"
State by state, they will continue
their fight they said, as did the pro
hibition forces in bringing the dry is
sue before congress.
. In general, the balloting followed
the outline set in 1926, when the more
populous centers were "wet" and the
rural districts "dry." The increase in
the dry vote reflected the work of
dry organizations, which campaigned
actively this year, whereas in the
beer referendum they instructed their
constituents to ignore the balloting.
tt
Threaten Recall of Legisla
tors Opposing Repeal of Act
Milwaukee, Wis., April 8.—Wis
consin's plea for repeal of the state
prohibition enforcement act and 2,75
per cent beer, rested on the doorstep
of the legislature awaiting action.
Wets, after piling up a majority
of more than 100,000 votes as a pro
test against the eighteenth amend
ment and Volstead and Jones acts,
clamored for the legislators to heed
results of Tuesday's referendum and
wipe the Severson act off the statute
books and erase penalties for making
5
■i4(
I
!
SERVICE EXTENSIONS
AT LESS GOST
Rural Seotiona
and Urban Subscribers Both Benefit
Continuing its aim to provide the most
telephone service and the best, at the least
cost to the public, this company recently
announced an increase in the amount
allowed for the extension of telephone
service to subscribers located in sparsely
settled sections and for the installation of
private branch exchange systems most -
commonly provided for larger telephone
users in cities and towns.
r-r
Previously,
this company in furnishing service to out
lying subscribers had paid at least $35.00 of the cost of
construction for extending a new line from an isolated ranch
or fa: m to the nearest existing telephone pole line. Under
the new practice now effective, the company will pay $75.00
and iu some oases more, when conditions warrant.
■impl/ another affirmation of this company's continuing
effort to provide a service that will enable anyone anywhere
to tal i by telephone with anyone else anywhere else.
This is
In connection with the Installation of
privai e branch exchange equipment,
ployec by large telephone users, this
pany'î former allowance to the subscriber
was î 5.00 for each telephone connected.
This imitation has now been removed,
tire!y and these types of private branch exchange systems
will be provided without payment of
charges.
The new practices, therefore, will benefit
In ren.ote sections and also subscribers in
em
I !
com
n »» 1
en
any Installation
new subscribers
cities and towns.
A CONTINUALLY IMPROVING SERVICE
■S
using the Biology room specimens as
models. Demas Sapa has withdrawn
from school.
Two new pupils have entered the
grades: Jane Ridenour in the 8th an
her sister Alice in the 7th.
Benefits of School Activities
Mildred Nelson
It should be the desire of every
pupil and patron to raise the stand
ards of the school in one's community,
Just how it is to be done is another
thing. Cooperatin and school spirit
can be brought about through well di
rected school activities. School act
V1 * ies are , :n ?f , an k d
school work if they are well work
ou ^
There has always been two sides to
every question, and there always will
be as long as the world endures. We
see so often that people argue in a
circle and never know just definitely
what they are arguing. It takes sys
tematic thought and knowledge to de
bate intelligently, so why not have a
debating club in our school where pu
pils will get the right foundations for
proper debate.
Doing has always been more effec
tive than just reading. In life we do
and act. Why not make our reading
and study more life-like by acting and
studying the principles of self
pression. Dramatic clubs for pupils
will satisfy that need,
Our great out-doors has many a
hidden pleasure for those who can see
with sympathetic eyes and hear with
ears that understand. But how shall
one know who has not heard. In ad
dition to a knowledge of nature there
is always the health element that en
ters into the question of the open air.
There is a need for Nature-study
clubs. Closely allied with this might
come a physical education club that
will teach the fundamentals of health
ful living, morally and physically.
Hiking with a purpose is always bene
ficial pastime.
We have at present some school
activities, but there must be some
thing wrong with them because they
are not well attended, and we feel
that they do not reach enough stu
dents.
Let us talk up our school activities
and build un a program which will
take care of our wants and needs.
ex
beer—a product for which this city
was made famous.
Since the refendum does not auto
matically change the law, the real
battle between wets and dry will come
in the legislative chambers in Madi
son. The legislature had indicated
it would be guided by the vote.
Rumbles of the impending fight
were heard in a wet move that threat
ened to demand recall of legislators
who vote against repeal of the dry
acts.
Washington.—The fact that Wis
1 consin has voted nearly 2 to 1 against
state prohibition five months after it
gave a 6-to4 majority against Gov.
Alfred E. Smith, the wet in the last
j presidential campaign, was the sub
I iect of comment here tdoay among po
litical leaders.
•While Senator Borah of Idaho and
other supporters of President Hoover
pointed to the political paradox as an
insignificant exception to the general
dry attitude manifest in the last elec
tion campaign, supporters of Govern
or Smith such as Senators Caraway,
democrat, Arkansas, and Norris, re
publican, Nebraska, asserted the Wis
consin results showed prohibitior was
not an issue in the last campaign.
Both Caraway and Norris are dry.
Borah, who led the dry campaign
for Mr. Hoover and who looked upon
the election as nearly a national ref
erendum on prohibition, pointed out
while prohibition may not have in
WASHINGTON COMMENTS
ON 2 TO 1 PHOBITION VOTE
fluenced the election result in Wis
certamly some
consin there were
places in which it had an effect.
Taking the opposite view, Senator
Norris told the United Press.
I think the Wisconsin referen
dum demonstrated that the nation
al election was not a national ref
erendum on prohibition. The same
voters in Wisconsin who elected
Mr. Hoover have now declared for
repela of the state enforcement
law.
Drys insist little significance should
be attached to the Wisconsin referen
dum because the state generally has
been accepted as a wet state.
• *
! months in Washington jail.
The four questions, which Sinclair
charged in his appeal were improper,
asked about Sinclair's dealings with
two publishers, Bonfils of the Denver
Post and Shaffer of the Rocky Moun
tain News, whose claims to parts of
Teapot Dome were settled by Sinclair
before he leased Teapot Dome from
Secretary of Interior Fall. A third
( question asked where Sinclair met
Fall previous to the making of the
lease, and a fourth, put by Senator
Adams of Fall. Senator Thomas J.
Walsh, the committee prosecutor, who
led in tracking the devious course of
the illegal leases made by Fall on the
government's naval oil reserves, put
the first three questions. It develop
ed later that Sinclair delivered to Fall
more thar $250,000 in cash and Lib
erty bonds. The supreme court can
celled the leases and said they were
the illegal fruits of a corrupt con
spiracy.
SINCLAIR
(Continued from page One)
information in public matters, Jus
tice Butler said, are not abrogated by
the fact that information brought out
may have a bearing on criminal suits
in which the witness is concerned.
Congress, he added, had full power
to inquire into the various claims of
persons to the oil reserves. Two ques
tions which Sinclair refused to ans
wer concerned outsiders' claims to the
rich petroleum reserves.
The oil multimillionaire was not
present. He is believed to be in
his New York home. Under ordin
ary procedure, the court's man
date will be sent to federal auth
orities in 25 (lays, at which time
Sinclair will be called on to surren
de». ^
Sinclair on March 22, 1924, refused
bo answer any questions of the com
mittee, and he was indicted a few
days later on 10 counts, each specify
ing a question. He was convicted on
four counts by a jury, and sentenced
to pay a $500 fine and serve three
EVEN EXPERTS ERR
Ottawa-—(FP)—Even experts err.
When the Ontario Hydroelectric was
being launched in 1905, Lord Kelvin,
world-famous scientist, was asked
whether electricity could be transmit
ted 80 miles from Deceau Fall
Hamilton. He said the idea was ab
surd.
A SPECIAL OFFER!
I
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The
New Frigidaire
Equipped with the New
Cold Control
At Reduced Prices
Now on Display at our stores
u
99
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no
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Down
Per Month
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ML
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MODEL D-5
$10
on Installation
\
Frigidaire now at Price within reach of aO
Frigidaire Sale Features
typ® °f IwwdioW cabinet may be purchased on «imik f tenon.
A new household model for as low as $195, delivered.
^: n ! i>n ^ rat,0n y® 01 home during sale only. Communicate
nearest office.
**ery model equipped with the New "Cold Contrai*.
Twenty-four months time to pay balance If yon
Jn SSÄST" ,rte " ** * ** * **
Ihe New Frigidaire gives the greatest value
ti i sxorjr•
\
Montana-Dakota Power
j
==

MONTANA WEEKLY
lUUll I Hlin
INDUSTRIAL REVIEW
Natural gas will be supplied to
residents of Choteau future.
Plans discussed for building pro
posed gas line from notrhern Montana
gas fields to Butte and Anaconda.
Helena—State Highway Commis
sion orders removal of all commercial
advertising signs from ngm-of way
along Federal highways in Montana
before January 1 ; 1930.
Vtshti Petroleum Company of Great
Falls incorporated with $150,000 cap
ital.
new public play
Butte—Three
grounds will be established and exist
ing baseball fields will be improved
this summer.
Construction of four-story Medical
Arts Building will begin shortly in
Great Falls,
Missoula— Clark's Fork highway be
ing improved.
Great Falls— Construction work at
two local hospitals will be started
shortly.
Mountain State Telephone & Tele
graph Company installed exchange at
Flaxville.
Wolf Point—Work started on rail
oad spur which is part of prelimin
ary work in construction of Missouri
River bridge near here.
Great Falls—Cascade county fair
grounds to be improved.
Building activity in Havre on up
ward trend.
Deer Lodge—Rialto Theatre will be
remodeled and Vitaphone equipment
installed.
Gas Development Company plans to
drill additional wells in vicinity south
of Glendive in near future.
New Congregational church will be
built in Livingston.
Conrad—Local Nash automobile
agent will build brick agarage.
Terry—Lighting system to be in
stalled on seven blocks of Main street
in this place.
Mountain States Telephone & Tele
graph Company laying cable exten
sions costing more than $92,000 in
streets of Butte.
Great Falls Power Company pur
chased by Montana Power Company.
Numerous buildings under construc
tion in and around Augusta.
Great Falls
szrsssrz
of H.1«. Gas .
Electric Company moved to Granite
Building.
Great Northern'railway to build
stockywds east of Shelby.
Construction of overhead bridge
crossing Great Northern railway line
"
P National Parks Airways will con
ivaiionai rarKS Airways win con
| t X t -s h SciS'l d ai^ bUil<ii,,B at
Anaconda -'KniÄ Columbus
will erect $60,00« clubhouse here this
summer.
Construction of new Federal and
State highway from Dillon to Daly's
spur recently started.
Highways in vicinity of Grass
Range being improved.
Mountain States Telephone Compa
ny improved system in Ryegate.
Says C !l nadian Farmers
Solve Relief Problem
Washington — (FP) — Canada's
wheat farmers, by forming the
groat co-operative wheat-market
pool which is now the world's most
successful enterprise in that field,
have shown the way for effective
farm relief. This was the opinion
given the Senate committee on ag
riculture, March 27, by G. W. Con
nell, of the Minnesota Wheat Grow
ers Marketing Association.
Connell presented the demands
of the National Wheat Piool Con
ference at Kansas City, which ask
ed that surplus products of the
farm be afforUed the benefits of a
protective tariff through the Mc
Nary-Haugen bill. He said that if
the stabilization features of this
bill were enacted into law, 60 per
cent of American wheat farmers
Could be brought into the co-oper
atives, and would thereby aid in
the process of stabilizing farm
prices.
MONTANA DIVORCE IS HELD
INVALID IN THE PROVINCES
Lethbridge, Alta.—A divorce grant
ed in Montana courts, providing the
husband is domiciled in Canada ,is
not recognized in Canada, according
to a judgment just handed down here
by Chief Justice Simmons of the su
preme court of the province. The
judgment was given in the suit of
Munroe against Munroe, which hinged
on the validity in Canada of a divorce
granted in Montana.
Judge Simmons held that, according
to the English law, recognized in Ca
nadian courts, the Montana divorce
did not hold good as Claude Munroe,
the husband, was at that time domi
ciled in Canada, an though his first
wife was in the United States, she
was by law domiciled in Canada, as
the domicile of the husband is that
of the wife also. In that the parties
were domiciled in Canada and not in
the United States, the divorce granted
was accordingly invalid.
Unregistered Radio Station
Broadcasting In Great Falls
Great Falls.—Real progress is be
E-lf.
Carr _ prcsident 0 }' the dub . B
Mr. Walker has reported that he has
discovered a sma |[ broadcast!!!? sta
...tion in Great Falls, heretofore un
fc d ( b tbe majority of fans. A
MmmUtee Vi,, be i ppo î n ted at the
* "«* meeting of the club to visit the
party °P eratin S the station and de
f-pv-vnnp wbnt <;ten <5 «shall hp taken to
cSy the »itÄ
., ^ most of the
t?ttofte homes oÄere. Sid can
be corrected through the educational
program planned by the club. Electric
al appliances in most cases were caus
ing the trouble.
Butte—Constructions undei-way on
National Parks Airways hangar and
office at Butte airport.
KILL
The Gophers
Use Miller's Gopher Poi
son. It goes farther and
is cheaper. Ask us a
bout it.
Miller's Pharmacy
Phone 133
Plentywood
READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS—IT WILL PAY YOU.
For Economical
_
The Massey-Harris
20^30 TRACTOR
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Æ
IS THE OUTSTANDING
TRACTOR OF TO-DAY
Because:
It has the highest fuel economy ever official
ly recorded for any wheel tractor approach
ing it in weight and piston displacement.
It delivers one horse power at the drawbar
for every 168 pounds of its weight without
extension rims.
It pulls 73% of its weight at the drawbar at
2.98 M. P. H.
It develops one horse power at the drawbar
for each 12.8 cubic inches of piston displace
ment.
The Reason:
MODERN ENGINEERING
HIGH GRADE MATERIALS—
Certified" WORKMANSHIP.
The Results:
LONGLIFE
ECONOMICAL PERFORMANCE
<<
The quickest way for you to obtain "Farm Relief"
is to
REDUCE Your PRODUCTION COST
The Walhs Certified" Tractor will reduce your op
erating costs more, because IT HAS
HIGHEST FUEL ECONOMY, AND THE LONG
EST LIFE.
Investigate the Wallis before you invest in "more
expensive" tractors.
Plentywood Machine Shop
Local Distributors
Massey-Harris Company

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