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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 03, 1929, Image 8

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FROM THE PLENTYWOOD SCHOOLS
î
i
Staff—
Goldie Baker
Vera Collins
Lee Chapman
Edie Matkin won the local declam
atory contest held last Thursday ev
ening at the Orpheum theater, giving
The Perfect Tribute." She will rep
resent Plentywood at the state meet
to be held at Missoula May 9-11. Sec
ond place was won by Abby McCoy
who gave the very difficult reading,_
Humoresque." Third place was won 1
by Kenneth Olson, he read "The Soul
of the Violin." Other contestants
were Helen Larson reading "Laddie,"
Charles Johnson reading "The Swan
Song" and Inger Olson reading "Bob
bite Shaftoe." The girls glee club
two selections and Miss Betty
«<
«
sang
Baker gave a cello solo.
We might say something about the
attendance at this contest. The peo
ple of Plentywood are always splen
did about patronizing school doings,
but when it confes to Declamatory
contests there seems to be little inter
est. This event is a big one In the
lives of those taking part and it is of
great value to them and the audience
has so much to do with the spirit in
which a reading is given. We invite
you to give your encouragement to
the pupils who are trying to do their
best in this line.
The boys division of General Sci
is now constructing bird houses.
ence
There are 15 houses in the process
of construction, and some have prom
ise of being very attractive.
On Friday afternoon the school band
played for the Assembly. On Mon
day evening they appeared before the
P. T. A. They played six selections
with a finish which was almost sur
prising for so new an organization.
You will all remember that the Band
was started late in the fall of 192 1
under the direction of Miss Scott, and
did very well for a first year. The
Band lost several good members thru
graduation last year, so that there is
much new material in the Band this
year. However, only one member will
be lost this year, so we can look for
ward to a fine band next year. Mr.
Behm deserves credit for the work
that the band has accomplished this
The band will appear in con
cert at the Orpheum Theatre on May
17, 1929. There will be instrumental
numbers at this program also.
On Friday evening this week the
Seniors will give their play, "The Go
Getter." Do not fail to see this come
dy. The humor is caused by the ceri
•of the Spanish people in the
light of the Americans' remarks.
At a meeting of the basketball
squad, Kenneth Olson was elected
captain for the year just over,
ters were awarded to members of the
team at an assembly meeting on
Monday. Mr. Stegner made the
awards. Mr. Cady, Kenneth Olson and
Robert Zeidler made remarks. Plen
tywood brought home a silver loving
cup from the tournament held at 'Cul
bertson. The mile relay was won by
Let
vear.
ousness
G-E
Electric Store
Everything Electrical
Maytag Agency - Expert
Wiring
N. HENDERSON
Plentywood
Phone 13.
WHAT WOULD YOU DO?
H|—you had found your mon
J —your wedding day arrived
Hh —the guests had assembled
; 1
W —and found your sweetheart
in the arms of your aster!
you opened a door
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WARHtR
SEE AND HEAR FANNIE BRICE SING HER
OLD FAVORITES AND MANY NEW ONES!
Orpheum Theatre
Plentywood
Sunday and Monday, May 5 and 6
Orbeck Hovdey, Leland McNulty,
Leonard Olson and Lee Hair. Those
receiving letters were: Melvin Fiske,
Loyal Gunderson, Kenneth Olson, Rob
ert Zeidler, Marx Krogman, Buford
Jelemland, and Leland McNulty.
Mr. Stegner made a week end trip
to North Dakota in the interest of
the Plentywood schools.
County play day is to be held at
Plentywood on May 11th. The grade
school children will compete in '■'an
activities of scholarship and ath
j et i cs
-j> be f rC shmen are practising public
speaking now. They aspire to become
as efficient in this line as the Seniors.
f qrades
ous
The first grade gave a little sketch
at the P. T. A. program on Monday
evening.
The second graders have been test
ed in spelling according to the Ayres
Spelling scale. Two new rubber in
flated rubber balls have been used in
a heated relay race at recess.
The third graders are observing
Child Health Day on May 1, by mak
ing posters and having an impromptu
health program.
The fourth graders are having
"Uncle Remus and His Friends" read
to them in stoy hour this week._ The
girls are enjoying a new sport ball at
recess.
Mrs. Glorvick susbstituted for Miss
Varney on Tuesday.
Editorial—Lee Chapman
PEP RALLIES
It is true that there is no effect
without a cause, but to find the cause
in most cases constitutes a real prob
lem. In all kinds of athletics there
is always someone who breaks train
ing rules and then it can not be the
fault of the student body that a play
er or team is weak,
hand much of the failure we have in
games is that the student body does
not give the right support.
The team that knows that the stu
dent body is behind it will put up the
best fight for it wants to prove that
it is worthy of the trust that is placed
in it. A successful team is not the
team that makes the most baskets
during the game. The team backed
by its student body displaying always
the very finest type of sportsmanship
is the good team. It is hard to be a
good loser, but it is the thing which
really shows whether or not there is
real sportsmanship.
The Plentywood schools have shown
good support during the past year ev
en though our team lost most of the
games. It is good sportsmanship that
we want more than anything else, and
if we turn out to give the team a
lusty backing we know that they will
do their best.
On the other
COUNTY SCHOOLS
The board of county examiners
composed of Principals W. H. May, G.
F. Friesleben and County Superintend
ent Singleton met in conference last
Saturday in connection with the April
examinât 1 ' ons.
The new director of the Child Wel
fare Division of the State Board of
Health, Ma Belle True, was unable to
supply us with a field nurse this
spring, since one of the nurses in this
service resigned the first of April.
Mrs. True has promised to send us a
health nurse in September, if it is
possible for her to do so.
The next state 7th and 8th grade
examinations will be held at Plenty
wood, Redston» and Medicine Lake,
May 16th and 17th.
County Supt. Singleton and Deputy
Hall visited the Redstone, Points,
Outlook and Dooley schools recently.
. tbe WO rk in all of these
^n y ol of excelirnt standard.
F •« T indauist teacher of the
w^ncn'^rhool Dist. No. 69, and
Ward of the Brightsman school,
f tu« 65 each report 100% at
Sninrp'for the past month. Mrs.
Hp7p 1 Michels als(f reported 100% at
for the last month of her
tendance
school.
There were seventy-seven
dates who wrote at the recent state
examination in April. These examin
held for the pupils of
candi
ations were
short term schools. .
The following teachers visitedthe
office the past week: Mrs Nrta Rob
inson, Laura Vista, Eva Cached, Eu
gene Powell, Laura Ferch, Olga Wal
ler, Wynona Wankel, Letha Hawkins.
Other visitors were Mr. Fred ktone,
F. Freisieben, W. H. May, A. O.
Totdahl, Arthur Rehmer, Mrs. Amy
Frank, Mrs. Ridenour, Clark Potter,
Mr. Dahlgaard, Mrs. Rose Weiss,
Katie Schikurski, Isabelle Porter,
Mrs, Dominik, Mrs, John Nelson,
Mrs. Francis Louva and Mrs. Jackson.
We want to express our apprecia
tion to Mr. Frank Fishbeck for his
assistance in making our Roundixp
Day a success. By special arrange
ment the public may hear the finals
in the Declamatory Contest, and the
presentation of awards to winners in
the scholastic and athletic contests.
They may also remain for the regu
lar moving picture program, all for
the regular price of admission. Don't
forget the date, May 11th.
MITCHELL FORMS
(Continued from page One)
others to play. This week he will
start the first of a number of young
Belgrade people on new brass and
reed instruments. They will be begin
ners, and it is his ambition bo make
Belgrade not only notorious for its
airport but for the musicians here. It
is his contention that if started right
the youthful musician will develop
faster and love the art to a greater
extent. There has been more interest
in music since the advent of the
Mitchell family in Blegrade than was
ever known before.
While Mr, Mitchell knows music
and how to teach it, getting the best
from his organization, and enjoying
every minute of it, he must be seen
and heard playing in his dance band
for one to appreciate his talent and
ability. When it is said that he
... ...........
one of the greatest artists in that hne
" the £ " IK>thl "e ° ver
dram '- B | f ?" J the danc< i was wc " un
der Saturday evening numerous
' eau " ts were made for engagements,
«"re an no aim dates until af
ter the flrst of May.
FRAZIER ATTACKS
a
^
Democratic caucus attended by 31 of ;
the 39 members of the party in the
senate. The conference also decided
it would not be practicable to attempt
infusion of the equalization fee in the!
farm, bill. • - ' '
(Continued from page One)
cm the toes of the very special inter
1 ests that have been helped long agio
by congress.
j
Democrats Convene
Decision not to attempt to bind De
mocrats in the senate to the export
debenture plan was reached today at a
I
Brookhart Attacks Hciover
Senator Brookhart enlivened the'
lata hours of yesterday with an at
tack on the farm relief program un- j
derstood to have Hoover's endorse-!
ment.
The Iowa senator's address
was i
punctuated with flourishes of pamph-i
lets containing the speeches he had
made for Hoover in the presidential
campaign. He had described the chief'
executive during that contest as "the
best friend the farmer ever had."
Brookhart said that prior to election,
Mr. Hoover had given every indica
tion that he would "
equality to agriculture.
"On that basis, I supported him,
he shounted.
actually bring
But when his mess
age came to congress, we found the
'the agricultural
problem must be solved' changed to
the statement that 'it cannot be done
in a day'."
Congress has the power to solve
this question over a veto.
He declared that he "would like to
see some vetoes" and then watch con
gress vote after them, because he for
one, had not "surrendered his seat in
the senate to the White House."
statement that
>.
CONGRESS ROWS
OVER TARIFF REVISION
Washington, April 27.—Muffled
thunder emanated from the house
ways and means committee room to
day, where the tariff bill is being
made ready for consideration in the
house early next week.
Both houses were in recess until
Monday. Ihe senate is ready for an
other week of oratory over the deben
ture plan of farm relief but in the
end probably will reject this and pass
a bill much like the one the house
adopted.
The house committee is finishing
up six weeks of work in executive
session, and while its members have
denounced every "leak" of the pro
ceedings, authentic information has
been obtained indicating a strenuous
contest is developing over such vital
rates as sugar, wool and hides.
Wool 31 to 34.
It was reported on good authority
the sugar tariff which reaches every
breakfast table may be boosted from
$2.20 a hundred pounds to $3. The
report has been sufficiently authenti
cated to cause the Cuban Ambassador
Ferrara to deliver a strong speech in
Philadelphia today, denouncing the
proposed increase.
Wool may be boosted from 31 cents
cents; cotton and wool textiles con
to 34 cents; com from 15 cents to 25
cents; cotton and wool textiles
siderably above their present
hides, bricks, cement and
con
rates;
, ,, . M manganese
materially increased and lumber
unchanged on the free list.
These previsions can and may be
altered before the bill is presented to
the house probably next Tuesday.
Democrats Split
All reports, indicate clearly a
heavy tariff battle is in prospect, de
mocrats are split ove** the issues and
have announced their anger over dot
to
being admitted to secre ^
meetings where someiputai ofthe bill
are being written. The U usua l sec
recy has resulted in. c ^a g s that nu
merous deals are ^ e "? g ™ ade between
sectional representatives, a practise
known as "log rolling" whereby rep
resentatives of various, sections form
an alliance to put over mutually bene
ficial rates. .
Senate republicans already have
announced their hearings are to be
secret although they do not expect to
begin work on the bill for a month,
They say they want to frame a bill
which can be taken to the floor of
both houses and put through virtual
ly without amendment, in order that
there will be no log-rolling on the
floor. j
-- it
Poll Shows Senate 53 to
no I
38 Against debenture
op on.
Washington, April 29.—-The senate j J
iines up 53 to 38 against the deben
ture farm relief plan to which Presi
dent Hoover is so strongly opposed, ;
it was revealed in a private pool to
day as hot debate over the issue got
under way in the upper house of
congress.
The poll shows 4o republicans and
8 democrats against «.he tariff boun
ty provision; 29 democrats and 9 re
publicans in favor of it, three sena
tors doubtful and one absent. It.
shows conclusively that while the
dispute over Mr. Hoover's contest
with the senate is close, it is not
close enough to be very doubtful.
Known to President
The figures are known to the pres- j
ident and the democrats who both are ,
exerting extraordinary efforts to
swing wavering
spective sides before the vote is tak
en probably next Thursday. Mr.
Hoover has called many of the form
erly doubtful ones to the White
House. A dinner was held last week
for two senators who are in the doubts
ful list on the measure but neither
senator, it is learned has since given
evidence of a desire to vote with the
administration.
Seldom since the League of Nations
fight in the senate has such pressure
been exerted, either on the side of
the White House or on the part of
the opposition in the senate. Sena
tors have concluded Mr. Hoover is
vitally interested in the defeat of the
debenture plan, and democrats on the
.other hand are determined to make
a party record in favor of it.
The poll shows Sen, Nye of North
Dakota and Capper of Kansas against
debenture, and Shipstead of Minneso
ta absent.
is
-
'
AGRICULTURAL CABI
NET BROUGHT UNDER
• FIRE OF SENATE
Washington, April 30.—President
Hoover's new secretary of agriculture,
Arthur M. Hyde, was brought under
a brief fire in the senate today as
both houses of congress entered their
third week on the farm relief pro
gram.
The senate resumed debate on the
administration-debenture bill while
the house decided that because the
tariff bill will not be ready until next
it would spend Wednesday,
of ; Thursday and Friday on four minor
the farm relief
the!
Hyde's part in the administration
program was brought up in the sen
ate debate when it developed the sen-j
De
a
measures.
I
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The
1. G. A. FAMILY
OF COFFEES
n
A Blend for Every Taste
and Pocketbook
V Blend 'G' Blend 'A' Blend
I
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SPECIALS MAY 4TH TO MAY 11TH
CALUMET BAKING POWDER 16 " 28 c
can
LG. A. ASSORTED COOKIES
PUFFED WHEAT
PRESERVES,
28 e
4
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UNIVERSITY Pure-Delicious
Asst. Flavors, 16 oz. Jar
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FRUITS FOR SALAD
UNIVERSITY 5 " 1
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QUEEN OLIVES' 5 "™"
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Quart ^()C
Large &
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8 Golden Large No. 91C
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CRUSHED PINEAPPLE
For Delicious
Salads & Desserts
23 e
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Small CC
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SWEET PEAS
LA FAVORITE CHOCOLATES
29 c
Asst. 1
Lb. Box
INGWALSON
CO.
Dry Goods. Shoes and Groceries
Phone 47
Plentywood
ate agriculture committee had not
printed the testimony of two agricul
tural department experts favorable to
the debenture plan so strongly de
nounced by the president.
Publication of the testimony was
demanded by Senator Joseph T. Rob
mson, democratic floor leader, who
said their opinions "would probably
have more weight than the head of
the department (Mr. Hyde) whp has
had very little experience in agricul
ture, but wno has been an automobile
dealer."
The upshot of the debate was that
Chairman McNary announced he
would call his agriculture committee
together tomorrow to decide whether
the testimony should be printed. The
j matter is important not only because
it may show a conflict between agri
cultural experts on one hand and
I H y de and Hoover on the other, but
also because the champ ions of the
debenture plan intend bo use this evi
j J ence in their fight against the ad
ministration in the senate.
_
; qpiu *tt c P F F H Q
»MLlVAiE. O r °
FARM AID BILL
_
Washington, May 1.—Having adopt
e( j the Norris amendment to the ex
p0 rt debenture section of its farm re
n e f bill> tbe sen ate was in position to
bay to pr0C eed toward a vote on that
disputed provision,
xhe amendment, which changes
the debenture section to provide re
duction of debenture rates when
overproduction is forecast in effect
dd crops, was adopted without a
j reo ord vote. It had the support of
, members opposed to the plan as a
wbl3 i e wbo , as Chairman McNary of
tbe agriculture committee put it, see
fto ob j ec tion to perfecting a legisla
tive prop<)sa i, even though they in
ten d to vo t e against it.
Possibility of other important
, ne ndments being offered was sug
gested by the announcement of Me- j
Nary that he would discuss such pro- ;
posa i s w ith a group of dairy associa
tion representatives. The National
Co-operative Milk Producers' Federa
tion ma( j e protest last week against
provisions in the bill "that require co
j operative marketing associations to
own> control and manage" the propos
e< j stabilization corporations,
Nevertheless, senate leaders hope to
br ing the débentùre section to a vote
w ithout delay and to pass the bill it
se ]f be fore the weekend adjournment,
Chairman Haugen of the house agri
culture committee announced that con
j sidération of additional farm legisla
tion would be deferred until after the
tariff bill has been passed. The deci
sion was reached after word reached
house leaders from the senate that the
of additional legislation by
,
passage
the house would complicate the situa
tion on the other end of the copitol.
WOLF POINT BRIDGE
as
(Continued from page One)
it necessary for any one in this sec-1
tion going south of the river to travel
five miles further west and the same
distance back or ten miles further in
order to get to the bridge. It is re
ported that feeling against this propo
sition has aroused people in east
ern Roosevelt county that a definite
project to punish Wolf Point is now
underway to resubmit the matter of
the county seat to the voters of that
county with the idea of locating the
county seat at Culbertson. It is saidj
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The Utmost Care With
Prescriptions
Let your doctor tell you what he thinks of our pre
scription service. He will tell you that we have giv
en satisfaction ever since we have been in business.
On account of the large volume of prescription
business done by us our drugs are always fresh and
pure.
Miller's Pharmacy
&
iri
Plentywood
Phone 133
w.
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that eastern Roosevelt county and
j Poplar are uniting on the project. Five
; years having passed since the county
seat was located at Wolf Point, the
resubmission is now legal,
Committee Appears Before Highway
Commission
XS
Representative Arthur Ryder of
Froid, Ex-Senator H. P. Lowe of Cul
bertson, T. P. Danielson and W. L.
Rose of Poplar, appeared before the
Highway Commission at Helena, last
Friday for the purpose of objecting
to the completion of the Wolf Point
bridge road as surveyed. Only two
members of the Commission were
present at the hearing as Commis
sioner Warden of Great Falls was ab
sent from the state.
According to the report of the com
mittee it was generally agreed by
those present that the present survey
was unfair to Northeastern Montana
, and against the wishes of at least 75%
of the taxpayers of Roosevelt county.
It was contended, however, that the
line of road could not be changed for
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Try this Tractor
and it's the one you'll buy
RIVE a Wallis "Certified Tractor" and
you'll want to own one. The more you
use it, the better you'll like it. You start
the smooth running, modem, 4-cylinder engine
and get under way. Then you find that the
Wallis steers as easily as your car; that it runs
smoothly on gasoline or low grade fuel without
any change in motor equipment; that it's in a
class by itself.
Back up to any piece of power farming equip
ment. You make the hitch in a moment—no
helper needed. Hour after hour you keep go
ing. The Wallis Tractor is built to do your
work—not to make you work.
The Wallis "Certified" Tractor has been engi
neered and developed thru 1 3 years of field
service without basic change in design. It is
as to design, material, workman
ship and inspection. 5291 individual inspec
tions are made in building a Wallis "Certified'
20-30 Tractor.
D
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Certified
v *
ÎO^JOTRACTOR 'I 4 -—
m
Si
delivers
MORE POWER
for
MORE YEARS
and at
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it in
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Weight and
other tractor approaching
Piston Displacement.
Plentywood Machine Shop
the reason that a contract had U.
let for its consruction, but that
County board should be compelled J
give a road to the north.
The undisputed facts disproved tin
contention. The contract was let j*.
fore any right of way had been se
cured. Where roads cross IndijJ
lands the law requires that a sunn I
of such line of road be made and st>|
mitted to the Indian Superintended
who shall view the proposed lined
road and either approve or disapprod
of it. No such steps were ever taker«
before the contract was let and in fact!
the proposed line of road has nevd
been formally approved by Supers I
tendent Eggers, who has at all tind
contended that It would be much bet
ter for all concerned to construct it
on the section line rather than fond
it over Indian lands, threeby causiri
great injury and inconvenience. It
was also admitted by the Commisa«
and its engineers that said line t!
road had been changed at least om
since the contract was let.
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