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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, March 07, 1930, Image 1

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MONT.
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
♦h»
OF
JIEMBEK
united pre ^
^ftdera
antral
IolÛME
THE PRODUCERS
NEWS GOES INTO
EVERY HOME IN
SHERIDAN COUNTY
ted Press
Asf* 1 -
press
A PAPER OF THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE. BY THE PEOPLE
_PLENTYWOOD, MONTANA, FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 1930.
C..U RoIps • Foreign, *3.76 per |w
3UD. Kates. (D XJ. 8.. 98.00 per rear
XII. Number 49.
BntereE as Second Claas Matter October 18. 1018, at the Pos«
_
â s 14 e See It
O'Flaherty
by T om
to
ol news
failure of
conference
approximately
beings
biggest Piece
the obvious
reduction
fact iH* 1 !
millions of human
to work cannot find em
1 in the United States,
Hoover's engineermg
j »be intent of the lord.>
V
la« i*
tk» na val
in.
it
fVffl
jument
make
•' rdu \v en vou toted fw Hoo
!%pn»bahly thol that he
tobMhot that AI Smith could
*U it Well, as a matter of
t neither Al nor Herbert Van
eouM do it*
» i *
Y o ii
Ml!
millions of men
bricks
because
There are seven
^ »onien walking the
Inited States
are no markets where goods
•ed by them can be sold by
[Tnamifacturers at a profit,
rh there is no such nn animal
, an employer who will give a
ioh unless he behaves
make a profit out of
the
M
fllfl« 3 J
hat he can . . ..
ht investment he tosses into the
Tr e)|. Do you blame him?
t ? t » T f Î
^ there are unemployment
#*: And the papers blame the
S U matc Ut mfcmpl5ymVnn
[ou knm they did not. \N hat the
(«pif what they must do to
»''.ffd-ltaZ
„il get their heads broken in or
£ "ÎTfTr *
ï, anil t„ the mean, by
rhifh this social scourge can be
with Of course the
That is
r
D Stock-well, that is something
sue away
ommunists are Crazy,
niius. Anybody is crazy
dcs out of his way to tell the
(op'e what they should do in or
>r to benefit themselves
who
as
Is# again.
...
producing classes, the indus
worker« th®
j«uig in a state «f uncertainty,
iky produce all the wealth yet
ky are not sure of the next
kal. Is it not a glorious system
Mociety. Blame Hoover. Per
Lu*LT»» eec ' t xr A Smith it
be w'tter. Nonsense.
1 1 1 1 I 1 t
!!!!!!!
We have seven milions of men
nd women out of work in the
nited States, We have millions
f farmers who do not know
ther they are going to be
le tia clothe and shelter their
milks next year. Here w*e have
L
■ Hoover could not create era
Btoyment it he wanted to. If there
no markets where manufac
d goods can he sold at a pro
to the patriotic peddler,
will be sold on that market,
Binai is why we have a naval
«ference h London. That is a
^pniggie for markets. "Ports to
^rP°rt prunes."
no
!!!!!!!
It is folly to blame Hoover
* republican party for
wment. The
or
unem
same situation
»wild exist under a democratic
»ministration. The Communists
»ul onme in for a lot of abuse,
vorse. but they offer the on
h solution for unemployment and
I "t is ( 0 have the farmers anU
[Workers take
over the
. j . . govern
■w and administrate things on
' »operative basis for the best
■Rrests of all the people. You
T not like this but it just just
»hat you will have to do.
Squirrel Food
J
By A. NUTT
Ihi
*l . "Nig" Collins
ttjyw*t^ lshbcc * tria L w Wch is
l «n of court at Plentywood,
Thursday, March 26,
^4 upon as a sort of an
°f the Sheridan coun
campaign,
P»S r U l!* ins and ikirdcr
occur at a special
* lr »lman Ted Winters had
f0t ">'•*" f«r
*»ck—tiller indifferent
1 Januln nA tht '
ikürH™? 11 th - gave the
rno j*, ns 10,1 jhe whiskey
tot h was
SSSteltog Fishbeck,
to t» be impossible
without play P r °Perly
*4 to^r* i H ° ht> was hook
Palubicki be
ADd Wlt h the heat
.^L COnseious °° u,d
'»gating an J^ A f ter inves
W Ms cuHl-. eXaminatin g
lht (out ,. 108 -; Was satisfied,
^ had ^e
^ Tl r the
was brought
* nd maX tL ?r Ubli ^t) stuff
•ntii ^ w be Herald simmer
oppress an ^1,^ home to
theje. mbarrass -»*g in
wuJXJ? 1 ] hat 9uite a
will kel ? and
Ï 10 Urform«? 0 e ' at a 8014
Can didacy an ÏÏf Cement
fr»«? was not ^ ° OUnty
v! w,t H his ooiH? *| 0 su «»8s
Üi u 1 case * 1&8t
to havp k thlB time.
Gen. bay* he
ta Wltta» a
5
to
In
the Act of Mar-ti ». IIT»
FARM BOARD SURRENDERS
• ••4
Red Scare Is "Red Herring" Across the Trail of Unemployment
Declares Senator Wheeler
Rebuking Police Brutalities
LaFollette Says Industrialists
are Cutting Wages and
Laying Off Men Contrary to Promises Made to Hoov
er. Wagner Says Construction Contracts Decrease
and Jobless Figures Faked. -
-
By HERBERT LITTLE
United Press Staff Correspondent.
Special to Producers News.
Washington, March 3 UP — Sen. B. K. AVheeler of
Montana, speaking before the United States Senate this
afternoon in reference to the serious unemployment situ
ation threatening the industrial foundations of the nation
and forerunning one of the worst economic depressions
u the history of the country, denounced the brutal
P 0 '"* ^P ress i°n of unemployment demonstrations
in l>ew Y ork and other places, and ridiculed
Matthew Woll's "Red scare" statement that the Rus
slans had sent $1,250,000
to the Communists of Am- :
1
stuff was for the purpose of
:l"r?he he trän d of he une£
i, rOSS me tra11 or unem '
ployment.
trouble in
i
erica to foment trouble, and
asserted the "red scare
• »
He said the
America
j
was j
caused by lack of work and
i
i
j
During the debate on uenmploy
ment and "red scare"; S* 1 «- ^a
I Follette, republican, Wisconsin,
1 charged that some of the nation's
j I.;(]u?tiiallstc have violated their
promises to President Hoover by
laying off men and cutting wages,!to
recently.
Laying Off M*en.
Information is coming in that
many concerns are cutting their !
wages, and that the number of j
workers without jobs is increas
not by agitators.
LaFollette Speaks
j
ing, La Follette said. He charged |
(Continued on Last Page) ;
Wise Girls," Laughin Hit,
Is Work of Great
Stage Family
<<
The troubles of a man with
daughters to marry, and of a
plumber with ambitions, make
Wise, Girls," coming to the Or
pheum Theatre, a talking picture
of great comic importance. High
ly successful as a stage play, this
domestic comedy of J. C. and El -1
liott Nugent has greater breadth
and scope in film form. It is not
confined to the Bence home but
spreads out through the neighbor
hood. It brings the laughs not in
any forced manner, but simply
and naturally, because it tells of
simple and natural people.
Elliott Nugent more than lives
up to the advance reports on his
work as "Kempy James," while J.
C. Nugent is a composite picture
of millions of worried fathers.
Roland Young carries still further
the comic reputation he has gain
ed in M e t r o-Goldwyn-Mayer's
"The Unholy Night." Excellent
performances are also given by
Clara Blandick, Norma Lee, James
Donlan, Leora Spellman and Mar
ion Schilling. E. Mason Hopper
did a splendid job of direction. The
picture will be at the Orpheum
Theatre Sunday, Monday and
Tuesday.
..
Judge S. E. Paul Calls Special
Term of the District Court
Will Convene Wednesday, March 25th, to Try Crimina
Calendar of Five Numbers. Jury Drawn But List Not
Yet Published.
Judge Paul, in chambers Mon
day afternoon, responding to the
requst of County Attorney Grant
Bakewell, entered a formal order
for a special term of court to try
a short criminal calendar of five
numbers
A jury panel of 76 names was
drawn, which has not yet been re
leased for publication. It will ap
pear in these columns next week
or the week after,
given for withholding the list, is:
for the public good.
It is reported that County At
torney Bakewell pressed hard for
a special term at this particular
time, in spite of the inclemency
of the weather and the difficulties
confronting the jurymen in coming
to the county seat thru the snow.
The reason given is that he want
ed "to try the 'Nig* Collins-Fish
beck case as soon as possible, and
while sentiment is hot.
A great many people express
the belief that there Is a lot of
politics connected with the calling
of a special court term at this
The reason
yy
FARM MARKETING
MEETINGS AT LAKE
AND PLENTYWOOD
At the present time farmers
throughout the northwest states
are particularly interested in the
operation of the Federal Farm
Board and their grain marketing
program. The question forewoot
in the rviindr* of many farmers is
how are they going to take ad
vantage of the benefits, set forth
in the Agricultural Marketing Act.
In order that the farmers in this
county may have the opportunity
get this information, two meet-1
ings have been scheduled, at which
time Mr. Paul Carpenter, Agricul
tural Economist for Montana, will
explain in detail the progress that'
the Farm Board has made in the'
of various marketing
agencies, als» the steps that a
f arm er must take to market his
produce through the marketing
machinery set up under the super
vision of the Federal Farm Board.
Mr. Carpenter will also speak on
the Price Outlook for various ag
ricultural commodities dealing not
only with the coming season, but
with the long time trend.
The first meeting will be held
in the Theatre building at Medi
cine Lake, March 12 at 2:00 P. M.
The second meeting will be held
(Continued on Last Page) !
*
*
Notice to Property Holders
and Taxpayers of Sheri
dan County
* You will not receive any *
* assessment blanks by mail *
* this year. The Board of Coun- *
* ty Commissioners have asked *
* me to use Field Deputies to *
* come to your place for your *
* assessments and check your *
* property. When weather and *
* road conditions are favorable *
* to travel you can look for the *
* assessor any day. Be prepared *
* to give him a complete list of *
* all your property as it was on *
* March 3, 1930, thereby avoid- *
* ing any unnecessary delay *
* and additional expense for the *
* Asessor. *
O. A. ASPELUND, *
Sheridan County Assessor. *
*
*
*
*
time, instead of waiting for e
regular term next June,^ saymg
that the matter of certain of the
trials, may be used for political
campaign purposes, and rf delayed
until June, it wa s possible that
the time available for its use be
fore the primaries would be alto
office."
(Continued on Last Page)
Judge Bourquin
Roasts Attorney
In Seattle Court
Seattle, March 1. — Federal
Judge Gerge M. Bourquin leveld
caustic remarks at prohibition en
forcement and fined William E.
McMilan 60 cents on a plea ^ of
guilty to possession of a half
pint of whisky. The Jurist said,
"A United States attorney who
doesn't know better than to clut
ter up the courts with cases of
this kind has no business holding
i *
Times Have Changed
Dïawn for LABOR by John M. Baer
*
w
>>
.
j||i
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REMEMBER,6
^3 WHEN THOSE FE .
V7 WERE CALLING '
DAK6EROUS RA
FOR TALKING UK
\
i THE. Si.-.
k »5 ON T
\ OTHER FE
Wife'
m 1
I
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m We've got to
WORÖÄNlZli A UNION
OR WE'LL BE
DESTROYED.
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TV
The above cartoon by John M.
jj aer w ho won fame as a Non-par
nuhliration cartoon
. . . ^
»st. vividly portrays the change
that has taken place along Main
street in the past decade. The
League speakers and the Produc
ers News who have argued on
every occasion for organization of
the farmers, have often called at
tention of the small business men
that their prosperity depended up
on the prosperity of the farmers
i
CORPORATIONS RUN
WESTERN FARMS
By Jack Hearly, Federated Press
Ten years ago 30,000 to 40,000
harvest workers rode the freights
from Chicago, Minneapolis and
other midwestern cities out to the
wheat fields of the Dakotas and
Kansas. Last year 8,030 migra
tories went into the wheat belt
acre
age, there will be yet fewer—ac
tually no "hands" are needed.
Such is the revolutionary nature
of changes that have come over
the farm lands of the interior, as
seen by C. M. Harger wntmg in
the Annalist, financial weekly ofj
the New York Times. "Ten years
Ä
atively simple. The producer till
ed his acres by practically the
same system as did his father.
Power farming, a movement simi
lar to that now transforming the
face of the Soviet land, is respon
sihle for the sadden and complete
change m the midwest, says Har
* er '
-!
VERN ANKERMAN IN
cr Dim tc rnMiMTIAN
SERIOUS CONDITION
The wheat combine, manned by
(Continued oo Last Paffe)
Verm Anker man, well known
blacksmith of this city, is in a
very critical condition at the Sher
idan Memorial hospital, where
h°pes . re held f« r his
Mr. Ankerman was taken sick
about a month ago, and apparent
ly was convalescing nicely, when
he had a relapse and was rushed
to the hospital, a victim of pneu
monia, which is reported to have
graduated into quick consumption.
His sister, Miss Tina Ankerman,
was called from Medicine Lake,
where she is teaching the first of
this week, and is in constant at
tendance at his bedsides, together
with a trained nurse «nd Dr. Star
ken.
The many friends of Vem hope
that he may still conquer over the
grim reaper and again regain his
health.
and workers. But the little busi- '
ness men refused to listen. They |
supported their enemies and pun
ished their friends. Time has,
brought about a condition among !
small business men when they,
realize they must organize against j
big business. i
Organized labor and organized j
farmers can't help but laugh, tho i
sorry. !
But we are afraid they, like the!
small farmers, are doomed. Like I
l the small farmers they will go i
DEADLINES
p. £ ^ ev '' ^
Ur. INaarziger, brain spe
cialist, left here today in air
, c D
plane enroute tor outte,
Mont., to attend former
J^ge George Bourquin. Jr..
son of Federal Judge Bour
_ii_, ;ii
Çl um > who. IS. critically ill
from cranial injury sustain
^ handball game,
| 6
ofj
Miami, Fla., March 6.
Prohibition today
recovered four of the eight
rum boats, which
» '
was recaptured Wednesday
in daring bootlegger raid on
® ° . .
government wharf where
they had been tied after cap
jture.
i • . w , ✓
Washington, March 6.—
Senate rejected this after
_ j •
noon, proposed case in oil
and sugar duty increase.
pi
^-nicago, HI.,
Current report that Farm
Boar< j planne( J ; ssue
statement sent wheat one
h a jf to seven-eiffhths of a
* £ s even-eigntns or a
cent higher,
Mar. 6.—
Washington, Mar. 6.—
Chairman Legge announc
ed today that Grain Stabili
zation Corporation will
tinue wheat buying at
ket price whatever quantity
necessary to relieve surplus
and will prevent surprise
decline.
con
mar
broke one after another as the
chain stores backed by huge <;api
tal and unlimited resources
strangle them, and forces them in
to the working class behind the
counters in the chains at small
wages, as the farmers will become
workers on the huge capitalized
farms as the Mexican workers in
the sugar fields. The day of hope
and opportunity is gone forever
fair our boys and girls—only slav
ery faces them. WHAT ARE WE
GOING TO DO ABOUT IT?
HOMESTEAD COUPLE
MARRe 24 YEARS
On Monday night, February 24,
friends of Mr. and Mrs. L. A.
Stout of Homestead, gathered at
their home and helped them cele
brate their 24th wedding anniver
sary. A pleasant evening was
spent and at a late hour the
guests departed for their homes,
leaving with Mr. and Mrs. Stout
numerous lovely gifts, and best
wishes for many happy returns of
the day.
Mr. and Mrs. Stout are well
known and very popular in the
Homestead community and the
Producers News is very glad to
chronicle this happy occasion and
may they have many more of
them.
^ Hall a radio dub wag w
ed to be known as the Plentywood
Radio Club. Officers were elect-;
ed, being as follows: Anton Nel-1
son, president; J. W. McKee, sec-
Iretary, and L. S. Olson, treasurer.
R ay White was appointed chair
man of 016 membership commit
tec and several lieutenants were
appointed to canvass the city for
members. A $2 membership fee
was decided upon and readily paid
by the fans present at the meet
ing as a nucleus for further ex
tension.
Several suggestions were of
fered for the good of the club,
and the most important question
seemed to be that of securing a
qualified trouble man to come to
this city, and inspect it for radio
interference, and to have a local
man go with him, who will learn
the tricks of the trade and who
will then with a trouble detector
be able to take care of the local
troubles throughout the year.
Plentywood Radio Club
Organized Monday Night
At a meeting held Monday ev
ening of this week at the City
An aeon da—UP—The hand that
blew the first whistle of the old
Carroll reduction works in 1884—
the first shelter in Montana—Is
forever stilled with the death, the
other day, of James Thornton, 79.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
PLAINLY SHOWS WHO'S IN
CONTROL AT WASHINGTON
Those Who Live on Labor of Others Finally Prove to
Farmers How Futile It Is to Expect That Capitalist
Government Will Ever Help Producers. Big Business
Behind Speculators Force Secretary of Agriculture to
Issue Edict Which Hamstrings Farm Board Even If It
Ever Intended to Help Grain Growers.
Washington, D. C.—The Federal Farm Board has ap
parently knuckled down to the grain gamblers.
As your correspondent pointed out in other dispatches,
strong pressure has been brought to bear on the farm
board by the United States Chamber of Commerce to quit
monkeying with co-operatives and give the "honest''
business man a chance to make a living.
FOUNDER OF
DAGMAR COLONY
DIED SUNDAY
E. F. Madsen, the founder of
the Dagmar colony, died at his
home in that community Sunday
afternoon after an illness of tw»
weeks duration.
The funeral was held at the
Danish Lutheran church today and
interment .made in the Dagmar
cemetery among his old friends.
Mr. Madsen's daughter, a nurse
at Minot, came home and nursed
her father thru the illness that
terminated in his death.
Besides this daughter he leaves
a son and his wife to mourn his
departure.
Deceased came to the Dagmar
territory in 1905 and looked the
country over and returned to his
home in Iowa. In the spring of
1906 he returned with a colony of
Danes who homesteaded that area.
As a result of his efforts the
whole territory was settled.
Mr. Madsen was quite a distin
guished man. He was a writer of
some note having written for all
of the Danish language papers
published in America. He also has
written several books. Besides his
literary talents he was also an
artist of no mean ability. His
home is full of his paintings.
In the passing of E. F. Madsen
Dagmar loses its most distinguish
ed citizen.
Plentywood Golfers Held
Meeting Monday Night
A meeting of the local golf
club was held last Monady even
ing at the County Agent's office
in the County Library building.
Discussion of preliminary plans
for the 1930 golf season was en
gaged in. Only a fair crowd was
present, and the officers are look
ing for a much larger turnout at
the annual meeting which will be
held Thursday, April 3rd, at tho
City hall.
Wheeler Would Investigate the
Price of Gasoline In Montana
Introduces Resolution Urging Quiz. Asks Attorney
General to Investigate Price Fixing By Big Producers.
Three State Movements Also Under Way.
w ,.- , nB w o , . TTT} *
• March 4.—UP—An
! esrigation of price fixing b>
* as0 " ne c °mP a ™es in Montana
urdax^b^st^at" WhedS^d™'
, öenator wneeIer . aemo
c ^ Montana.
^°, i on . ask< *? t J ie att ?r
general to investigate price
fl . np ai ?f a ®? e<d ^° r immedi
f. te consi derati»n, but the résolu
^ on ^. en ^ over imtil Monday on
the objection of Senator Fess, re
pu ^lî car J' um ?j . , , . .
Whee:1er said he had informa
tl ? n .v^ iat t ? le Standard Chi has fix
e f^ , tae P. n< r® ^ gasoline m his
smaller companies
a r, r Jf, rced the
Standard Oils price levels for
fe H °* being put out of business,
. declared that in spite of the
taat „ e 18 produced and
jefmed in Montana, that state has
highest or pearly the highest
gasoline prices in the country.
THREE MONTANA INVESTI
GATIONS CONTEMPLATED
Helena, March 1.—Three move
ments already are under way to
ward investigations of the
gaso
American capitalism has
been strongly behind the
grain gamblers, represented
the Chamber of Com
^ in their effort8 to
p revent . . the farn ? bo,rd
from giving actual assist
ance to the grain raisers.
As far as the American farmers
are concerned in your correspond
ent's opinion they might as well
kiss a long good bye to expecta
tions of relief from the farm
board. Farmers are not idiotg
we may let the following story
speak for itself;
Chicago, March.— The
stabilization corporation,
of the Federal Farm board,
ordered to discontinue paying the
(Continued on pag-e Bight)
i
I
so
wheat
adjunct
Was
Huge New York Dem
onstrations Quite Orderly
Huge New York demonstrations
for unemployment organized by
the Communist Party
ducted under such discipline
dirions that
characterized them
were con
con
newspaper reports
as order; y.
Here is a U. P. dispatch cb
gives a bird's eye view of what
is taking place all over the world
as we go to press;
Unemployment demonstratio
staged today in industrial and
population centers of Europe are
reported to have been
n s
accompa
nied by outbreaks and disorder.
London police and municipal offi
cers beaten and demonstrators
trampled under foot.
Four are wounded at Reballo,
Spain.
Sir were injured when fifteen
hundred demonstrators rushed the
police at Vienna, Austria.
As result of repression orders
of Tardieau, silent strike envelop
ed Paris.
Four were arrested at Water
bury, Conn., as result of attempt
ed attack on city hall; five were
injured and eight arrested in
fights before Detroit city hall.
In Washington an attempted
parade ended in a free-for-all
fight and eight spectators were
unseated by two demonstrators
seeking to talk.
Fighting within ranks, five
thousand communists sent two to
hospital while many are jailed.
_, .
hn e p nce situation in Montana,
The first was the formation of
organization for that purpose at
£vT' .a^ts s f that
bodv have been in the field for
some weeks. The next wag a res
elation of the county commission
ers at the recent meeting of their
state association. They asked a
legislative investigation of gat
lm e prices. At the same time
Governor Erickson announced re-'
ceipt of a letter from United
States Senator Walsh in which he
said he had asked the United
States department of justice to
look into the matter of alleged
stifling of competition through
price agreements between the
principal sales agencies operating
i n Montana,
A legislative investigation was
made by the assembly of 1927
an
Havre—UP—Whether or not A.
H. Perkins will be granted a gas
franchise by the city of Havre
will be determined by the elector
ate at a special city election May
27 th.

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