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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 16, 1930, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

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Drive on Barrier Beach Off Virginia and North Carolina Coasts
acA Proposed Memorial to Wright Brothers at Kitiyhawk
-.■dons
Planned to Re
liar
staDilization I
most j
-.ana ;
permitting « j
VA - rue
Hill the
world ?
Devi)
Kill
01
Ol
„ mountain
movin c
^ K;ttyb &wK
N C
of the pro
0&
case
as the
iiseO
The
tc
memoria)
recently authorized
" resulted in a project
morial a Iona
the ;
K «
national
Brothers
ha?
m '■
«
Congress t
i highway
, oarrier
to the me
mich follow?
:
oeach w
Carolina
highway will oe one |
tarular drives I
r hern'll whim !
coasts
c
and
proposed
. world's most spec
e the name
ID*
c
-, from the great
ground? ol million? o:
r Ship s Bay and Cur
Croatan and
m'
V
t.ne jeean
tarâtes
:ns
;
?
Birds
^..atic
rttuoh
r 1 e
A 1 0 e m a
sound?
tinrent pre
Kill Devil Hill and an av
sei aside as a na
serve oî 500 acres
?
n eove
r
g e ld will oe
monument
Qjffhtvay plan
e until the cl
tfhen h wa5
r "T H1 n had been
hcast 3
ts
did not neconu
o=e of
c
T'r.e
the past
:ved that Kill
fe-'
made immune tr
Caotain John
V
constructing Quartermas
A to whom was entrust
.. k of chaining Kill Devil Hit:
hill with wood mold and
past
ioved an nch
the •
■■
V
|C '
six
ti
the
Dunns
nas not n
|>5 vear? Kill Devil HU,
I«« cl sand nsma J
» -««ere or.se had move"
01,1 /cnutl ■-vrstcrlv direction
3 W Nmtheast gales It
^ station
;•
c
n the pa
ft!
feet
jjn feet U>
Si im «» "**
w " ne proposed Wr)
the summit of this shift
strong
ible to nave
■lit Brothers
kept
nal on
inc pyramid £ sa ' i0
Oc toöcr
M
1328 Capt Gilman
more than tw*
S;nee
s covered an area
tiicle around the oase
well as a large part oi
ts-
feet
bundied
.. .v,e hill as
Northern and Eastern sides with ,
ï J* sold two inches deep in which j
planted vigorous native and im
r d crasses Fourteen acres nave
<wn at a cost oi S20.000 ano
has appropriated $7.600 to
the remaining 12 acres
success has led the th Car- :
goad Department to authorize 1
the barrier
art
I
I
p. -
o!iü
Boulevard along
Ljct from Nag's
Kill Devil Hill, to Klttyhawk
s Head is already connected with
Island by a new road and
I âne
Head in the South
pa-1
Bosnoke
t)„dce. while construction will soon
^commence on another bridge be
Point Harbor, on the mainland.
tween
icd Kittyhawk.
To complete the project. North
citizens advocate a road
Csroüna
jî«rth along the beach from Kltty
the Virginia State line, a
hawk to
distance of 33 miles, while Virginians
are planning a connecting road from
the North Carolina-Virginia line to
Virginia Beach, 20 miles. Congress
oar. Lankford of Virginia wants the
government to take over the whole
read project and has introduced a bill
into Congress to that effect.
Plans are now being agitated to ex
tern this ocean-going road further
down the carrier beach from Nag's
Head. across Oregon Inlet, past Cape
gitteru serose Hatteraa Inlet, then
1 over Ocracoke Inlet and on to Moore
head City, a distance of 207 miles
I from Virginia Beach.
f The starting point of the highway
trill Be the famous Virginia Beach,
l me of the most distinctive seaside
I resorts in America. Here
I ihe magnificent Cavalier Ec
I manal project built by public spirited
seated
com
T\lVr OApl ft 1 IQT 1
lllulu jUvlliLlul
lllulu jUvlliLlul
.
l/llTF FOIVIPI FTFvk'
Uvil» vV/lili liLi 1 LllJ
M ... _/MiiFirt
IN rllVVrK
HI * vr î f till
_
Ptrty Gains 14,073 Members_
Wages Great Fight for Com
plet« Disarmament.
Cupenhagen—The latest annual
ttport of the Danish Social-Demo
trjtic Party shows that 1929 ha«?!'
I». a red vm not onlv m view
1 of the election results but also for
lie organization of the Party.
During the
.afl
^"
1
"t
Wear
Rayon
f]
Underthings
For Smooth Lines!
For Practicality!
For Thriftiness!
Chemises,
Panties and Vests
expect your new clothe*
smoothly without soft clinging
underthings beneath! That's why this
ov-lustre, firmly woven rayon is ideal
VOur spring and summer wardrobe.
e cost is small, and they
»earl 1
Bloomers,
can't
to fit
wear and
49c
each
Chemises, Bloomers,
Panties and Vests
Wme ebsticity that makes these
Bff
l
it
The
finu. r ^° n un( ^ ert hings cling to your
& : pr ^ them ^ck into shape
r^^r You tub them! The mate
0
isctn**
die#
f*
SU pp^ m P rove( l rayon—low-lustre
mi
0*
•ucv „ * •*" not only are
•Hngl ^ pri " d> but lon 8'
n
0
98c
•acK
a
4C.PENNEY CO
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TASLC7 /!no STOHe efARK/HO THÉ
w He>ee THe took
-rue Aik 4 o od d o \
SPOT
■^o
c fieo\A/o o* .
p
citizens of Norfolk.
it has its own i
riding club, its own swimming pool. I
.tnd two splendid 13-ho!c golf courses '
A concrete promenade two miles Iona
skirts the sea
many fine hotels accommodates 2Z 0
The resort with
vlslto
to the ^ri"lrt uroth
l! V reached from th<
Highway Prom Norfolk one w
atlle 10 rcach famous Virginia 3
a populous resort with fine r,a
By 'his new ocean nigh way tc Ea
tvhawk and Nag's Head the mem::-.a.
rs will oc ey
Atlanrir Co'sta
o\
n .
t '' ld boating facilities and golf In;
In 45 minutes H n re ;s 'oentea
tilt
M*i
X
i
m
STS
;i
à
v<
m
THE emze MHNINC, OSS/OFi FOU.
TU£ WPIGU-' BXOTUS K£ NEMOOlAl
celebrated Cavalier Hotel, the Prin
cess Anne Country Club, and the
Cavalier Golf and Country Club.
Every mile of the trip will be of in
terest. The barrier beach was ac
counted a wild and dangerous'coast In
the early days Nag's Head, in fact,
received Its name from a quaint old
custom of tying a light to a horse's
head and leading It up and down the ;
beach after nightfall to lure ships to j
their destruction. Going South from 1
Virginia Beach you pass eight or ten
life saving stations. The State of Vlr
glnla rifle range is the first point
South, then the Dam Neck life sav
ing station, the Croatan Club, a hunt
Ing reserve of wealthy men. You pass
Back Bay. North Bay, Currituck
Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Croatan
Sound, all famous wild fowl winter
feeding grounds, and around these
waters are numerous gunning clubs
owned and operated by many wealthy
men.
You will travel on a fringe of sand,
far from the mainland. Prom North
ship increased by 14,073, so that
number of organized members
is now 163,193. All members are
m dividual members. There is no
collective membership of trade
un i° ns or other organizations. The
membership includes 54,034 worn
en (or 33%). All parts of the
country—country districts as well
as towns—have contributed to :he
incmase.
num t >er of Social-Democrat
ic branches has also increased, so
that the Party now includes 1,064
branches as against communes,
,. , . , , 1 4 ««, ■. „
i Wh " h ' S b ' 5 ' ; . b
seen that the Party organlzatlon
1 ver Y widely spread, and that
' the Party is approaching its aim
CAPAVAfJ OF
AciToMoen.es
er kill oev/L ,
Hu l, k / rry J
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to South you pass Little Island Life
Saving Station. False Cape Life Sav
lug Station—many a ship was strand
ed there In early days, believing it
was entering Hampton Roads—.Wash
Woods Life Saving Station, Penny
Hill, Whale Head Light. Poyner Hill
Life Saving Station. Coffey Inlet Life
Saving Station, though the Inlet from
which It took Its name has vanished,
Prom Nag's Head, of course, you can
cross over to Roanoke Island where
was bom Virginia Dare, America's
first native white child. Oregon In
let, on the way to Cape Hatteras, will
be the end of the route until It is
bridged. There, as In the other passes
you will find splendid fishing, blue
fish, channel, bass, drum, sea trout,
/
of one branch in every commune,
In Govt. For a Year
This organizational success in
the first year or me Social-Demo
cratic-Radical Coalition Govern
ment is of course of the greatest
political importance. It repre
gents a clear vote of confidence
for the Government and encour -
agement for the work of organi
, zation. It may be assumed that
it will also give food for thought
to the opponents of the Govern
ment in Parliament.
; . Events that may be o± great
importance have taken place m
Denmark in the last few weeks in
th e sphere of disarmament. After
the elections there was a solid
majority for the Government pro
1 posai, both in the House of Com
mons , Folketing) — at least 77
votes against 68 —and among the
electors to this House. As against
this there is a majority of four
votes against the Government pro
posai in the Upper House (Land
! sting). It has therefore been im
i possible for the present to carry
i the proposal. Under the Consti
I tution it was also impossible to
j dissolve the Upper House and to
! attempt to secure a majority of
! this House through a new general;*
I election. Such a .«solution can only
i happen in 1933 or 1934. On the
other hand one-half of the seats
in the Upper House will be re
newed by ordinary elections in the
aulumn of 1932 (that is, in
years) and if the Upper House
majority had by then "buried" the
disarmament" proposal or perhaps
flatly rejected it, there would be
favorable opportunity of securing,
a majority at these elections _
ready, because among other things
the electors of the former Govern
ment Party (the Ribera! Peasant
Party called "Venstre") are by.
means enthusiastic for . collabora
tion with the. Conservatives in
sphere of military policy.
Action Is Delayed
2%
This situation caused the leaders
of this Party to begin private!
negotiations with the Government,
a few weeks ago. The Government
has always expressed its willing
ness to negotiate on details as
long as the principle of the Gov
ernment proposal is "^«tarned,
and the negotiations 00 p
this basis. "
The negotiations were broken
off, however, after a few weeks,
principally because agreement
could not be secured on whether a i
form of universal compulsory ser
vice should remain, or whether
the personnel should be recruited,
in the manner proposed by
Government. •
The news of this new political
situation naturally aroused actual
terror in Conservative and mili
tary circles.
It is impossible to say for the
moment what further develop-'
ments will take place. 1 he 1 ar
liamentory sessions wi enane
fore Easter, and it will therefore
be impossible m the circumstance^
to complete the dissions on the
disarmament proposal m the Folk
eting. There is no ham, however
rock and numerous other species
Of course, the biggest sight of all
will be Kill Devil Hill, that strange
peripatetic mountain from whose
flanks on December 17. 1903. Orville
Wright flew under the power of his
own machine for twelve momentous
seconds, and took flying from the
mythology of Icarus Into the realm of
accomplished fact. Returning from
Kill Devil Hill and Klttyhawk. motor
ists will be able to take the new
bridge now under construction to
Point Harbor on the mainland, and
drive thirty miles to the Atlantic
Coastal Highway, where the highway
leads to Elizabeth City, N. C- fifteen
ment proposal will be laid before,
the Folketing again. Then it will,
"x
miles South, and Norfolk. Va„ twen
ty-two miles North.
soon be shown whether new nego
tiations may lead thepi to a satis
factory solution of this important
question, or whether its solution
must be fought for in a few years'
time.
" "
New York Laughs At
(
* New York, May 6 . *
* and raucous laughter is New
. York > s answer to Grover •
* (Goofey) Whalen's latest ef- *
* f or t to crash the front pages *
i * 0 f the daily press.
* The asinine police commis- *
Police Commissioner's
Latest Publicity Stunt
j * sioner, not content with play
j * i n g th% role of imbecile, when
' * he brolce up an unemployment
j * parade on March 6 th, now
j ♦ comes out with a collection of
♦ forged documents which he al
i * leges proves that the Soviet
: * Trading Agency in New York,
j * which purchased $150,000,000
I * 0 f American goods last year,
* j s responsible for all the
1 * strikes, that have taken place
j n the United States during
* the past several years,
| * Even the capitalist press
j * tho usually willing to swallow
1 *
* anything hostile to the Soviet
* Union, is paying little atten
tion to Whalen's publicity
1 * stunt
* Soviet representatives are
I * demanding an investigation
a ! * w yd c h' Whalen shuns, fearing
* that he would be compelled
* t 0 discolse the identity of the
j * f or gers.
-1 ♦ Business men who are car
<« rying on a profitable trade
1 * w jth Russia, regard Whalen as
* a pgyeopathic case who should
* k e g. en j. Bellevue for obser
i * vation.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Butte> Mont May 7 _UP—An-1
other step towards complete eman
cipation has-been reached by wo
man! If f r i end husband wants to
borrow, make him sign a promis
gor y no ^ e before doling out the
i ca gh. If he fails to pay the debt
bring suit. You'll get judgment,
; Nettie Gleason had the foresight
obtain a promissory note from
the;her spouse before she loaned himj
$400. When he didn't discharge
his monetary obligations on
appointed day, she brought suit
j and was awarded a verdict,
Helena-UP-Popularity of far-'
mers * cooperative gasoline and oil
1 dispensing corporations is spread-,
j inf? st eadily throughout the state.'
i SSUance of a the other
, day t0 the Farmers Union 0
Circ i e Montana marked the for-
matl0n of the 4 ^ farm ers' oil
- organization.
Here's Helluva Note!
Wife Collects Loan
From Her Husband
the
UNITED STATES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
ONCE FAVORED FEDERAL AID TO FARMERS
' St. Paul, May 14.—The résolu
tion adopted by the United States
Chamber of Commerce condemning
ne government for having gone
into the grain business seems to
contain a flaw or two as far as
; its origin is concerned.
Less than three years ago a
large percentage of those who are
now opposed to the cooperative
practice in producing and market
mg agricultural produce were ar
I
, dent advocates of that very prin
! ciple. Evidently the sudden change
j in their attitude is prompted by
the fear that the farmer shall con
. trol the profits which were form -1
erly pocketed by the grain trade, j
As a matter of fact, there is no
, ?ound reason why the profits that
result from the marketing of a
product should not belong to the
j producers of the product,
j In a statement given to the
j United States Chamber of Com
1 merce convention Alexander Legge
1 s aid, "There has been considerable
evidence the last several months
that entirely too many of youn
members were for the principle of
: roc,"eration only so long as
didn't work.
Charges Snap Judgment
The Chamber has exercised snap
I mdgment in adopting the resolu
J Ton v/h'-h it has. It condemns,
the Agricultural Marketing Act
'cspite the fact that it has been
I
ï
it
in effect less than one year and
that operations under it have been
conducted over a still shorter per
led of t me. In an effort to hin
der its chances of success trie
Chamber appropriately suggests
that a study be made of the ques
tion of vA to agriculture,
The National Industrial Confer
Board. Inc , a business men's
organization, conducted such a
study in 1026 and arrived at the
conclusive that agriculture was in
need of prompt aid. This survey
given wide publicity and pub
ilished in hook form. At a later
; date the Business Men's Commis
; s on on Agriculture, composed of
i i epresentatives of the National
Industrial Conference Board and
of the Chamber of Commerce of
i the United States, published still
! another volume dealing with the
{agriculture situation and suggest
! ing measures for its improvement,
i Two of the suggestions presented
by the Business Men's Commission
on Agriculture were:
on^e
; '"as
"1. That co-operation among
: farmers in the production process
w iU gi ve many advantages similar
th^e obtained in the manufac
^ ' industry through large
Pc .« e Production. Such operation
will greatly facilitate the mar
feting of farm products, since
! many marketing problems are
| the last analysis founded on pro
duction and can be solved only
I the producing process,
« 2 . That it (cooperation) y
i however, of great value for the
' marketing of farm products also.
I Whenever the concentration
1 selling agencies can improve
quality or vendibility of a product,
or can distribute it more nearly
with the existing
Advantages of Co-Operation
correspondence
j
!
;
'
j
1
j
1
j
;
*{
! »
Outstanding Features of the New Ford
BfD.il
J
Adjustable front seats in most bodi^«
Four Houdaille double-acting hydraulic shock absorbed
Chrome silicon alloy valve
Torquc-tuhe drive .
Extensive use of fine steel forgings and electric weldin g.
Triplex shatter-proof glass windshield. *
Quick acceleration.
Reliability and long life.
i
Choice of attractive colors.
New streamline bodies.
Fully enclosed, silent four-wheel brakes.
Bright, enduring Rustless .Steel for many exterior metal parts.
Chrome alloy transmission gears and shafts.
Aluminum pistons.
Three-quarter floating rear axle.
More than twenty ball and roller bearings.
Five steel-spoke wheels.
Low first cost.
Ease of control.
Good dealer servies#
55 to 65 miles an hour.
Economy of operation.
1
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•XV
THE NEW FORD TUDOR SEDAN
the
Roadster .... $435 Coupe ....
Phaeton .... $440 Tudor Sedan .
Sport Coupe
De Luxe Coupe . . $550 Convertible Cabriolet $6-45
Three-window Ford or Sedan $625
. $650 Town Sedan
$500
(
. $500
V.
De Luxe Sedan
. . $670
. . $530
AU prices f. o. b. Detroit, plus freight and delivery. Bumpers and spare tire extra, at lote cost.
Universal Credit Company plan of time payments offers another Ford economy •
Ford Motor Company
demand, or can eliminate waste in
the marketing process, cooperative
selling associations offer opportu
nities of great service to farmers
as well as to consumers.''
These were the conclusions
drawn less than three years ago by
several leading members of the
United States Chamber of Com
rnerce, who were recently instru
i mental in framing and adopting
j
j .
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e
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say SERVE AT ONCE
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W9X
The minute an omelet is hot from the pan, it is puffed up,
tender ... at its hest.... And the minute vegetables are fresh
from the garden, all their flavor, all their juice are at their
high point.
The way to have white wax beans while they are tender;
and carrots when so crisp they cook creamy before they are
creamed . . . the w r ay to have all vegetables at their climax
time of freshness, is to pick them from a garden of your own.
And the way to grow vegetables approaching perfection is to
plant Ferry's purebred Seeds.
These seeds arq perfected the way breeders perfect cattle.
A Ferry-hred tomato is no more like an ordinary tomato than
Ferry's sweet corn is like horse corn. Find Ferry's purebred
Seeds at the "store around the corner." And write for Ferry's
Seed Annual. This gives you 73 years' experience in gardens
before you start—news of mulch paper—and even of belter
ways to cook vegetables. D. M. Ferry & Co., Detroit, Michigan.
P. S.-THE GARDENER HAS NO SECOND CHANCE. PLANT THE BEST.
m
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kiifl
FekrVS
purv brad
SEEDS
c
; - Perrys
Want freth lima
bean » with Sunday
roasts? Eleven len
der varieties are in
this Annual. Only
purebred seeds can
produce their rieh,
buttery flavor.
>
yy
F EKKY'S
d SEEDS
t,
pure
r e
■v
•s
the resolution condemning f he Ag
ricultural Marketing Act.
The object of the cooperative
! marketing movement is not to de
stroy other business structures
i that are the result of
constant upbuilding,
marketing systems become obso
lete and are discarded because of
its development, then history is
only repeating itself again.
years of
older
u
J Great Falls—UP—A half mil
lion dollars worth of city bonds;
$100,000 of sewer bonds and $400,
000 of water bonds will be sold by
the Great Falls city dads,
BABY CHICKS
Order now, we ship when yon
want them. 100% alive delivery
guaranteed. High quality Nor.
them hahy chicks.
White and Brown Leghorns,
911.00 per 100
Barred Bocks, Buff Orpingtons,
White Wyandot tes, Beds
$14.00 P«I 100
Terms: $3.00 per 100 deposit
with order and balance C. O. D
pins transportation charges.
DAKOTA HATCHERIES
Harvey, N. D.
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