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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, May 30, 1930, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

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ant
Ads
i«»
w
Ads in this column are charged
for at the rate of two cents for
each word.
.... , ,
Minimum charge for
any ad 26 cents. Remittance *Wd
accompany copy for the advertise
ment
-—
DISTRIBUTOR WANTED—Large
manufacturer of nationally|
l^TÄf eXtae "Ä
retail ^d wholiale trade to
Plentywood territory. Steady,
repeat ordere. No competition
This business should net party
between *7,600.00 and $10,000.00
ctallv^resnonfdhie ta^arr* l^Tooo
to $1 60tKm wort h° of oo.f h
a ™ erchan -
district shortly. Write '"Manu
facturer, 767 Milwaukee Ave
nue, Chicago. Give phone for
interview.
Dr\i>r r, ., „ ,
FOR RENT—Residence, well lo
cated in Plentywood, furnace
heat. A. J. Moore, Plentywood.
8-t3-c
WANTED FOB PASTURE—Horses
and Cattle, on Berg Astrup's farm
nine miles northeast of Antelope.
Horses $1.50 and cattle $1.00 per
month. Laurence Sund.
_
FOR SALE—Registered Marquis
ȀTLik
cine Lake, Mont. Melvin Gran
_ ud
43-tf-c
DIIV ... x .
BUY Minnesota Standard Accred
Red chicks, postpaid, per 100:
Leghorns, Ancona^ $11; Rocks,
Orpington, Reds, Mmorcas, Wy
andottes, $14; Brahmas, Giants,
$15; Assorted Lights $9; Heavies:
$12; Bronze Turkey Poults $60,
after June 10th $60. Bopp Hat
chery, Fergus Falls, Minn. 6-t5cl»c
.,,7 V — urTdnunlîSïl
BI R4 P v mrK?f HArC ?5, D
BAP CHI( KS from one of the
largest hatcheries in Montana,
Our eegs are secured from the
best flocks S in 11 Northeastern
&L hocks in iNortneastern
Montana. This year we can
gtve you the best of service.
Chicks taken from incubator in
morning will arrive at your sta-!
tion same day. This means that
a p?Lt" T'Ä- order
early to be assured of your
chicks when vou want them Our'
incubator G is
sion of an expert, which assures
you of strong, healthv babv
chicks that live and grow into
egg layers. Wolf Point Hatch
ery, Wolf Point, Montana.
l-9t-p
9-ltp
OATS POB SAD
Fifty «ents per
bushel. Atlantic Elevator Compa
ny, Dooley. Mont. 9-3tp
FASTVBE— For 15 or 20 head of
cattle. $1 a month. Plenty of wa
ter. Emma Savage,
9-2tp
FOR SALE — Second generation
Newland seed flax. Geo. Over
by, Plentywood, Mont. 8-t2-c
FOR 'SALE—Reserve restaurant.
See D. C. Murk, Reserve, Mont.
8-t2-c
rx
1
FOR
PROTECTl ON
AGAINST
FIRE. LIGHTNING. CY
CLONE, WINDSTORM
„ get a
POLICY
-IN THE
NORTHWESTERN
NATIONAL
FOR RATES SEE "JERRY*
THE LITTLE AGENT
Call or Address
G. G. POWELL
Plentywood
Montana
«iiiiii«niiim«m«iiiiiiii»iniiiiiiiiiiiiininuiiiiii,ii,ii l H»H ll |, l i I i lll | llll im, l „ IMI , II , IIM , llllinillIII|lwl|||||ni||I|1|11I
-
COMING
Next Week
The Biggest
Money Saving Sale
of the Season
JUNE
5 - 6-7
hncJlt
.
ORIGIN
y
iOMt
comrmcHT 1917 cNiTto oouc
i
Plentywood Drus
The REXALL Store
C. M. UNDHJEM, Prop.
PLENTYWOOD
■ninnniniiiMiii l ,ii„ IHIniIIII)|l)I||iHt||||||H||J|M|1||)||1)iH(||f)i||||Hw|w|)|M)w|j
MIIIIIIIIIIIIIMlniMllllliliiiiiiH
WOLF POINT BOY,
| 12 . IS KILLED WHILE
PLAYING WITH GUN
Discharged
Accidentally
While Lad Holds It Behind Him.
Gun Brought From Williston
Night Before.
Rifle
Wolf Point, May 26.—George,
12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs.
1Jame? M> Allen accidentally shot
himself a .22 caliber rifle
I Sunday afternoon. He lived only
a few minutes afterwards. With
aevera ' ° ther to age
f ™ m . 9 U - ** had been ehootmg
' Entertag the Moran home later,
Wa f f , Ä a ro
r, , fle .' >eh "i l h ' m ' ÿsetorg
ol lua , h « ad - } oh ?.
'"""tes were'
Moran and Woodbury boys were
eating a lunch at the kitchen table
and the Dudley boy was on a bed
lookin * at thc comic scct!ori of
The
newspaper.
The verdict at the coroner's in
quest today was that George Al
len had been killed by the acci
dental discharge of a rifle in his
own hands. He had not been in
the habit of handling firearms, his
father said at the inquest. The
rifle was one that the boy's uncle
had brought from Williston the
night before. George took the gun
surreptitiously from the home of
his grandmother, Mrs. Elizabeth
Allen. Two of the other boys
mustered up enough money to buy
six boxes of cartridges. The boy's
family did not know that he had
taken the gun until after the acci
den t.
„ „
Staff- ^*I!l 0 jy T .r| terR0n
podbye to all OU r classmates and
; friends that we have made during
ihe past 12 years.
It is not Without regret that we
! are leaving this pleasant life for a
/«ore difficult and loss smooth path
j "urseTvcs' to a «Tatar Scm. "To
know we will meet with many de
I tours, rough stretches and hidden
ponies ^ve may have encountered
: •'SdJrSSS
! ;) ui. k to show us our mistake und
were noon on the smooth •>«>■
"" 11 ' s som * *°
! When we leave here all of us will
be . only on e Q f the crowd," we will
have to make new friends, expert
ence and rough treatment will
change our -Tj ews - an< * me 5 d a ? r
! ways we Wll j m iss the friendly
j guidance that we have had since our
JBdhjjd and the world «a . whole
as e p r e haps ï ' towll
0 f chores— it will be work, hard
( work where we have to hang on like
Tn'lT^T.T £ St *STS
i school. All of these thngs will not
be 80 pleasant perhaps but we will
Rri S^urï
dividual democracy.
So we wish to thank everyone of
!
that we, the Chu-s of 1930, might
graduate from this dear old school.
-
\
j
I
School Jfofa*
FOR SALE—1927 Master Four
Door Buick, good condition, $300.
Inquire of Producers News,
86-tf-c
LEGAL NOTICES
In the matter of the Estate of
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
by the undersigned Administra
trix of the Estate of Peter Kisler,
deceased, to the creditors of, and
all persons having claims against
the said deceased, to exhibit them
with the necessary vouchers with
in ten (10) months after the first
publication of this notice, to the
said Administratrix at the law of
fice of Howard M. Lewis, Esquire,
at Plentywood, Montana, the same
being the place for the transaction
of the business of said estate in
the County of Sheridan.
Dated May 9, 1930.
MATHILDA KISLER,
Administratrix of the Estate of
Peter Kisler, Deceased, with
the will thereof annexed.
First publication, May 16, 1930.
Last publication, June 6, 1930.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
PETER KISLER, Deceased.
__
AMERICAN-CANAD1AN CLOWNS. MEDICINE LAKE, JUNE 2nd
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BANK MERGERS
(Continued from First Page)
Most of the Twin City bankers
had passes on the Northern • lines,
i Wheat was bound to decline in
I price. The saturation point was
at hand in automobiles, radios and
washing machines. The Twin City
at
Montana crowd to take u s in on
their C0PDer »
• i f
Minnesota has a rival organlza
turn to ours. "Minnesota for the
Minnesotans." A wise old mem
her advised the youngsters not to
go into the copper industry with
the Montana boys. But he said:
b f or generations have
- C. Stand in banking°on
sca | e through railroad mergers re
i „rganitaUons, foreclosuKsSwer
If M do mt "
something quick we are in serious
trouble anyway The copper hovs
fl £ copper do>s
are flush and eager to play. Get
them int <> a big banking deal with
yourselves"
' The Green Spectacles
predicts in a few
years Tn^ by-word-"cl"ver ^
l T • r -. . «7. a ^
a El ^ y Ba ? k ® r instead of
CityboyfS thTpass
« J> Montant JS ourUys Ce
j traded a plow horse for a gross of
; green spectacles.
f . committee had difficulty in
but it also makes them over con
fident.
Were More Generous
The officials of this company,
for awhile after this brilliant coup
d'etat were slightly more gener
ous in their treatment of widows
orphans and cripples.
But there soon appeared evidence
that the bee that stung Heinze
was a-fter them. For a short time
the New York boys gave Fritz the
glad hand—the expression a
"come-on" arose in New York in
1907.
i Dueling out what happened then,
No member of the committee
i IZtrooÆfn «T h d-d many
members of the O. B. F. did.
; A majority of the committee
thinks that our big strong local
banks only bought stock in the big
merger. If so, not so much dam
age has been done—our boys are
good losers, or winners. They can
spend the profits (?) or forget
1 the loss.
A minority, however, of the com
mittee reports that the actual
1 stock control of our splendid Mon
I tana Banks (the only ones in the
[United States which met checks
with money in October, November,
1907) has been sold to two
ations of the Middle West.
The minority report is hard to
believe. This would give these
porations power to replace the of
ficials of our local banks with
strangers and take the good m:
' serves, held for temporary de
pressions in mining, for tiding
over bad crops or prices of wheat,
Should Ask Questions
If the minority report is
rect (and the way our boys are
trying petting economy on Work
men's Compensation indicates to
the committee that they are sour
about something—when flush they
are, or think themselves, gener
ous) one of our boys had better
become a friendly plaintiff and
ask our supreme court whether the
entire thing is not somewhat a
gainst public policy; (before the
Minnesota hoys say, Tt is daylight
buy some more chips and we will
have another game another night.
One hundred seventy thousand
dollars the year more for Work
men's Compensation will not add
much to a market loss of 30 per
cent in six months on a four hun
dred million dollar bank merger.
Withholding a nickel from Willie
for the Sunday school plate
small help for a bad Saturday
night at poker.
corpor
cor
re
cor
»>
If
SIDELIGHTS
(Continued from nage One)
hears inside of trade unions
jurisdictional disputes.
The section of the law relating
to casual labor has been advocated
by organized labor for many years,
and was intended for a far differ
ent purpose from what the corpor
ations and courts are defining it
to mean.
When the Compensation bill was
the committee of the Fourteenth
Legislative Assembly of Montana,
and while it was being debated,
over
--»mach Sufferers
Have Bad Breath
1 i you suffer stomach troubles you're
y of bad breath. Mouth washes
but little. But — clean out your
o nach with Tanlac |nd start it work
r cht.and see bow quickly bad breath
disappears along with your other
.roubles. Money back guarantee.
•'casual labor" wa s thoroughly dis
cussed; and it was made evident
that the intent of the framers of
the bill, and of the legislators who
passed it was as follows: For ex
ample, if a judge of a District
Court hires a man to spade up his
garden, or an insurance company
lawyer hires a painter to paint his
repafr work, "Tjlidge or °o5£
ation lawver would not be romuell.
ed to nav into a condensation
fund and y the worker employed
would not come under the comnen
sation act; as it is the profession
of the judge to preside over a
temple of justice and nottohire
shovel stiffs; and it is the business
of the corporation lawyer to brow
beat witnesses, misinterpret the
law, and, as a lobbyist, to cajole
legislators, and not his profession
to engage in the honorable trade
of constructing houses or bossing
painters. /
Employers coming under Plans
S? 'S?
the compensation fund an annual
assessment on the total of -heir
assessment on tne total of .heir
annual payroll, regardless of the
number of workers they employ,'
and reeardless as to whether thev
hire a man tor an hour or a year.
If the employer is under Plan
Two a agent of the insurance com
panv in which he^ in^ureThf^ em
a^teeïeSmLs'thïüoÜtftiî;
employer gets the ao-vreo-ate „f
theannukl navroll a^dthf taaur
ance comnaM then Mrsenta a h.li
to the employer for a percentage
1 of say five or ten per cent of his
oi, say, live or ten per cent ot ms
total annual payroll, according to
the risk of the business he is en-'
e-ap-eH in « Q nromi,™ „„ f ,
comnensation insurance on hic em
plwees "" °" h ' S
Employers pari for insurance on!
Î? ^
the laborers they hire in an emer
woTs an tour But the'court °h^
ruie/ «W SJS
company gets paid for compensa
tion, it does not have to give the
injured worker a penny in rompen
sation. This is a circumstance of
downright robbery. The insurance
f<"rP aaias b ^<> a 't decree can col
lect money from employers and
give nothing in return. The em
ployers act in good faith towards
their employees. They are not to
blame that their injured worker
receives no compensation,
In order to overcome such an
unjust state of affairs, brought a
bout by court decisions, the
pensation initiative measures fccek
to amend the existing law by
striking out the word _
from the compensation act. And,
in order to protect the victims of
industrial accidents, we propose to
abolish "Plan Two."
com
<<
casual''
MONTANA FARMING
NEWS
Stanford—Deadly Camas, a poi
sonous early spring weed, has tak
en its toll of central Montana
sheep as well as northern Montana
livestock. Many sheepmen of this
district have reported considerable
loss of lambs. One operator sav
ed two lambs by feeding one lard
and the other soda and sweet milk.
Lambin gis completed in Judith
Basin county with flock percent
ages running from 125% to 145%.
Billings—With the bean market
obviously steadier, the present
outlook indicates steady advance
in prices, according to the view of
growers expressed here at the
Montana Bean Growers associa
tion meeting. J. O. Wold, Laurel,
was elected president.
Billings—Annual invasion
out-of-state sugar beet field labor
ers and their families has just fin
ished and today 1200 workers—
with their families, the total
reaches approximately 2000—are
engaged in the laborious tasks in
cident to sugar beet field work
the Yellowstone county district.
Hamilton—From a
- mere pest,
"wild" horses of western Montana
have developed into
menace of late. So thick have the
unclaimed cayuses become and
great is their consumption
range forage that Ravalli county
authorities have authorized a horse
roundup. The animals that
not claimed by rightful
an actual
owners
will be sold at public auction and
probably, will end up in thé
oTo,i«.l,foi ww«« /vP « , ine
slaughter room of a Montana horse
packing plant.
Helena Tf F TC RA-orry, >
Helena If E. K. Bowman s ex
penenced observations count for
anything, eastern Montana's nres
ent agricultural prospects are ex
cellent. The state hail commis
rioner recently returned from
tour of eastern counties and pro
nounced the season three weeks
advanced, lambing prospects are
bnght excellent range conditions,
and h f h marked re ^v d *1™ acrea ^
and a marked flax and corn acre
g
are
1 Sheridan County Receives
:
I
!
j
Only 9,450 Dollars
of $20^00 Allotment
Grand Forks, N. D., May 29—
j UP—Of the 17 Montana counties
: ta2; b i e un 5! r VaHey K cOTSrwas F the
1 werTÄ
l oans * or . s were set at
S 110 ' 00 ** , of which Valley county
< fa oT er -j borrow « d > $ 1( ^'| 83 - 2 ®
1 Sheridan county s allotment was
f 20 ' 000 of which only $9,490.50 was
1 B0 Da f m fA S

5™SfliÄ l
||^ 000 of whlch * expended $16.*
j * '
D i . A v . . . £
» lentywood Knights Or
Columbus Are Active
Ruf fa Ponvanfirm
At Bu « e Convention
„ . " OA TTTJ
ÄÄ
^f hts °, f Columbus gathered
Butte earl Y thls week to attend
he two-dav twentv-sixth Annual
M 16 two ua> twenty sixtn Annual
C . onventlon of the state orgamza
: tion -
' 01,6 of . the Principal features of
* b ,^ conc ^ av ^ comprised the two
addresses Riven by Bishop Finni
« an - The first > entitléd "Lay
ma "> talk sngl
Resting that the Knight ol Colum
1 bus fos ' er tha retreat movement,
i The second speech entitled "Catho
llc Educa tion" dealt with the his-j
tory of tbe Catholic church as it
j { d t education
; * eu 10 education.
Among those registered at the
; state convention were:
C. McNulty of Plentvwood,
who was a member of the Credent
tials ™™'"ittee; R. E. Lang, Plen
1 tywood, a member of the Fratern
a j G ree fi nc . c oommittp#»- T F
Marra ^ P^tywood. '
we ° re «■ E - ^
7 voung delegates irom Flen
tywood council,
J
;
;
:
1
25 STUDENTS
RECEIVE DIPLOMAS
Commencement Exercisies Held At
Farmer-Labor Temple Tuesday
Evening of the Plentywood
High School Graduates,
Before a crowd which packed
the large Farmer-Labor Temple in
this city Tuesday evening, 25
graduates of the Plentywood High
school received their diplomas.
Professor Foster gave the Com
mencement address, with words of
encouragement to the young men
and women as they go out to face
the world problems.
An excellent program of sing
ing interspersed the program thru
out the evening.
Supt. W. E. Stegner of the Plen
tywood schools presented the di
plomas to the graduates and Rev.
Fr. O'Rourke pronounced the bene
diction.
Plentywood is proud of its 1930
class and wishes them much suc
in whatever vocation they may
cess in whatever vocation they may
take up in their voyage through
life.
Eddie Cantor, Helen Morgan and
Rudy Valee—famous stage, radio
and phonograph recording artists I
will be seen and heard in a special j
CELEBRITIES HEARD IN TUM
fv-'
in!
M
O;
■•V-,
|
i
1
i
X-,
S'
;;
SO
of I

j MARYKATON j
revue sesuence of Florenz Ziegfeld's I
Girl." which comes to the Orpheum '
I on next Wednesday and Thursday,:
j Tune 4th and 6th. Mary Eaton, pre- i
j mier dansuese of many a Ziegfeld
i s bow, including "Kid Boote" and
"The Five O'clock Girl." i s the lead
mg lady of Glorifying the American
Glrl - The P icture , a lavish spec
smLlng*an^dlmcml? 1 * 8 ' of mus,c '
--———.
a Great Falls-UP-Approximate
ly 33% of Great Falls official cen- i
sL population of 28,648 i 8 engag
ed to gainful occupations, acwrd
tog to census figures. This Z r -
e centage includes men, women ïid
children who work either part
full time for monetary returns.'
:
or
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SUFFERED FROM
_
1 Maï 29 - U P~
Although most Montana
experienced at least a touch of
| frost during the middle of the
m0 nth and later, no serious crop
lo5ses have been reported to the
^ te ******** ^ Agnculture.
J he , m ° st ser ' 0 ^ f tbac , k wa % suf :
ft red by orchadlsta whos « fralt
( blossoms suffered considerably
i r o m c . ' ,. .
Small gram seeding is complet
ed; work is well under way on
seeding potatoes, flax and corn—
^creased acreage is noted in
the latter two. Early spring gram
1 1S . showin K Rood progress while
to;did. Sugar beet planting is com
pleted and thinning operations are
well under way. Bean planting is
umier way. ocan pianvmg is
well advanced m some localities,
Livestock is heme turned out to
Pastures thruout the state;
are excellent and latnb and caL
crops are exceptionally large with
few losses.
| Sheridan county suffered 'wo
heavy frosts and there has been no
precipitation. Growth has been
retarded by the cool weather.
Wheat seeding is virtually com
pleted and spring plowing is well
under wav with indications point
unaer way wun indications pomt
mg to an exceedmgly large flax
(acreage. The livestock condition
; shows marked improvement. The
labor situation is Gormal.
-
nifTnrn MATFC
I HlIKl H IVll! FN
tnUIYLB IWICj
- -
'COOL WEATHER
LUTHERAN CHURCH
A. M. EGGE, Pastor
Service with confirmation and
Holy Communion at Dooley at
10:30 A. M.
Services at Raymond at 3:00 p.
y
UP — Authorities
Sunday school at 10 a. m.
Divine worship at 11 a. m. con
ducted by Student Harald J. Thor
son.
m -
f I' ke confirmands meet at Dooley
Saturday, May 31 at 2 P. M.
Sunday, June 8
Services at Plentywood at 11
A. M, and at Outlook at 2:30 P.
M. and at Archer at 4:15 P. M.
These will be my last services at
these places.
The Archer Ladies' Aid will
meet at the home of Mrs. Fred
Lee Friday, June 6th. Everybody
welcome.
Lewistown
were somewhat mistaken when
they judged Walter Hayes as noth
ing but a penniless vagrant. Dur
ing the trial Hayes revealed he
was one-sixth owner of a $100,
000 business institution in River
ton, Wy». He was quickly exon
erated on the vagrancy charge.
Billings—UP — Money usually
in handy, but this particu
lar nickel almost cost Martha Hull
her life. The two-year-old child
swallowed the coin which lodged
in her throat. The five-cent piece
obstructed the passage of food
down the throat for three days.
Finally, a delicate operation
norformeH
^ ed to remo\ . it.
____
comes
was
iS' ViN
e Mark of
Genuine
Aspirin
mb
y
■- ' > liy
\
. w \
u
im:
XV
V
X
' Aspirin is like an old
tried and true. There is no
taclo v siihstîtiif. f-v
■ cZ\ - d * f ° r eithcr
• Ucmune Bayer Asoiriti is tb*
5nt -j * \ P nn is the
P 5(1 antld Ote for pain. Its re
cf mav alwavs be
• . ^ ® lcd on
occasional headache, to head-off a
coid or for , 3
' , . or more serious pain from
^ eural g^, nauritis and rheumatism.
Bayer Aspirin bears th#» word "ren
»nd,ud(hi
on the box.
Bayer.
SPIRIN
TOE SOCIAL WHIRL
Hostess to Senior Class_
East Thursday evening the mem
M- ° f « the Ron,or class and the
Misses Mary Kimball, Hazel M&C
Moran, Mae Grawe, Bessie Pace and
Dorothy Falxa were the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Wm.
home cast of town at
Ator
-, a very attrac
tive dinner served at six-thirty The
small tables were prettily decorated
by a bouquet of sweet peas. Music
games and dancing were r ._ „ iu '
pleasant diversions for after dinner
hours.
at
her
. and Mrs. W. 3.
Baess Host«
Monday evening. Mr. and Mrs. W
J. Raess were hosts at a dinner at
their home at six o'clock, compli
mentary to Miss Anna Njaa, the
casion being her birthday,
present were Misse»
oc
Those
Arna Njaa,
Minnie Dyste, Eva Rusdal, Ellen Ol
son and J. B. Alexander.
Girls Honored—
The little girls who sold poppies
Saturday were guests at a delicious
dinner at West's Cafe at six o'clock
Saturday evening. Mrs. C. W. Pet
erson and Mrs. L. E. Hein acted
hostesses.
as
• Regina, Sask.—How or where
they received . their daily ration
was one and the same to this lit
ter of hogs. Hence was that
they thrived on milk from a bottle
given in a chicken brooder ever
since their advent into this world
at the H. Wallis farm, in the D'
Arcy district.
(co.,ln U ^^p«. on.>
counties-—-McElrov
1914 when she was 14 years old.
She worked for the Has s family
for seven years.
William Hass, an uncle of Wan
da and manager of the Hass broth
ers' farming operations, wanted
have his niece committed to
insane asylum after the murder,]
without a trial. It was reported)
a t the time that William wanted
avoid a-trial at which ugly fam
jly skeletons might be exposed.
The j igt f j urors drawn for the
gp€cial term of court Jg .
LIST OF JURORS
j ȀSfetHr*
• We^tbv- Rate KefJh
oredevm, Westby, Kobt. Beigh,
Plentywood; Henry Crohn, Dag
T/»im rerv«,» Dooioîr
mar, John Cerveny, Dooley, Ed.
Homestead; Uo Z. Fran
lake Melvin E
» ,
^f anrud ' Raymond; August A.
j Gibson, Raymond; R R. Guenther,
i Dagmag Jam« HW
" ooa ' Har0I <j Uuenther, Coalndgc,
Gauthum, Grenora; Ole
Hdlegaard, Comertown; Hermo 0,
Heppner Plentywood; Joseph Hat
W1 K' °H t . look ; Hf nr y Haaven, Gre
n <>ra; Wm. J. Hunter, Antelope;
» A tt;!! p nvT¥1 ' j. pL w
Henry A^ill Raymond, Fred M.
.Hanson, Keastone, Henry M. Hen-,
dnekson, Plentywood; Hans Han
Hom « t -'?, a - d: 0le T ' Ibsen
Dagmar; Wflliam Johnson, Dag
mar; Emi1 c - Jacobsen, Home
WANDA HASS
an
stead; Charles J. Johnson West- 1
L Ted KoHer> outlook; Inland ;
1 W ">' A ' 1
Knight,
Reserve; Walter Lee,
Redstone; John Kallak,
Daleview;
Gust Leeseberg, Redstone; Mons O.
Lien,
Comertown; Hans P.
Plentywood; Ben Moe, Archer; A.
^ Malcolm, Plentywood; L A.
I ttJ 1 ?' Ee ^ sE J rark Mnler,
: Re d ston e; Peder S. J. Norgaard,
; Westby; Nielsen, Axel, Dagmar;,
1 Harvey P. Nichols, Raymond; O. '
G. Ness, Westby; Andrew Olson, j
Plentywood; John Olson, Dooley;
Ole C. Olson, Dooley; Irvin V. Pet
erson, Dooley; Niels Chr. Peder
sen, Dagmar; Nels J. Pedersen,
Coalridge; John Powney, Coal
ridge; Wm, C. Petersen, Westby;
Elfie E. Petersn, Dooley; Palubic-i
Id, Plentywood; Radons, Henry,
Outlook; R. W. Ruegsegger, Out
look; Jake Reiger, Plentywood;
Soren Rungborg, Dagmar; Leo I
Strandskov, Dagmar; P, J. Scott, ;
2 utlook î Henry Skillingberg, j
Homestead; August E, Stone, Out- !
look; John A. Stahlberg, Outlook; ;
Ralph Thompson, Outlook; Mar
!
Homestead; Peter Mack, j
Madsen.
y
i
Lars Angvick
Candidate (or
State Senator
1
on the Republican Ticket
at thç primary Election
July 15. 1930
(Paid Pol. Adv.)
&
CABornstedt
4
Candidate (or
State
Representative
on the Republican Ticket
at the primary Election
July 15. 1930
(Paid Pol. Adv.)
rt*
320 Acres 11-2 mile ®® st ^ eg j mil« 1 *
$ 2 , 200.00 on terms. (•**
of Comertown. P r,ce * 3,0
on 0 £ cr „ es 4 miles from Plentywood. ITjec *12®' g -
?*•. Y. 33 R. 68, Dagmar, price $2200.00. j*® a ' t0 ^nd
Ea^e, price $1200.00. «re, Windstorm, Ksil. An
F. D. MORCK AGENCY
LAND FOR SALE
Plentywood, Montana.
^ rida y. Ma
y jo,

* Fold
that S
Qve$
Your T,
•trie
Qnd M
oney
0
jgjSjh?
:
;;

f
m
&
n*
m
?
•j&jvy-,/:.
R\\
MADm
I
5
T
bd| foWa
, ««wfc.ijr»
h °ve co m p, Ttlll## ^
hide
or
MILLER'S
pharmacy
ft***

nui»
.,. „
! Tronson' 8 SS, k .
1 M 'Jr . %
serve- Julius Van k
! W. Wunderlich
Wirtz Outlook- V *4
tywood; JakeVeUer^
G. Zeidler, PleutywSi ^ 1
to
1 (Cont inued from Firm
t . ... n —
• , "ueen Marie
York ■" she
Jg™ im , n - u _
their Dichirt>«°f ratl ? er ^
k
as Madam Dhr ^ n ^
Madam Diana, in certain b«
conventional circles. GrovwTrl
un a narad* ,.nL i .
" p ®. p " ra .f ° "«"PM w«i.
era last March and papula
he" gotTmchod^ hw" 1, J 1 *
m „ n * e • 0 [ or R* dotf
mtnls purporting to bt irstr*.
tions from the Soviet G,^
tTüiit 7*^1
ln e tinned Mates. A tapiliK
papsrranlheslory p, Illtuj
proved that the for,,,« .„
-committed in IWw Inrk, Tta
th « greater part of the knon
world laughed at Grow, Bnk
did not P iv# a bru u J
i d d not a hang h
"city, men Jimmy Walter, tk
dapper mayor of Gotham firrf
- f"".' He ' » *
I'ctty.
i _
ASWESEEII
of Row
TO .Ne»
on
Umu,
i^SlglSeiglglS^
***********
OEM
Plentywood, Montana
Program
for the week of
June 1, 1930
SUNDAY
anc
MONDAY
TUESDAY
June 1-2-3
GREAT GARBO
IN
am cur
u
Matinee Sunday at 3:00 p- »
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
June 4th and 6th
Lavish, Singing, Dancing
and-Music Extravaganza.
Technicolor, __
glorifying w
AMERICAN GH
Girl
Fart
u
f
- Starring
MARY EATON
FRIDAY
and
SATURDAY
CAROL LOMBARD^
ROBT ARMSTRONG
"BIG NEWS"
Coming!
June 8-9-1®
GLORIA SWANSON^
-T^iffRESPASSER''

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