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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, September 25, 1931, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

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YOUTH MEETING AT
COLUMBUS DREW A
PAAT\ 1 f|W|i$ imiT\ i unTi
ill If III A I I r NI I A Ms r
UlA/I/ fil ILklil/iTll vIj
__
Anti-War Rally and Demonstration
Staged by Youag Communiais
Draws Parted House— Lillian
Husa and Charles E. Taylor are
Speakers.
Columbus, N. D.,—A crowd that
packed the New Columbus theatre
to the doors attended the anti-war
demonstration held here Tuesday
evening under auspices of the
Young Communist League.
program, which included speeches
Why
My Next Car
will be
A FORD
u
V)
When yon buy a Ford there are two things you never
to worry about. One is reliability. The other is long life.
Here s an interesting letter from a Ford owner in North
Carolina:
"My Ford was purchased May 8, 1928, and has been run 121,767
miles. It has never stopped on the road for repairs of any kind what
soever except punctures.
"The brakes were relined at 101,000 miles. My gas mileage aver
aged 21 miles to the gallon, and on tires, 19,000 miles per dre. I travel
over all kinds of road conditions—mountainous and flat.
"I consider this a wonderful record and I
will also be a Ford.**
have
assure yon my next ear
This is just one of many tributes to the reliability and
long life of the Ford. A Ford
owner in Iowa tells of driving
his Ford 73,000 miles in a single year. Another writes of
120,000 miles of good service.
Think ahead when you are considering the purchase of
an automobile and consider what it will be like after thou
■ ands of miles of driving. Will you still be satisfied? Will
you still say "it's a great car"?
If it's a Ford, you know everything will be O. K. It will
he taking you there and hack in good style, just
always done. And you will have saved
worth-while dollars
low yearly depreciation.
as it has
many important,
in cost of operation and up-keep and
FtFTEEN BOttY
TYFF S
$
430 « 640
F.O.B. Detroit, plus freight and delivery. Bumpers and spare tire
extra at U no coal. Economical time payments through the Authorised
lord Finance Plans of the Universal Credit Company.
The meeting was opened by the
singing of the International by the
young folks who sponsored the
by Lillian Husa and Charles Tay
lor, lasted more than two hours,
and the crowd listened attentively
to all the speakers had to say.
meeting and several songs were
' s ^ n ? ^y £ rou P later as part
the program.
brief jj" |f JJJJi w
sketch of what the youth
a short
move
ment of the world is, and empha
sized the fact that for the youth
there is no hope under the present
regime. The system that has rob
bed the parents of the present-day
youth of all they had hoped for
when they were young and enthus
Theiiastic holds no promise for the
youth of today, the young leader
pointed out. Whereas there was
free land an dgolden promises for
the parents of the present youth
ful generation, there is nothing of
promise for the boys and girls now
taking their place in the world un
less the system is changed. Youth
of today looks forward to a dreary
future of hopeless futility under
capitalism, in the opinion of Miss
Husa.
The war just fought
years ago did not settle anything,
and did not end war, this speaker
pointed out. And no way of pre
venting war has been found by the
capitalist government of the
world.
The only way to stop war is for
youth to refuse to fight, and in or
der to get a grouplarge enough to
be effective it is necessary to or
ganize the youth into a class
scious whole, which shall refuse to
kill or be killed for profits of prof
iteers.
A liberal applause rewarded the
young speaker at the conclusion of
her talk.
Senator Charles E. Taylor of
Plentywood was the principal
speaker of the evening, and he en
larged on the outline made by the
first speaker. Mr. Taylor went in
to details, showing that the sys
tem is robbing workers and farm
ers alike, and can not possibly he
supported by thinking people.
Farmers have produced enough,
individually, to feed themselves
and their families, almost in any
year they have raised a crop, for
the rest of thei matural lives. Yet
the reward of this labor, this great
production, has been to place the
farmers of the country in a posi
tion where two successive crop
failures wipe them out completely
as independent owners of land, and
production equipment.
"The farmers have not been fail
ures," Senator Taylor pointed out.
"A failure is a perso nwho does
not fulfill his function. The farm
er has fulfilled his function exceed
ingly well. His function ig to pro
duce foodstuffs. And he has pro
a dozen
con
duced. But what good did it do
him? He can't buy back enough
now when he has a year of failure
to feed himself and his family.
Mr. Taylor ended his speech
with a plea that the young people
be given encouragement in their
efforts to organize. The way to
build for the future is to give the
■youth a chance to leam what has
been happening and to find out
how to prevent the tragic errors
of the capitalist system, with its
wars, its unemployment, its rob
bery of farmer and worker and
consequent misery to he carried
into the live sof the future citi
zens.
The meeting in Columbus was
one of a great number of anti-war
meetings held by the Young Com
munist League in all countries of
the world, and in many state of
the union on that day.
99
Helena— According to statistics
released by the U. S. Department
of Commerce, Montana's commer
cial mines produced over three
million tons of coal in 1930.
Glasgow— State highway No. 2
is being oiled west of town.
c uüBn* Charlie Says
r i
A- 9 (NIGHT
SCHOOL
;
Some professor has
figured that a college
education, is wortK,
$35,000 ~ We know a*
young grads
L , rJS f
take «?0% off for*
cash. 1 .—* v
lotta
who'd
REPORT
of Examination of the City
of Plentywood, Montana,
— by —
B. A. Risley,
Deputy State Examiner
Commencing Aug. 12,1931
Concluding Aug. 14, 1931
MONTANA
Office of State Examiner
HELENA
Vugust 17, 1951.
CITY OP PLENTYWOOD
To the Honorable Mayor and Council
of the CH y of P!-ntywwcd.
Plenty-wood. Montana.
Gentlemen :
We herewith submit a report of
the regular annual examination of
the records and accounts of the
CITY OF PLENTYWOOD, as made
by B. A. Risley, Deputy State Exam
iner, said examination commencing
on the 12th day of August 1931, and
concluding on the 14th day of Au
gust, 1931.
OFFICERS
Mayor, Hr. J. C. Storkan.
Clerk, Mr. C. B. Robinson.
Treasurer, Mr. H. O. Stenehjem.
Police Judge, Mr. George Munson.
Munson*
Chief of Police, Mr. Robert Robke,
Acting.
Attorney, Mr. A. C. Erickson.
Water Superintendent and Collec
tor, Mr. Robert Robke.
VALUATION
Assessed Value for year
1931_
Taxable Value for year
1931 ..._
. $1,046,434.00
-$ 312,334.0c
TAX LETT FOR 1931
Fund
General _
Bond Interest _
Band _
Fire Apparatus .,
Airport ....._
9.5
7.
.5
2 . __
. 1 .
Total levy - 20 mills
City Treasurer, Mr. EL O. Stenehjem.
OPERATION OF GENERAL CASH
ACCOUNT
To balance in all funds at
time of the last examin
ation on August 31, 1930 $ 9,696.12
To receipts from above
date to August 12, 1931 16,648.92
$26,245.04
16,766.34
By disbursement« during
same period __
Balance in all funds Au
gust 12, 1931 _
... $ 9.488.70
CASH RECONCILEMENT
Cash and cash items in of
fice .
Farmers & Merchants State
Bank, Plentywood (clos
ed) Balance _
National City Bank,
York, balance _
First National Bank, Re
serve, Montana, balance..
$ 225.47
8,964.75
New
109.33
189.15
Total cash in office and
banks __
$9,488.70
DEPOSITORY SECURITIES
Farmers ft Merchants State Bank,
Plentywood (Closed.)
Approved Custodian's Re
ceipt with First Nation
al Bank of Minneapolis
covering the following:
Sheridan County Fund
ing bonds, 6%. 1934,
Nos. 54-59, 67-68, 106
107 ..
$10,000,00
TREASURER'S FUND BALANCES
JULY 31, 1931
Overdraft
Fund
General _
Street & Alley
Police _
Sewer _
Fire Apparatus
Bond Interest ...
Sinking __
Water operating
Pound _
Band _
Firemen's Relief_
Whiteway _
Balance
$■2,616.77
$18.82
22.76
1,081.39
262.85
543.50
2,414.72
2,367.82
21.40
180,57
.73
14.99
Total _
Less overdraft..
.— $18.82 $9.407.60
18.82
Net total
OFFICIAL BONDS
City Treasurer, Mr. H. O. Stenehjem.
Bond with American Surety Com
pany, Expires April 1932, according
to claim filed; this bond or the con
tinuation could not be located. i
City Clerk, Mr. Clarence B. Robinson
Bond with American Sure
ty^ Company, Expires May 4,
Water Colüöto r, No bond
City Marshal, No Bond
COLLECTIONS, AUGUST 31,
TO AUGUST 12, 1931
$9,388.68
-$1,000.00
1930
Tax Collections _
Licenses Issued _
Police Fines _
Sewer Rentals _
Interest on Bank deposits
Dog Tax Collected __.1
Water Rentals_
Pound Fees .
Miscellaneous sales _I
Refunds ...
Poll taxes collected .'..
Firemen's Disability Money'
collected __
$9.740.36
147.50
67.60
619.50
138.24
10.00
5,496.40
48.00
59.00
131.71
146.00
166.72
Total Tax Collections $16,648.92
Water Collector, Mr. Robert Robke.
To water rentals collected
from August 31, 1930 to
August 12, 1931_
To sewer rentals collected
during the same period_
$5,496.40
519.50
Total_
By City Treasurer's re
ceipts for the
_ --$6.014.90
Polio« Magistrat«, Mr. Georg« 8.
Wheeler, (Former).
To fines collected from Au
gust 31» 1930 to May 1, 1931 $66.00
By City Treasurer's re
celpts for same period.. $66.00
Polle« Magistrate, Mr. G«org« a.
Munson.
To fines collected from May 1
1931 to August 12, 1931_
By City Treasurer's re
ceipts for same period $2.60
OUTSTANDING INDEBTEDNESS
July 31, 1931
$«,014.90
same
$2.50
Warrants—
General fund_
Pire Apparatus fund_
Water operating fund..
Band fund _
Whiteway fund _
$1,176.32
2.77
812.86
100.00
1,260.24
Total outstanding warrants $2,861.19
Bouda —
Water bonds, 1926,
6%%, serial.p 6,000.00
Refunding bonds,
1927, 6%?fc, seri
„ al ... 20 , 000.00
Sewer bonds 1928,
5%%, amorti za
tion
... 7,178.46
Total outstand
ing bonds_
$32,178.46
Total outstanding indebt
edness July 31, 1931 $36.029.64
CITY INDEBTEDNESS A* CLOSE
OP FISCAL YEAR, Juu« 30, 1930.
Warrants outstanding —
Bonds outstanding _
.. $ 3,914.52
- 36,632.12
Total outstanding in
debtedness __
Less balance In sinking
fund and Investments
on hand ____
Net Intebtedness June
30, 1930
$40,446.64
1,787.49
—$38,659.16
CITY INDEBTEDNESS AT CLOSE
OF FISCAL YEAR ENDING
JUNE 30, 1931
Warrants outstanding_$ 2,666.19
Bonds outstanding... 32,178.46
Total Outstanding In
debtedness _
Less balance in sinking
$34,833.64
_ . . . _
Increase during Period
from close of last fiscal
year to date ..........—....— 196.00
•'■'eerease from June 30,
1930 to July 31, 1931- $«,044.23
fund and Investments
on hand -
2,414.72
Net Indebtedness June 30,
1931 - - - $-32,418.92
CITY INDEBTEDNESS AT TIME
OP EXAMINATION— July 31 , 1931
Warrants outstanding-$ 2,851.19
Bonds outstanding ...
Total indebtedness.
Less Sinking Fund bal
ance, cash -
Net Indebtedness, July 31,
1931
32,178.46
- $36,029.64
2.414.72
— $32,614.92
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT
Net Indebtedness June 30,
1930 -$38,669.16
Net Indebtedness, June 30
1931 _ 82.418.92
Decrease during fiscal
6,240.23
$32,418.92
32,614.92
year -
Net Indebtedness, June 30,
1931
Net Indebtedness, July 31,
1931_
On July 31, 1931 the Street and
Alley fund was overdrawn in the a
mount of $18.82 ;the City Treasurer
should not allow any fund under his
control to become overdrawn.
The City Treasurer's official
bond could not be located for exam
ination, nor could the continuation
certificate be located; we note that
a claim was filed for the premium
so no doubt the old bond is still in
effect. A new bond should be pro
cured at the beginning of each new
term of office Instead of having the
old bond renewed, for it is seldom
that the renewal certificate Its ever
filed with the bond and there is no
way of telling that the bond is still
in forcé.
The City Marshal is required by
law to have an official bond; the
City Ordinance provides for the a
mount of such bond. At the present
time the acting marshal has no bond.
The Water Collector is also with
out an official bond ; the law does
not require a bond and we do not
know whether your ordinances pro
vide for a bond for this official or
not, but as a matter of public poli
cy and of security, both for the offi
cial and the city, all officials handl
-ing public monies should be bonded
with a surety bond.
There has been a nice decrease in
the indebtedness of the city during
the past year, and the tax levy for
the year 1931 has been lowered to
help out through the poor year, but
as the reduction was in the most
part made from the Sinking Fund
levy it will be necessary to increase
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STANDARD SEDAN
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quipped to do general automobile
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invite an early
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lubrication work and
visit to our shop.
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the levy for sinking fund purposes
is* fai^from J5T3S? " the CUy
More care should be exercised be
fore claims are allowed for payment,
to see that they are fully itemized
showing dates that work or materi
als were furnished: also that they
are properly signed and sworn to.
Your attention is called to the fol
°No ng 5442! m Farmer-Labor Temple
Association, $10.00; this claim is not
sworn to.
no? 0 sworn to Gunderson, $4.00;
No. 6607F, Producers News, $14.98;
not sworn to.
No. 5534, Cha®. Morris, $'34.00
shows 86 hours work; there are no
dates showing when work was done,
nothing to indicate where work was
done. All claims should be self ex
planatory so that any taxpayer can
look at a claim and know what hi«
money was expended for.
The Annual Reports for the fiscal
year 1930-31, which closed on June
30,1931, had not been filed with the
State Examiner at the time this ex
amination was made. These reports
are due not later than sixty days
fpom the close of the fiscal year,
which means that they are due not
later than August 31st of each year.
It would be just as easy to get these
reports out promptly at the close of
the year as to wait until the last
minute to do so.
1931 examination fees not paid.
Respectfully submitted,
G. M. ROBERTSON,
State Examiner.
Per R. N. HAWKINS,
Asst. State Examiner.
B. A. RISLET,
Deputy State Examiner.
Stock Feed Loan Regula
tions Are Made Public
Washington.— Regulations unde*
which farmers in northwestern
drouth states may borrow money
to feed their live stock have been
made public.
Loans to an individual will not
be more than enough to buy feed
for 20 head of cattle, six horses
and 200 sheep for a period not to
exceed six months.
The borrower will give a prom
issory note maturing Sept. 30, 1932
at 5% interest secured by a mort
gage -on the live stock.
Applications must be at the feed
loan office, Grand Forks, North
! Dakota not later than Nov. 1. They
wiU be received from portions of
North and South Dakota, Montana,
Utah, Washington, Nebraska, Ida
„_ d Wyoming
0 am* V « , . n . _
Loan regulations have been a
mended to permit farmers to bor
row funds for the purchase of
feed for ^rood SOWS. The amcnd
nient authorized loans not to ex
ceed costs of feeding 10 sows for
six months at 75 ^nts per head
each month,
Saco—Construction is progress
ing on the Legion swimming pool
at hot water well near here.
NYSTED PEOPLES
(Continued from Front Pegu)
war. Is it justifiable ever to en
gage in war—especially now that
we know that another war will
mean the extermination of west
ern civilization? How can war be
eliminated? Does the League of
Nations provide the proper meth
od? Among other subjects to be
discussed this winter, if time per
mits, will be such as India, Russia,
our changing morality, the Ameri
can negro, etc. I ask again,
there not 50 young people who will
come to Nysted this, our first,
winter and share fellowship with
us in our discussions, in our group
singing, in gymnastics, in basket
ball, in folkdances and in every
thing serving to enrich life?
We are arranging with the Pub
lic library in Omaha to secure all
the books necessary to get in
touch with each of the above men
tioned subjects.
On the faculty will be found,
amongst others, C. P. H-ojbjerg,
Otto Hoiberg, Chris Christensen,
Dagmar Bobjerg, and the under
signed. That such a force does not
lack the outward qualifications to
teach will be seen from the fact
that it is composed of members
the majority of whom are holders
of high university degrees. I am
well aware that the above state
ment will immediately be musused
by a few antagonists. The matter
was brought out solely for
purpose of informing the youth
that the things with which he will
be brought into contact here
not necessarily of the "ham and
egg" calibre, and I am quite will,
ing to face the personal insults
that a few fanatics are bound to
hurl upon the reading of this art
icle. Let me also point out that
unless we gain your support and
gain it immediately It will un
doubtedly be the last time we three
can open the school together; we
have no endowments fund whatso
ever and must depend on free will
gifts plus tuition. Without stu
dents we must of necessity close
the institution.
I have written as boldly as I
have because I want all to under
stand that the battle line is now
drawn. Must Nysted close its
doors before they are hardly open
or will you oome to our suport i
Personally, I still have faith that
there is a Danish-American youth
eager to keep this great adult ed
ucational movement alive.
Finally, let me state rather
bluntly that if you want to loaf,
stay away, but if you have a de
sire to work and leam—regardless
of whether you are a holder of a
university or a grade school diplo
ma—come, and bring your friends
with you. You will never regret
it.
the
are
HANS HOIBJERG.
For our catalogue, address C. P.
Hojbjerg, president, Nysted Peo
ples College, Dannebrog, Nebr.
(EDITOR'S NOTE;
Readers
will recall an editorial printed in
the Producers News telling about
the two Hojbjergs, father and Fon,
delivering the most interesting
talks on Russia, Gandhi, Commun
ism and Socialism, at the Brother
hood Hall and Dagmar church the
past summer. Three months spent
at their school will be well spent
and we hope they will be able to
get their 50 students and many
more.)

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