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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, December 25, 1931, COUNTY EDITION, Image 1

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■pkï
R /H? L SOCIETY
MONTANA ^
• ti£L£NAj '
■aM
JDF
i.
-•* V
COUNTY EDITION
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
Worker«
e f the World
Unite!
Join the
United Farmers
League
Weekjy
Price 10 Cents
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE IN THE NORTHWEST
PLENTYWOOD, MONTANA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1931
No. 39
■nterwl aa second Claas Matter, Oe ttber 18. 1812, at the Po«t
•ffiee at Ple*»tywo*4, Moatana. Unde r the Act of March 3, 1818
VOL. XIV.
Force Tax Reduction For the Toiling Farm Masses
— _ c
MICHIGAN UFL PREVENTS
* SHERIFFS SALE OF FARMS
Illegal" Postponement Becomes "Legal" Thru Mass
Militant Protest By Small and Middle Farmers.
Present At Meeting to Prevent Sheriffs Sale Get
Producers News, UFL Official Organ.
* ---
farmers
Dec. 16.
Ontonagon, Mich.,
farmer delegates elected
. e ight localities: Green, Mass,
«resteel, Woodspur, Bruces Cross
Trout Creek and Topaz; be
vjee over a hundred farmer sym*
thigers packed the county court
room to the great surprise of the
trials of Ontonagon county. At
the opening of the supervisors
meeting the chairman of the farm
ers' committees presented the de
mands of cancelling mortgages,
interests, back taxes, etc.
The stopping of the
Fred Saubert's farm by the shér
if was vigorously demanded by
the farmers with the result that
the supervisors were compelled to
committee from among
themselves, including four farmers
to bold a conference with the rep
resentative of the Federal Land
Bank for the purpose of stopping
the sale.
Sheriff Forced to Stop Sale.
Poor
inf.
sale of
fleet a
At one o'clock Sheriff Schon
At that
read the sale notice,
time the farmers were having the
conference with the Land Bank
The Land Bank
representative,
representative came out on the
courthouse steps and told the
sheriff that the foreclosure was
called off for a period of 15 days.
A* difficult as it was to the sher
iff to stop the sale he was com
pelled to do so by the mass press
ure of the farmers.
A county wide meeting was held
by the farmers in the court room
of action
and a county
was elected. This committee of
14 fanrers pledged to carry out
the organizational tasks under the
leadership of the United Farmers
League. The speakers also stress
ed the point that we should not
forget our official newspaper of
the UFL, the Producers News,
which was being passed out to the
farmers thru the meeting.
Sheriff and Thugs Try to
Provocate.
I The sheriff was again provided
I with the usual "bodyguard," a
I carload of state police from
I Houghton, Mich., who followed the
I speakers around the town after the
I meeting for the purpose of cre
I ating trouble. It was definitely
I pointed out at the meeting that
I the state police are always ready
I to defend the rights of the banks
I and the sheriff against the inter
I ests of the farmers. This caused
I te state police to follow the cars
I in which the leaders of the farm
I «s went home.
I The usual trick that the county
I supervisors try to "pull off" on
| the farmers is that postponing a
foreclosure sale is "illegal.
*hen enough pressure is brought
upon the county officials by the
farmers the postponement becomes
"legal." It became "legal" in this
äs* for no other reason but that
I the farmers were militant in their
I demands and scared these politi
II dans out of their wits.
But
yy
WORKERS WELCOME
USSR DELEGATION
HUNGER MARCH COMMITTEE
WILL GREET DELEGATES.
On December 27th, the Ameri
Workers' delegation sent by
Friends of the Soviet Union,
to the 14th anniversary, will re
™ rn a nd report to the American
w °rkors, commencing with meet
in New York.
All trade unions and workers'
"'■Rarizations have been invited by
e Friends of the Soviet Union,
® e |ect delegates to greet the re
American Workers' dele
tion. Among those to greet the
g e ? a tes. will be a committee of
Dll ?er Marchers, who were re*
U ^1 the floor in Congress.
■ »Ti mass meet higs of welcome
H • 1 be held at New Star Casino,
■ ^ 0rk City, on Sunday, De
H ln ' )er 27th. The delegates will
" American workers
J kam why there is no unem
oyment in the Soviet Union;
y there are steady wage in
a «es with a seven-hour day and
^e-day week.
I of tv meetbl S is to be an answer
■ in» it ^ meiacan workers, pledg
fl of tv « su PP°ri for the defense
■ " the Soviet Union.
i
Bagley, Minn.
j
New* is a fine
ns h ^ ^.h« a great help
f. ere ', * *01 ser id in some
8 from here.—C.
to
H.
HOOVER RELIEF
NETS $$ EACH
FOR JOBLESS
FAMILY OF UNEMPLOYED IS
SUPPOSED TO LIVE THRU
WINTER ON PITTANCE.
The official "unemployment re
in the various
lief campaign
cities of the United States which
9J
was declared completed
week ago by Hoover's Mr. Gifford,
head of the federal
over a
Emergency
has
Unemployment Committee
brought in less than $8 for each
unemployed worker. On this the
governments, national, state and
city, propose he shall live and
support his family for the entire
course of 1932.
This fact became known thru
the publication in J. P. Morgan's
New York Evening Post," Dec. 15
issue of a sickeningly patronizing
and hypocritical article starts out:
"All America has rallied to the
cause of the unemployed."
Then it lists and adds up every
scrap of money collected in every
city of the country. It includes
city funds, collections through
city funds, collections through
check-off of the wages of city
and private employes, some con
tribution of bankers and others,
proceeds of foot ball games, and
absolutely everything, and arrives
at a total for the entire country of
$94,500,000.
This means approximately
$7.89 for each of the 12,000,000
jobless in this country, with no
special provision of any sort for
those who have families, and
taking it for granted the job
less will get the money,
this last can not be done. In
cluded in the Post summary are
the funds for "mass work," and
public improvements, and of
this the jobless get precious
little. Most goes for contrac
tor's profit and building materi
als, and a lot is grafted, as wit
ness the Philadelphia scandals
and those of other cities.
But
starvation and
mass misery is the actual answer
in the Post's summation of relief
funds. Against this brutal and
cruel murdering of the unemploy
ed workers, more organization,
struggle, must be conducted.
Stark hunger,
more
New York Farmers Hit
In Two Bank Crashes
(By a Farmer Oorresoondent)
Gasport, New York, Dec. 14.—
Two banks have crashed in this
section, the Wilson Bank in Wä*
and the Community Trust in
Middleport. The farmers who bad
money in the bank have lost their
last penny and will suffer even
great misery. Who can prove now
that the bankers and the Hoovei
friends of the workers
son
system are
and farmers.
I believe that big demonstra
tions could be arranged to demand
of the farmers back.
the money
TWO INDIAN CHILDREN DIE OF
STARVATION IN CENTER, NEB.
of Other Indian Families Will Die Unless They
Get Food, County Supervisor Admits.
Scores
,. ,|
Two Indian children have died
of starvation near Center, Nebras
Altho
ka, a drouth stricken area,
their deaths occurred more than a
month ago it was not reported by
the capitalist press until last week.
A doctor told the county officials
that the lives of both children
might have been saved had they
nourishment.
been given proper
One child was the two months old
of Bill Trueblood and
daughter
the other was the two F ear
Indian named Rouillard.
old
son of an
These Indians are not govern
ment charges. They live on land
given them by the government for
farming. They are permitted to
PREVENT BANKERS' ATTEMPT
TO USE TAX CUT MOVEMENT
TO SAVE THEIR MILLIONS
Tax Rductiei Thro Straggle
The Michigan Farmer, one of the Capper farm
papers, has come out with a detailed program for
tax reduction. THF CHIEF PURPOSE OF THIS
PROGRAM IS TO PREVENT A REAL STRUG
GLE BY THE SMALL AND MIDDLE FARM
ERS FOR TAX REDUCTION.
In the December 12 issue of the Michigan Famv
er they point out the condition that has been brot
about in the state as the result of the confisca
tory taxes that have been levied on the farmers.
They point out the vast amount of land that has
been sold for taxes.
"Land is now being abandoned to the
state because taxed beyond what it will
produce; and that abandonment is in
creasing at the alarming rate of an ava
lanche. In 1920, 4,656,930
sold for taxes; in 1930 the amount aban
doned in one year had increased to 9,
755,469 acres. This statement does not
tell all the truth,
"Very little of the land that went off
of the tax rolls in the ten years return
ed to private hands again by sale; and
most of what was sold was because of
the oil boom, which soon was spent, so
that these lands will again fall off.
"Moreover, while the number of acres
doubled, the amount of the levy aban
doned increased eight fold. In 1920 it
was $1,290,062; in 1930, $10,481,964.
acres were
Delegates to Hunger
March Report at Big
Meetings to Farmers
By HANS RASMUSSEN
Kalamazoo, Mich., Monday, Dec.
14.—It is raining with big snow
flakes in between, as we bid De
troit goodbye. As we move north
ward the ground is white with
snow, but the sun comes out and
it is a fine day by the time
reach Kalamazoo, about four o'
clock.
In Carpenters Hall we had sup
we
CONFERENCES TO
BE HELD FOR THE
PRODUCERS NEWS

i
For the purpose of discussing
ways and means of boosting the
Producers News by subscrip
tions, bundle orders and news
the following conferences of ac
tive county UFL members and
sympathizers will be held in
North Dakota.
Tuesday, Dec. 29, Minot—
Ward and Maclean counties..
Wednesday, Dec. 30, Stanley
—Mountrail County.
Saturday, Jan. 2, Clayton
township school house—Burke
County.
Sunday, Jan, 3,
Williams County.
Wednesday, Jan. 6, Forbes—
Dickens County.
All meetings will take place
at 2:00 p. m.
ELLA REEVE BLOOR,
State Organizer.
Williston—
,. a hpT1P fit of the Indian
etie witnout
a ^nt. Indian fami i ies
, ; oountv are at the
in tne same WU y ^ mor6
starvation level ^ ^
, , S " C V" " LJ--,, months.
°rr ^ Indian and While
warmers, ina thousands
Death °y «»rva
?5 the . t ° ling . ™ camtiilist
tion of the crism nrogram.
class, o ■ * Qrga
Fight this nongex• p g • ^
Organize demons thecovmty and
media e re if Onoose to the
state govemm -• cap italist
hunger program . -. of
class t e mass subm ft to this
n °
the masses
policy of extermination.
per, then marched to the court
house, from the steps of which we
hold an open air meeting. A
good crowd was waiting and so
were the cops loaded down with
plenty of artillery.
We never got bo speak from the
court house steps. We were or
dered back to where we come from
and back we marched with cops
lined up on both sides of us, and
how we did sing: "Hold the fort
for we are coming . . , victory will
come," all at the top of our voices.
Workers' Solidarity
The crowd followed and grew
bigger as we went. They wanted
to see the fun and probably take
part. Outside Carpenters Hall,
the crowd stopped. One of the
leaders, Wm. Reynold got inside
the building, opened a window
second story and started speaking
to the big crowd and told them
few facts straight from the shoul
der.
All at he jerked
from the window by some cops who
had sneaked inside. We could not
see what they did to him. The
crowd started hollering at the top
of their voice: "We want our
speaker!" and crowded around the
police ready for fight, ready for
murder.
The door was thrown open and
in we marched and here we found
our speaker unmolested. This was
an example of free speech in Kal
amazoo and the way it turned out
was much more effective than
talking in front of the court house
would have been.
We are all sleeping on the floor,
but the hall is warm and clean.
Tomorrow we are going to have
another meeting in Hammond, In*
diana—the place where they club
bed us the last time we were there.
Chicago, HI., Tuesday, Dec. 15.—
We are up at five, have oatmeal,
bread and coffee served in hall by
our own crew. While it is yet
dark, motor cops escort us to city
limit ' S lad to £ et rid of us and
we leave the City of Kalamazoo,
where free speech is not to be tol
«rated.
The air is a little frosty. The
sky ig c i ear and the ^ comes ou
bri * ht and warm * „
* n Bend we stop at Hun
garian Hall, where a hot meal was
prepared for us. In Gary
made a Sh0rt St0p at Workers
HaIL Mar '? Gai T workers decided
to alon ? with us to Hammond.
Hammond, Indiana
At Hammond we stopped at
same empty lot where we
been gassed, clubbed and shot
a conp i e 0 f W eeks ago. We knew
there were plenty of old bricks
(Continued en Page two)
«
"Some years ago it was said that the
lands abandoned were in the north part
of the state where the land was not worth
paying taxes on; which is a deceptive
way of saying that they were taxed be
yond what they would produce. But re
cently it has been found that the same
principle that induced abandonment in
the northern counties applies with equal
force œ and about the metropolis. More
descriptions were sold for taxes in Wayne
County in 1931 than in any other two
counties combined. Oakland came sec
ond; and more lands in assessed value
and in number of descriptions were sold
for taxes in Wayne, Oakland, and Ma
comb than in all the rest of the state
combined."
In all of this description of the terrible burden
that has been levied trru taxes the editors of the,
Michigan Farmer forget just one fact—the class
fact about the entire tax system under capitalism
—that the heaviest burden has been placed on
those least able to bear it, the toiling
They forget the fact that this heavy burden has
been levied just so that the capitalist class could
be freed from that much taxation. They forget
the fact that the tax system under capitalism is
like the rest of the apparatus only
masses.
an accessory
instrument in the exploitation of the toiling
masses by the capitalist class.
They forget these several facts with malice
afore-thought. They forget these facts in their
description because their tax program is not in
(Contbnwd 0 *
Tw»)
FARMERS TAX
FIGHT MISLED
BUSINESS MEN PUSH FOR
WARD CIVIL SERVICE
WAGE CUTS.
, class to use the militancy of the
1 farmers for the purpose of pre-J
venting increase in taxes for the
The attempt of the capitalist
capitalist class has already bom
fruit in Minnesota. The Steams
These resolutions are not in the
interest of the farmers. They
serve the capitalist class in sever
al ways. First of all they include
no tax increases for the capitalist
class. Secondly these resolutions
are purposely designed to prevent
the farmers from getting tax
duction by refusing to pay taxes.
Finally they are an attempt
smash the solidarity of the work
county taxpayers' association pass
ed a resolution directed to Con
gress urging federal employes to
accept a twenty percent cut in sal
aries. A resolution to Governor
Olson requested a twenty percent
cut in the pay of state officials.
on
a
ing class by organizing the farm
ers to fight for wage cuts for
federal and state employees. The
farmers must demand wage cuts
for the state grafters, but only
for the fat salaried and full belly
parasites, not for the workers in
the state employ, who are getting
miserable wages already.
Among the working class there
must be the solidarity of the mil
lions in this struggle with the
capitalist class. The capitalist
class will try to smash this soli
darity by just such attempts to pit
one part of the toiling masses off
against the other.
. _ ,
Organize 1 axpayers
Leagues In Miimesote
_
( By a Farmer Correspondent)
Aitkin, Minn., Dec. 7.—The far
mers out here are spontaneously
beg i nn i ng to orga nize into tax
payers leagues to cut their taxes
and cut the sa i ar i es of the county
officialg <« down to the level of the
t farmers . tocomef .- as one farmer's
wife experssed it At our town
baB> 35 f a rmers enthusiastically
talked of bettering their situation.
Hoover and olson were no t popu
lar there.
While we dcmand decreases in
taxes for the gmaU ^ middle far
mers wc most insist that the rich
farmers', railroads', power and
light companies,' and other capi
at talists' taxes be increased so that
the benefits the small and middle
farmers get out of the budget be
increased.—Editor.
The demand of the farmers
must be—sharp cuts in taxes for
all of the toiling masses, increases
in taxes for the rich.
North Ironwood, Mich.
UFL Starts Drive For
Increase In Members
(By a Farmer Correspondent)
North Ironwood, Mich., Dec. 18
—The working conditions here are
the same as everywhere. You are
lucky if you get a job and then
you get paid so little that you can
not Hve no way on it. There are
one or two lumber camps but
they can not give work to every
one. Most of the men are home.
The wages at the camps are very
low.
The conditions of the farmers
are getting worse. Many of the
farmers wont be able to pay taxes
and the interest on the mortgage.
They have plenty of potatoes and
vegetables, but can not sell them.
We have organized a United
Farmers League here and are try
ing to make a drive for new mem
bers. A mass meeting will be held
in the near future at the North
Star hall and I hope that everyone
will attend this meeting and join
the United Farmers League.
DOAK SNARLING
NEW LIES ABOUT
HUNGER MARCH
SAYS NOW THAT TUUL IS
"OUTLAWED BY FEDERAL
COURTS"
WASHINGTON, D. C., Dec. 14.
—Today Secretary of Labor Doak,
placed in the Hoover cabinet to
put over the rail wage cut and
persecute foreign born workers,
evidently dismayed at the enthu
siastic mass welcome given to the
National Hunger Marchers in ev
ery single city thru which they
passed on their return from Wash
issued another rehash of
in
the Secret Service "findings" that
were put out first to keep the
Hunger Marchers from reaching
Washington.
Doak declares, in a statement
which appears in all capitalist
that the "National
newspapers,
Hunger March was . . . virtually
wholly of Communist participa
tion." This lie was copied from
the Secret Service declaration.
But Doak then adds to it an
additional lie of his own. He finds
not divorce the Trade Union
I Unity League from the struggle,
because the Trade Union Unity
j League, which is made up of work
of all shades of political opin
supported the march to the
. he
can
1 i
ers
ion,
fullest extent of its ability.
So Doak states: "Preparation
for the march began as early
October 14 and they included gen
eral membership meetings *of the
Trade Union Unity League, which
has been outlawed by United
States courts, the District Court
and Court of Appeals."
to
The Trade Union Unity League
has never been outlawed by fed
eral courts.
There has never so far been
case in the U. S. district court
Court of Appeals in any way
(Continued oa Page Two)
in
j
j
FARMERS WILL NOT SUPPORT
OPPRESSION OF PHILIPPINES
Capitalist Class of United States Attempts to Use Ameri
Farm Masses to Further Exploitation.
can
The capitalist class is attempt
ing to mislead the farmers of the
A
United States into supporting the
continued oppression of the Philip
pines. This is being done indl
rectly by the capitalist press. Dur
ing the past week the capitalist
press has carried stories regard
ing Philippine independence under
such titles as "Fear freedom for
islands as blow to farms of U. S."
During the course of the next
several months the eighth Philip*
p j ne commission is coming to the
United States under the leadership
0 f Senator Sergio Osmena. This
commission, like those that have
preceded it, is not organized for
the purpose of getting independ
ence for the Philippine people
from the United States imperial
ists but for the purpose of mis
leading them from carrying on a
real struggle for independence.
The capitalist press states that
the representatives of the Philip
pines who are coming here will
demand free trade with the Unit
ed States for a period of ten
year8 . This the capitalist press
Tep0 rts would be against the in
terests of the American farmers
since many of the products com
pete with those of the American
farmer, particularly oils.
| They state indirectly that since
MANCHURIAN PEASANT MASSES
RESIST JAPANESE INVADERS
U. S. State Department Again Warns Rivals About
Advance Toward Chinchow.
The Japanese imperialist in
vaders into Manchuria have suc
ceeded in capturing Fakumen af
ter a very bitter struggle. The
imperialists are planning to in
tensify their attack against the
Chinese partisan bands which are.
despite the denials of the Japan
AFL LEADERS
TRY MISLEAD
UNEMPLOYED COUNCIL WILL
CARRY FORWARD STRUGGLE
Superior, Wis., Dec. 10th.—As a
result of the agitation carried on
by the Unemployed Council of Su
perior in various ways, the mass
misery has been brought to light
under which unemployed workers
of Superior must live. Through
the public hearing which was con
ducted by the Unemployed Coun
cil, it was revealed that hundreds
of workers and their families are
actually starving. As a result of
numerous meetings of the Unem
ployed Council and mass meetings
of unemployed workers, demands
were made of the city and county
authorities for immediate relief.
After this had already taken
place, the renegade leadership of
the Central Co-opeartive Wholesale
and the local leaders of the Amer
ican Federation of Labor started
a movement to counteract real
struggle of the workers for relief.
They called a meeting for this ev
ening on the basis of nearly the
same demands as what the Unem
ployed Council had proposed so
that the struggle for immediate
relief is disrupted and the ranks
of the workers are divided.
Instead of united action of the
workers under the leadership of
the unemployed workers them
selves, the result is that the strug
gle for relief for the starving rank
and file of the A. F. of L. is lefl
into the hands of the Central La-1
bor Assembly committee composed
of persons who are enemies of the
class struggle and even themselves
admit that they will not be able
do anything.
In this way the renegades from
the class struggle that are in the
leadership of the C. C. W. and the
local leadership are attempting
betray the workers of Superior.
They see the demand for immedi
ate relief and Social Insurance
gaining headway among the rank
and file of the workers in Supen
they attempt to disrupt real
The Unemployed Council,
every day and it is accomplishing
something. In view of the disrup
tion activity of the A. F. of L.
Council has adopted the following
slogan: "The unity of the workers
for immediate relief and Social
Insurance.
or so
action.
however, is getting new members
a
or
in
yy
the representatives of the Philip
pines-who are really representa*
tives of the American imperialists
^ ^ of thg Philippine people
demand free trade with
United States as well as political
freedom, and since free trade with
the United States would be op
P° sed to the American farmers
therefore the American ramiers
must oppose independence for the
Philippine Islands.
Farmers Support Independence of
Philippines.
The entire story is just for the
purpose of keeping the Filipinos
enslaved to the American impenal
ists and using the farmers of the
United States to back up this con
tinued oppression and exploitation
of the Filipinos. The same gang
of exploiters and bankers that rob
the Filipinos are the vicious ex
plotters of the American farming
masses.
The farmers in the United
States who are fighting the Wall
Street exploiters join with the
Filipino people in their fight for
independence from American im
perialism. The farmers of the
United States shall not support
the continued oppression of the
United States colonies. They de
mand independence for these col
onies oppressed by Wall Street
struggle.
the
ese, inflicting heavy losses on the
invaders. The Japanese Genera)
Shigeru Honjo has been forced to
admit that the forces facing the
Japanese invaders number over
100,000.
The Japanese invaders are ly 1
ing about the number of the«
dead in order to hide the defeats
they have suffered in their ad
vance, and in order to hide the
fact that the vast mass of the
population is bitterly opposed to
the advance and is supporting the
militant partisan bands.
The capitalist press points out
that Chinchow is the next goal of
the Japanese imperialists.
United
Ambassador
Forbes has been instructed by
Stimson to repeat the warning
given Japan within the past week
against the seizure of Chinchow.
Stimson sees in the Japanese plans
to seize Chinchow a direct threat
to United States domination over
States
mass anti-imperialist, anti
Kuomintang movement in China,
This hege
Kuomintang China,
mony has been badly shaken al
ready by the tremendous upsurge
This movement forced the ree
ignation last week of the Wall
Street butcher, Chiang Kai-shek
and forced the whole Kuomintang
crowd of the traitors in both the
Nanking and the Canton wings to
the maneuver of setting up a new
"more democratic" government ae
a means of deceiving the masse*
and heading off the anti-imperial*
ist, anti-Kuomintang movement.
The failure of this act of de
ception was followed by the mur
last Thursday of
derous butchery last Thursday of
workers and students in Nanking; /v*
when huge crowds demonstrated
against the new government.
to
to
Chiang Retain« Military Power.
Kuomintang sources now admit
that Chiang Kai-shek remains a
force in the new "more democrat
ic" government. A Shanghai dis
patch to the New York Times re
ports:
"There is an increasing im
pression that Chiang Kai-shek
might be re-elected president at
the Central Executive Commit
tee meeting scheduled for next
Monday. Although Chiang a
few days ago surrendeed all of
ficial posts, his power remains
Unchecked, especially in view of
the consolidation of his military
position through <a series of air
liances with generals loyal to
him in Chekiang, Honan, Kiang
si and Anhwei."
It is reported that Chiang may
prefer to remain for the month
unconnected officially with the
j naw government,
! wan t to wait until his Canton coU
the i eagues are in turn fully discred
; ^ ed before the Chinese masses,
jHe wouW then
j a ui ances to seize the government
Chian g may
his military
use
■and put himself forward as
! "Savior" of China, in the hope
against
the
that in their indignation against
the Canton puppets of imperial
ism, the Chinese masses
forget the bloody role of Chiang
himself as an agent of the
might
im
perialists.
The yen has continued to drop
in Japan, with increased inflation
of the currency, and the employ
throwing additional burdens
on the starving Japanese workers
and peasants. The yen dropped
at the end of last week an addi
tional 75 points to 43 cents.
ers
Honjo Thanks Wall Street Gov
eminent.
In his statements to the imper
ialist press, Gen. Honjo expressed
Japan's thanks to the Wall Street
government for its support of the
Japanese aggressions against the
Chinese masses. He said:
"1 desire to express thanks to
the American public for their
balanced judgment and waiting
to form an opinion of the Man
churian situation until all facts
are available."
"American understanding of
the policy of the imperial gov
ernment is valuable and appre
ciated."
The fall of Chinchow to Japan,
in expert opinion here, would
the definite isolation of
mean
Manchuria under Japanese control
and would be followed by Japan
clearing the region to the Great
Wall and up to inner Mongolia,
meaning Japanese mastery of all
Manchuria west and south of Tsit*
isihar. This, in diplomatic opinion
would present in the world a fait
accompli (an accomplished fact)
before the League of Nation's
commission of inquiry could reach
Manchuria.

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