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The producers news. [volume] (Plentywood, Mont.) 1918-1937, February 26, 1932, COUNTY EDITION, Image 2

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THE PRODUCERS NEWS
Published weekly at Plentywood, Montana by
The Peoples Publishing Company, Inc.
j Official Organ of the
UNITED FARMERS LEAGUE
Official paper of the City of Plentywood, Mont.
Subscription Rates: National Edition — In the
United States; per year $2.00; six months $1.00;
three months 50 cents. Foreign, per year $2.50;
six months $1.25; three months 60 cents. Jt
County Edition—In the United States: year
$3.00; six months $1.50; four months $1.00.
County Edition to foreign countries, year $3.50;
six months $1.75; four months $1.25. -*»■ —
Advertising Rates furnished upon application
ERIK BERT, Editor
HANS RASMUSSEN, Business Manager
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1932 *
JOINT ACTIONS
At a meeting of the United Farmers League at
Markham, Minn., on February 7th, one of the de
cisions arrived at was that,
"A letter be sent to the other United
Farmers League locals in St. Louis coun
ty to put up the same kind of a fight as
the farmers of Markham, and also advis
ing the farmers in other parts of the
county that if Mr. Noble is transferred by
Mr. Murray to some other of the parts of
the County, that the farmers demand that
he be fired from his position as county
road foreman and in his place put some
farmer."
Noble is a rich contractor who has been milk
ing the county for five years. Murray is one of
the county commissioners of St. Louis County.
The farmers of Markham, under the leadership
of the United Farmers League, realize that the
struggle against the handing out of the county
funds to this road contractor is not a problem of
their township alone. While they have forced
Noble off of the roads in their township, they
know that he will be put to work on some other
roads in the cunty. Therefore they call for joint
action of all of the farmers of the county on this
issue. Thru the St. Louis County Hunger March
of September 21, the farmers of the county learn
ed of the necessity of united action—of county
wide struggle.
Only in exceptional cases are our immediate
demands confined to our own township or pre
cinct. Our brother farmers in the neighboring
townships or precincts are faced with the same
oppression, the same burdensome taxes, foreclos
ures, and sales for taxes as we ourselves. If we
join them in action we can strengthen our forces.
Our front will he a broader one and our chances
of successful struggle will be increased many
fold. .
It is the duty of all United Farmers League
locals in addition to spreading the UFL in their
own townships or precincts, to see to it that lo
cals of the United Farmers League are built in
neighboring townships where they do not already
exist.
Where there are two or more United Farmers
League locals in adjoining townships or in the
same vicinity it is their joint duty to see to it that
they discuss their common problems and prepare
for joint activity. A good way to start off would
be to have a joint meeting of the executive
mittees of the two or more locals where the
ty problms will be discussed,
goal of these joint conferences should be the
ganization of a functioning county committee of
the United Farmers League to guide the work of
the entire county. This has been done in many
counties but is still a task for the majority of
them.
Organizationally we have a more important
task ahead—a task which must be accomplished in
the next several months. This is the organiza
tion of a FUNCTIONING state apparatus for the
United Farmers League.
In several states we have state organizers. As
far as a state apparatus is concerned in these
states these organizers are it. This weakness in
our organization must be overcome. Our goal must
be to organize a State Executive Committee as
soon as possible. This should be done thru a state
conference of the United Farmers League to be
called as soon as possible.
All county organizations of the United Farmers
should take up this question in the immediate fut
ure. The decision reached should be communi
cated to the National Office of the United Farm
ers League, Box 94, Superior, Wisconsin, so that
the National Office may give guidance and aid in
the organization of the state apparatus.
The intensified misery that is being forced on
the toiling farm masses make it imperative that
we build the struggle against the capitalist class
at a very rapid pace. Most important is the ex
tension of our apparatus.
Comrades. Here are ou tasks. A TOWNSHIP
com
coun
The organizational
or
CHINA
es, that they are participant* in j
the looting of China and in the i
subjection of the Chinese masses ,
to imperialist exploitation. !
It is not only in Shanghai that
the imperialists are united in |
plunder. The bankers of all the I
imperialist countries are support- i
ing. the Japanese in the further
invasion of Manchuria. The Jap
anese are using Harbin, which
they recently captured, as a basis
for the advance toward the Soviet
Union. The aims of Hie imperial
ists are to smash the Red Army
of,Soviet China, the army of the
toiling Chinese masses, and to at
tack the Soviet Union, the fatnei
land of the workers and farmers
°f the entire world. The imperi
alists want to solve the growing
antagomsms among themselves in i
of CktafüS
masses of China and against tin
1
Toiling farmers! The attadt
Front Pago)
(Con tinned
in the attack on the Chinese mass
against the Chinese masses is be
ing supported by the Wall Street
bankers, by the Hoover hanger
government—those same bankers
who are evicting us from our land,
that same government which de
nies the destitute workers and far
mers of the United States relief,
The capitalist class which is oon
ducting a starvation struggle a
gainst the masses. in the United
(States is preparing to participate
openly in the armed attack on the
Chinese masses a!nd in the attack
on the Soviet Union
The Wall Street imperialists
plan to spill the blood of thoos
anda of American workers and
farmers, of Chinese workers and
farmers for the right to nlimdoi
China.
Protest against the war moves
of Wall Street. Demand the im
mediate withdrawal of all Ameri
can armed forces in China. De
monstrate against the bloodv war
makers of Japan. Demand the
immediate withdrawal of all Jan
anese forces from China. Demon
-MUHj -ith the Chin,
ese toiling numso« against the im
Hatchers. Hands off Chi
na! Defend the Soviet Union!
ORGANIZATION OF THE yNITEQ FARMERS
LEAGUE WHEREVER THE PRODUCERS
NEWS IS SPREAD. WHEREVER WE HAVE -A
TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATION WE MUST
BUILD TOWNSHIP ORGANISATIONS IN THE
ADJOINING TOWNSHIP^. / WHEREVER "WE
HAVE TWO OR MORE ^OWNSHIP ORGANI
ZATIONS IN THE SAME COUNTY
g, WE MUST
HAVE A COUNTY ORGANIZATION. < WHERE
WE HAVE TWO OR MORE COUNTY ORGANI
ZATIONS, WE MUST BUILD A STATE ORGA
NIZATION.
THIS IS OUR TASK THIS MUST BE AC
COMPLISHED NOT IN THE DISTANT FUTURE
BUT IN THE NEXT SEVERAL MONTHS UP
WARD TO A MASS UNITED PAR.M^S
LEAGUE !
t
ft '
UFL———
OF THE EXPLOITED!
We received the following letter fron) a farmer
in Elmo, Mich., last week;
"Dear Comrade Editor: There are in
tibia community lots of farmers. who
would join the United Farmers League
if it were not that they are afraid that
they'll have to give tip their religion.'*
Undoubtedly many other comrades have met
farmers who feel similarly. What is the United
Farmers League? The United Farmers League is
the MASS organization of the small and middle
farmers. Thru the United Farmers League the
toiling farm masses are organizing in order to
protect their homes, and the very existence of
their families and themselves in this most terrible
crisis. In order to protect themselves the toiling
farm masses must organize in solid ranks.
Only their iron ranks can stand off the on
slaught of the capitalist class, the exploiters, the
Federal Land Banks, the land companies, the tax
collectors, all of whom are attempting to get the
very last penny that the farmer has and will
evict him from the land when they can get no
more out of him. They do not discriminate among
the farmers on the basis of their religion. Wheth
er a farmer is a Baptist, Lutheran, Catholic, Jew
or atheist, he can be pretty certain of the same
brutal treatment from the exploiters, from the
bankers and their state. The toiling farmers can
expect more of this non-discriminatory exploita
tion. They have already had a bitter draught of
it.
The attack by the Federal Land Banks on the
toiling farmers which is being pushed at the very
lime when the Hoover Hunger government is
spreading the most hypocritical propaganda about
the "relief" that is being given the farmers—is an
attack on them regardless of their religious beliefs
or lack of them. This attack is not against Bap
tist or Catholic or Lutheran or atheist farmers—
this attack is against small and middle farmers,
against the toiling farmers, AGAINST THE EX
PLOITED. THIS IS THE ATTACK OF THE
EXPLOITERS'.
We are Congregational, Methodist, Presbyterian,
Evangelical and atheist farmers as far as our re
ligious beliefs or lack of them are concerned. But
AS FARMERS WE ARE SMALL AND MIDDLE
FARMERS, WE ARE OF THE TOILING FARM
MASSES, WE ARE OF THE EXPLOITED.
SINCE WE HAVE LIVED AS THE EXPLOITED,
SINCE OUR EXISTENCE IS THREATENED
BY THE EXPLOITERS, WE MUST ORGANIZE
AS TOILING FARMERS, AS MEMBERS OP
THE CLASS THAT IS EXPLOITED.
The United Farmers League calls on the toil
ing farm masses to take up the struggle for
their very existence, against the present misery
that they now suffer and the still more brutal
misery that the capitalist class is threatening and
preparing to force on them in order to save its
billions that have been piled up out of the sweat,
the blood, and the misery of the exploited of the
entire country, the exploited of the city and of the
land.
Toiling farmers! The United Farmers League
does not ask you of what religious faith you are
or if you have any religious beliefs whatever. The
United Farmers League does point out to you that
the only way in which we farmers can protect our
farms and our homes from the hands of the sher
iff and of his masters, can protect our wives and
our children from the intensified misery of the
capitalist crisis is thru militant mass organization.
The United Farmers League calls on you to orga
nize in ten thousand ranks to spread the struggle
around your immediate demands—demands which
j you shall draw up in accordance with your local
conditions, a struggle which must not only be built
by you but which must be organized by you.
The United Farmers League does not ask
whether you are Greek Catholic, Lutheran or
Methodist. But it does ask if you will organize
with your fellow toiling farmers. It not only asks,
hut urges and calls on you to organize now to re
pel the attacks of Wall Street and of its agents.
Mass organization of the toiling fanners in soli
darity with the workers of he cities is the onlv
bulwark that will stand against the horrible on
slaught of the capitalist class.
WE ARE OF THE EXPLOITED. AS SUCH
WE HAVE LIVED, AS SUCH WE MUST ORGA
NIZE FOR STRUGGLE. BUILD THE UNITED
FARMERS LEAGUE—OF THE EXPLOITED
AND AGAINST THE EXPLOITERS.
CAUF. VETS
(Continued from last week)
bankers and the capitalist class,
not for the war veterans, workers
and farmers, whose living stand
ards are being driven lower and
lower by the demands for interest
for th«FbondboIders.
He is proud of the fact that
seventy-two percent of the veter
pis have been able to pay their
interest and installments on prin
cipal. But his pride like his
"alarm" is not concerned with the
veterans. He is proud that the
capitalist class is still sure that
it can squeeze its demands out of
the seventy-two per cent He is
not "alarmed" by the fact that
these seventy-two per cent have
only been able to pay their inter
est by driving themselves and
their families more strenuously,
by flashing their own standards
of living down to existence stand
ards.
This is what these veterans now
have—fourteen years after tfm>
helped to make the world safe for
th democracy and exploitation of
Wall Street.
l f 000 New Subscribers by March 16th
)t\
... . . .il
We are breaking into new territories right along;
but there are a lot of places left yet where they do not
. . n 1 VT J , VT
know about the Producers News. We want live com
Doings of the
Advance Guard
rades in every community to push the paper. The farm
ers need a paper, need to be organized, they are ready for
it, but somebody must go ahead and do it. Start them
out with the paper and you have a good start.
Besides our subscription books we have now print
ed a lot of 25c Subscription Cards, We sell them ten for
$2.00 paid in advance. The card is good for a six week's
sub. At mass meetings these cards come in handy. All
you have to do it to sell them. The other fellow fills
in and mails it. Every time you sell a card you can stick
a nickel in your own pocket if you want to.
For your meetings you should order
as many as
you think you'll need and send in the 25 cents when you
have sold the card
LAST WEEK'S DOINGS
Butte, Mont.,
Charles Wilson,
pays for bundles.
Heinola Farmers Co-op.
York Mills, Minn., sends us three
dollars and orders six copies sent
each week.
W. W. Labbo, Jlenry, Neb., is
here with a one year subscription.
Elo, Mich.,
New
Arthur E. Luoto,
starts out with four subs.
Wm. Lapinoja. of Enumclaw,
Wash., comes in again with one
more sub.
Ned J. Smith of Hudson, Mich.,
sends stamps for sample copies.
He is going to start out getting
some subs.
Arne Jasfeela, Newell,
wants another 50 copies, of the
Producers News.
INTERESTED IN FLORIDA
John Hovan. Jacksonville, Fla.,
wants to get connected up with a
real militant organization. He
writes for copies of our paper, y
H. F. Hanson, Williston, N. D.,
subscribes for another year.
Emil Falk, Glencoe, Minn., is
This times he digs
S. D.,
here again,
up $3 and asks us to send sample
copies to 100 names. Emil is one
of trie live» ones we hear from al
most every week. This week he
is here twi*e. •
RED SUNDAYS COUNT
Eino Hrvi, Brantwood, Wis.,
writes: "Enclosed find $5.60 which
is for subscription to the Produc
ers News. We had a "Red Sunday"
for the paper yesterday and this
is the result." The result was 11
subs. We sure like to have more
Red Sundays.
Roy Miller, Frederick, S. D.
sends us one sub.
P .J. Barrett, Sanish, N. D. is
here again, orders a subscription
book and pays for copies of paper
to be used at N. P. L. convention
at Watford City.
Olgat Starr, White Earth, N. D.
sends us a list of names for sam
ple copies.
Clarence Tucker, Flaxton, N. D.
one sub.
Oscar Luttio, Frederick, S. D.
sends in name of friend wso is
ready to go to work for paper.
Fred Weitz, Portland, Oregon is
another one who intends to get us
some subs. He wants sample cop
ies.
Nick Long, Kalama, Wash.,
wants some bundles.
FROM THE FAR EAST
John Giba, Ithaca, New York,
asks for sample copy.
Ray Jenks, Plymouth, Mich., al
so found out about our paper and
subscribers.
John Jacobson, Meadow Brook,
Minn., comes in with three subs
for a start.
Robert Kirmo of Ludden, N. D.,
"Would like to get some copies of
the Producers News so I can show
it to the farmers around here and
get some sul^cribers."
W. L. Wright, Great Falls.
Mont., pays for 50 copies to be
sent to Le wis town.
Paul Purola, Baie De Wasai,
Mich,, writes for subscription
books and pays for 50 copies to
start with.
Antti Hakkarainen,
Mich,., subscribes.
ENJOYS READING IT
Daggett,
Owen J. M, Olsen, Portal, N. D.
sends us two dollars for the pa
per and writes: "Hope you will
keep the good work going. 1 enjoy
reading your paper very much."
Geo, Ryebum, Cove Park, Ohio,
writes for subscription books and
says: *T will do my best to organ
ize and get subscribers for the
Producers News."
A. J. Broadwater, Havre, Mont.,
sends in four 25c subs.
W. A, Walker, Centerville, Iowa
writes for copies. He says: "I be
lieve the fanners around here are
about ready for action if they can
be educated along the right lines."
Seven Witenius, Angora. Minn.,
writes for subscription book to be
sent immediately.
B. A. Faulkner, Grand Rapids,
Mich., sends money for bundle to
be sent to Sparta, for meeting. He
also asks for subscription book.
Lars Bolland, Langford, S. Dak.
subscribes for one year.
Stanford Altpeter, way back in
Ashland, Massachusetts, sends in
one sub.
Arvid Pennala, Phelps, Wis., re
news his subscription.
Otis Paffinborger, Casey, Illin
ois, sends money for bundle and
tells us to send it soon as possible.
WOMAN TAKES PART
Isabel Martin, Chico, Calif.,
writes: "If you send me a sub
scription book and some sample
copies I think I could get some
subscriptions for you."
A. O. Kainu, Roberts, Mont.,
comes in with four subs.
Joseph Peterson, Sutton, N. D.,
wants sample copy.
I. Weitman, Kauneonga Lake,
New York, subscribes and orders
bundles.
T. A. Leppi, Iron Belt,
Wis.,
, ... . _ !
sends money for bundles to he
sent next four weeks. 1
Norman Jacobson, Bonetrail, N.;
D., sends in four subs.
John "ohl, Cromwell, Minn.,
sends us two subs.
A LIFT THAT COUNTS
Frederick Co-operative Mercan
tile Oo., Frederick, S. D., orders
the Producers News sent to ail
their co-operative members for six
months and sends us check for
$134.00. That's the kind of co-op
erative spirit that counts. Other
co-operatives should do likewise.
Who will be next?
Arrest Revolutionary
Bulgarian Peasant Leader
Sophia, Jan. 19.— Lazar Stanev,
one of the most prominent leaders
of the revolutionary peasants in
Bulgaria and a member, of the
parliamentary fraction ef the Bul
garian Workers Party, was ar
rested today. Stanev is one of
the best-hated men in Bulgaria
and at the same time one of the
best-loved, by the bourgeoisie- and
the peasants respectively. JHis
life is in danger.
USE LOCAL STORIES TO SPREAD
THE PRODUCERS NEWS
Bagley, Minn., Feb. 8.—Will you send us a bundle of
fifty Producers News of the issue that will have the news
that was sent from Clearwater County.
This letter which we received in the past tew days
shows just what effective use can be made of local stories
in spreading the Producers News. The United Farmers
League in Bagley, Minnesota, sent in a good story of
their local struggles and now they are going to use fifty
copies of the Producers News containing this story in or
der to get subs. The farmers will be convinced that it is
their paper when you can show them a story of their own
county—a story that shows them, on the basis of their
own conditions, that the United Farmers League is lead
ing them in their struggles and that the Producers News
is the paper of their class, that the Producers News is the
paper of the toiling masses.
Butte, Mont., Feb. 6.—Please find enclosed an article
regarding our Feb. 4 demonstration. When you publish
this please send us an order of 200 paper». The last local
story in the paper brought much favorable comment on
the Producers News among the miners in Butte. The
literature agent reports that the bundle order of fifty
sold out in half an hour. •
|
1
The Producers News fights not only in the interest of
the toiling farm masses but for the united struggle of
these farm masses with the workers in the cities against
the common enemy—the Wall Street bankers, the capi
talist class. The miners of Butte are recognizing this.
The unemployed workers of Butte are realizing this.
That is the reason why the Unemployed Council of Butte
is spreading the Producers News among these miners.
They sent in a good story of the demonstration on
February 4 and ordered 200 copies of the Fet* 12 issue.
The Producers News will help them organize the unem
ployed workers of Butte to wrench relief from the Ana
conda-owned government of Butte and of the entire
state.
These are not isolated instances of good local stories
Every issue of the paper carries perhaps a dozen good
stories. It is the duty of every United Farmers League
local which sends in a story to see to it, thru the ordering
of a good sized bundle, that this story of their local con
ditions gets good distribution among the farmers. If the
Council
one
the Producers News to unemployed MINERS and other
workers, we ought to be able to do much better, relative
ly, selling the papers among FARMERS.
This is a job which can be done and should be done,
not only by the UFL locals but by every single farmer
who sends in a story. That doesn't mean that you should
take 200 papers. Get 10 or 20 or whatever you think
you can distribute if you put in some activity. We'l
stand the burden of carrying the extra papers until you
get paid for them.
With the copy of the paper containing the story of
your locality you can go to the farmers and tell them,
Here Bill, the Producers News has a story about
county (or township or precinct). What do you think
of it.'" Then you can point out to him that the local
papers wont print these stories and that the reason the
Producers News does, is that it is the paper of the toiling
farmers—-HIS PAPER.
< <
our
Let's see who is going to be the first to send in the
next order for a bundle containing one of your local
stories—or if you already get a bundle, who is going to
increase the order.
Michigan Farmers'
I ' Illusions are Being
Smashed by Crisis
* 9
Northville, Mich., Feb. 20.—The
farmers are growing radical out
here but still think they can pull
themselves cut of the rut. This
coming season and fall will con
vin , ce t . h , em that S* ere Jf "°
under the present capitalist sys
tem.
„ , m , ...
Comrades, you have an
error in ybur paper of ^
Ä i^n 1CeS ThP
$1.60 per 100 pounds of milk. The
prices are; base miHc $1.20,
plus 75 cents. Things will change
around here soon. Am working
on subscription prospects.
THE URAL WORKER
WRITES TO US .
i WILL TELL U. S. FARMERS OF
SOVIET COLLECTIVES
! Several weeks wrote to
the Ural W'orker (Uralski Rabo
chi) in Sverdlovsk in the Soviet
Union and asked the comrades
there if th€y would gather
information for us about the col
Active farms in their neighbor
hood. We did this to get for the
farmers of the United States some
more information about the pro
gress that their brothers are mak
ing in the Soviet Union,
The answer of the comrades in
Sverdlovsk follows:
some
Jan. 28, 1932
The Producers News,
Plentywood, Montana.
Dear Comrades:
We are in receipt of your let
ter of the 7th inst In a couple of
days we will forward you -an art
icle showing a general picture of
farming conditions in the Ural
territory, growth of collective
farms, etc,, with some photo
graphs. Needless to say that we
are anxious to get a copy of the
Producers News and in our turn
will send you several samples of
farming papers and journals pub
lished in Sverdlovsk.
With comradely greetings,
THE URAL WORKER
Sverdlovsk, USSR.
FREDERICK, S. D, CO-OPERATIVE GETS
BEHIND PRODUCERS NEWS IN DRIVE
Jo?
rde
in»
ut
iinH
FREDERICK, S. D., Feb. 18.— The co-operators of the P«d*ri-L
community have felt for a long time the necessity for combatting «£
of misleading and slanderous propaganda which has been spread
this locality ana elsewhere by the Finnish "co-operative"
published in Superior, Wisconsin. The intention has been to mislead
the supporters of our oo-operative ana thereby hinder our wo^k and
progress. This need has been so great, and the demand of tie mem
mgLsten t thats ome means must be found to counteract
•- ^ f ^Tthe local cc-operative institutions ana The
SSaUve mo von ent in general, that the Board of Directors 0 fft*
Co-operative Mercantile Company at their meeting decided tn
appropriate $150.00 out of the educational fund and senu the Prod*
g' N J ws to our stockholders and patrons. ° dUe '
Tlirough this means, we hope, the readers of the Producers
,^11 leam the basic reasons for the co-operative controversies and
what the workers and farmers should do under the present ever dee».
;ning economic crisis. This is the one reason why some of ^
Frederick who have not taken the Producers News before are
ceiving the paper for six months.
We realize fully and more so now than ever that the co-operative
movement is in danger of becoming nothing but the tool m the hand*
5 f the profiteering and exploiting class; in direct contradiction of the
purpose and intent of the co-operative movement when it was first
founded. The co-operative movement should and must be made a
weapon in the hands of the working class, the producers and consum
ers. The co-operative movement is of no use to the workers and farm
ers unless it is made a means to unite toilers in the struggle for à
better standard of living and to abolish poverty from the earth. To
be a consciencious co-operator education is necessary, learning of the
econmic system under which we are living. It is a disgrace to see on
the one hand the great successful "co-operative" institutions with large
dividends and other immediate material benefits and at the same time
see people living In the utmost misery and starvation, without bare
necessities of life. Witness for example the National Grain Corpora
tion run and operated by high salaried officials, working under the
control of the capitalist class, but under the false name of co-oper
tion." Ask yourselves why are the exploiters favorable to such so
called co-operation and why do they preach neutrality to the
ative movement.
»TI
10*
mass
ith
in
P
in
al
and
iyin
ie.
lit]
■n
iio
iat
you in
now re
'e
>orl
»n
;nt
ital
i .4
iil<
itc
P
m
li(
co-oper
♦ * ♦ ♦ *
«
In the name of the Producers
News, the United Farmers League
and the militant farmers of the
entire country who are rallying
for the struggle against the mis
ery of capitalism we greet the
the class conscious action of our
comrades in Frederick, South Da
kota.
The comrades in Frederick point
out to us the role of the working
class co-operative and of capital
ist "co-operation." The working
class co-operative of workers and
farmers is a direct organ in the
class struggle. Any other "co-op
eration", whether it be the Feder
ai Farm Board "co-operatives,"
the small co-operatives which
strive to show dividends as high
as capitalist institutions at the
close of the year, are only part
the capitalist system of exploita
tion and misery.
The Workers and Farmers Co
operative Unity Alliance has
_
WOMEN AND. WAR
War in China.
Japanese im- j
perialists burning Chinese houses, j
shelling Chinese workers. Chinese j
children, women and men blown j
pieces by shells, bumea alive j
their homes.
American gunboats landing ;
troops in China. Pictures of A
merican marines, warships, admir- ;
als and generals featuring the
news in the capitalist press. News- j
papers, movies and radio talking i
of war "for the defense of Ameri- i
can lives and property.
What has this war in the East j
to do with women workers in fac
tories, fields and homes in the j
United States? What did the 1
World War mean to women of i
the working class, and what will
the next imperialist war mean?
What preparations is the United
States making for war? And why
does the capitalist class want war
against the Soviet Union, the
workers' republic?
These are some of the ques
tions answered in the new pamph
let, WOMEN AND WAR, by
Grace Hutchins, published by the
Communist Party of the U. S.,i
and now ready for distribution in'!?"
connection with International Wo
men's Day, March 8th.
tjr.ii . . , . ,
With illustrations and a picture
cover drawn by Wm. Cropper, the
pamphlet presents a most attrac
•f P F e f? nCe ti- aiM L lt should be
distributed by the thousands net
on y among women workers but
among men workers as well. To
secure the widest possible distri
bution for the March 8th demon
ÄvV' e ro y )gr ^ dle 0Td l f
ÏÏ A V° Werkes Library pub
vSt ™ 0X if 8. Station p, New
, j S* y 'i ^ >er c °py- * 3 -33 per
hundred, plus express charges.
Less than 60, no discount.
50 to 1,000, 33 1-3% discount.
1,000 and over, 40% discount.
.
$o
50 PYORRHEA
TREATMENT
{IF IT FAILS)
Free
Pvradium " guaranteed to give relief from
——- pyorrhea, trench mouth, bleed
three weeks or
ing gums, sore mouth, etc., in
money promptly refunded.
RADIUM REMEDIES CO.
Sexton Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn.
GETTING RESULTS:
t
When 1 started using Pyradium I had pyorrhea
prett yhad and my gums were pretty sore. I
had such bad breath. 1 did everything but nothing
seemed to help until 1 used Pyradium. h s 8UTC
wonderful. 1 always had Neuritis in my 1®^ arTP
bad. 1 would have to walk the floor many
nights, hut now its just fine. Pyradium is the mos
wonderful thing 1 ever used. 1 have recommend
it to many of my friends.
MRS. HERMAN ROTTLUFF,
so
Owatonna, Minn
* « * *
* ♦ » » •
pointed out the role of working
class co-operatives. "We must
make of the co-operatives insvru
mente in the class struggle serv
ing only the class interests of the
workers and poor farmers. The
only unity possible of accomplish,
! ment in the co-operative move
; ment of trie workers and farmers
is unity based on the PROLETAR
IAN CLASS STRUGGLE. That
is what the Workers and Farm
ers Co-operative Unity Alliance
: stands for.
The
on
I Pi
[of
N:
un
99
Frederick Cooperative,
which is a member of the Work
ers and Farmers Oo-opçrative Us
| ty Alliance, has shown by its ac
tion that it is determined to march
along in trie class struggle mill
tantly and determinedly. This ac
of tion must be an inspiration to all
, of us to intensify our work, to
build the United Farmers League
into a mightier organization of
the toiling farm masses and the
Producers News into the
■ Ö
mass organ of these masses.
$400 HIT
(Continued from front page)
exceed $2 for cotton and tobacco
and $4 for truck crops. Fruit
growers may borrow not to exceed
$25 per âcre for fertilizer and
spraying materials for orchards
and vineyards. All loans for these
purposes are included in the limit
öf $400 on the individual loan,
sons who did not engage in farm
in * in 1981 > nor «unois. Loans
for summer fallowing are not au
thorized. The money loaned from
this appropriation may not be
used for the Purchase of livestock,
the f€edill K of livestock other than
workstock, the purchase of mach
iner y» or ®° T payment of taxe*,
de bts, or interest on debts,
farmer who desires to ob
tain a loan will make application
?" a f ?™ P? 0 ™ 1 « 1 by ■ th ' ^
taI> °/. Agriculture and a
S"" e tlrae . w, ' l a "? te J5
tbe a,munt hls ,■?"? Ü
glVe v - . y L f Ä ^
" s T", " S' and
'J? 2 ' Application blanto ana
oth ? r »««ssary forms mil M
sent, as soon as they can be pnnt
ed to county seed loan advisory
committees to be set up in each
county
The'offices for the making of
crop production loans recently aa*
thorized by Congress will be in
Washington, Minneapolis, St.
Memphis, Dallas, Salt Lake
city, Spokane, and Grand Forks,
North Dakota. The offices in
Washington, St. Louis, Memphis
and G ran d Forks are already toe*
tioning, and made loans in 193J
The offices in Minneapolis, Dai
las, Salt Lake City and Spokane
will be established within the next
flpw days.
Loans will not be made to per
m
i

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